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Publisher's Summary

From the author of the thrilling science-fiction epic Children of Time, winner of the prestigious Arthur C. Clarke Award.

Christopher Paolini described Adrian Tchaikovsky as 'one of the most interesting and accomplished writers in speculative fiction'.

Shards of Earth is the first high-octane instalment in the Final Architecture trilogy. 

The war is over. Its heroes forgotten. Until one chance discovery...

Idris has neither aged nor slept since they remade his mind in the war. And one of humanity’s heroes now scrapes by on a freelance salvage vessel, to avoid the attention of greater powers.

Eighty years ago, Earth was destroyed by an alien enemy. Many escaped, but millions more died. So mankind created enhanced humans ­such as Idris - who could communicate mind-to-mind with our aggressors. Then these ‘Architects’ simply disappeared, and Idris and his kind became obsolete.

Now, Idris and his crew have something strange, abandoned in space. It’s clearly the work of the Architects - but are they really returning? And if so, why? Hunted by gangsters, cults and governments, Idris and his crew race across the galaxy as they search for answers. For they now possess something of incalculable value, and many would kill to obtain it.

  PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.  

©2021 Adrian Tchaikovsky (P)2021 Macmillan Publishers International Ltd

Critic Reviews

"Brilliant science fiction." (James McAvoy on Children of TimeI)

"Full of sparkling, speculative invention." (Stephen Baxter on The Doors of Eden)

What listeners say about Shards of Earth

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Enjoyable

I enjoyed listening to this book but I have one small annoyance and that was the characterization of Idris' voice at the end of the book. Over dramatic I thought.

4 people found this helpful

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A joy to listen to. World building at its best

I really enjoyed this book, the quality of the writing is really high, the performance of the narrator was very impressive with a great variation in her voice for each character making it sound like a full cast reading.
The level of detail in the story was thoughtful and compelling. It reminded me of some of the great sci-fi movies and TV shows that feature a ragtag bunch of crew all working together on a broke-down ship. It reminded me of things like Firefly and alien 3 while still being clearly original. Can't wait for part 2.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Andrew Ford
  • 08-06-2021

A Bingeable Space Opera

An excellent first installment in a new trilogy from Adrian Tchaikovsky. I've listened to Adrian's other sci-fi Series (Children of Time and Children of Ruin) and while I very much enjoyed the epic nature and inter-species perspective of those works, Shards of Earth is much more relatable.

This novel, whilst taking place on an Epic scale with the extinction of humanity as a potential outcome, makes itself accessible by it's character-driven focus on the crew of a salvage vessel as they become embroiled in politics and war through the unintended consequences of their actions. Sophie Aldred as narrator carries the performance well, managing characters of all genders with equal aplomb.

I will be eagerly awaiting the second novel in this trilogy, which will be an instant-purchase for me. I highly recommend this book to anyone that enjoys space opera or has read Adrian's previous works.

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  • d
  • 31-05-2021

Excellent, original space opera

Shards of Earth is a fantastic blend of uniquely human moments, uniquely alien moments, and a whole lot of destruction patch-worked together in strings of character development that span decades and space-systems. It’s a vast pool of new, alien ideas, of horror, of loss and small triumph. I loved this book to bits.
The plot, in short summary, sees the threat of the Architects gone, disappeared with the best efforts of Parthenon and the Colonies; the great human polyspora is free to continue, while the hounds of war skulk in the background. Idris Telemmier is an Intermediary, a psychic who touched the mind of the Architect and fended them off, and Myrmidon Solace a vat-bred warrior-angel whose people helped make it so. But now the war is behind them, the Colonies and the Parthenon’s relationship is so broken they’re close to war, and Idris and his crew on the Vulture God are called to a job to recover mysterious wreckage that could throw peace out the window. It’s a plot that takes you – literally – through jumps across vast space, through Throughways and the vast Unspace, where the void looks back at you. Where something lurks. From jump to jump, there’s action, intriguing aliens, battle scenes, and loss enough to pull a few tears at every turn. It’s a book that doesn’t relent and tugs you through its pages at an alarming rate. There was no low point in this one, for me. It was wondrous and riveting from the very start. And while the explosive ending peters out into something well-rounded, it does nothing to take you from hanging on that cliff.
Here, the ‘alien aliens’ are a treat; they’re a creative smorgasbord of new and intriguing ideas which relate to and are themed heavily around our very own earthborn zoology. I’d heard Tchaikovsky drew ideas from our animal kingdom before but had never seen it in action. As regrettably, I’ve only read a novella of his, and now this – though this book has moved him to an auto-buy status. I digress. By alien aliens I mean not the humanoid type that we see a lot in sci-fi, but the weird, strange, and definitely not human that we see here. For instance, the Castigar, who are very much like giant leeches that have forms dependent on their purpose, and an array of weapons attached to their heads? Or the Essiel, a race of clam-like aliens who rule over the Hegemony as gods, a coalition of alien species surrendered to them under the promise they can fend off Architect attacks, should they return. It gave depth to the book, and a sense that every new character we met was an incredible story of their own, spanning worlds, space travels and a separate history that you’re desperate to learn more about.
Accelerators, psychic waves, and new tech galore. Engines that claw and grab onto space, suits that do the same and pilots that can draw the curtain of real space back to reveal Unspace, a back channel that allows quickly travel through a dark void, but also speaks of horrors and strange consciousness that breath down your neck; there was no shortage of original ideas in this book. The way even the ships moved through space was explained was believable enough, yet completely new and just adds to the layers of intrigue.
Last, but not least of all, Shards of Earth had characters that you just can’t help but care about. Idris, the Intermediary, a psychic that navigates Unspace, that’s able to tap into the minds of the enemy, hasn’t slept for fifty-years, nor has he aged; the entire process of him being awake in the void while his crew slept, for fear they might go insane, was … touching. It resonated with me and dealt with elements of loneliness, of fear and depression, or not being able to sleep for fear. Unspace was an exercise in what it means to look after your own mind, and how without others around you, you could be lost in the void forever. I don’t know if that was the intention, but it certainly went to depths I didn’t expect there and was very clever and thoughtful with them. You have Solace, who has a strong heart, but also a strong sense of duty. She’s part of a race who’s vilified and rejected for the way they were born, for what they are, despite all the help they gave in the past. Or Olli, who found just living a hardship, but created a frame around her for which she can be free, but still can’t escape the anger within. And Kit, who culture makes him entirely, entirely alien from the rest of his crew, but who somehow finds a way to bridge that gap, a way to be loved for the crab-like alien that he is. I think just in the characters alone, this book is phenomenal.
Overall, if you like brand-new ideas, A LOT of action, and tears in equal amounts, then you should read Shards of Earth RIGHT NOW.

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  • Robert Wheatley
  • 21-06-2021

Annoying and dull

I was soooo tempted to give up on it a couple of hours in. I wish I did. Torturous the whole way through.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 16-07-2021

a world building exercise

This is a detailed and dry tour through a meticulously planned sci-fi universe, with a few cool ideas. It lacks a significant plot driver beyond the inciting incident and essentially just unpacks the story in laboriously mechanical steps until the end just sort of arrives. (caveat: I am more into fantasy and I actually find this to be true of a lot of sci fi so it's possible its just a segment of the genre I don't enjoy)

Found the writing itself perfectly ok except for a few instances where the author chose frankly bizarre language to elevate certain passages beyond the norm. Perhaps just me but these moments seemed genuinely bad writing. I tend to enjoy poetic language in my prose but there were some really bad descriptions which were quite jarring and needed an editor to insist on a rewrite.

I really enjoy Sophie as a narrator.

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  • Hugh O'Neill
  • 22-06-2021

Tchaikovsky on form

Great story, great narration, looking forward to seeing what happens next, and if track record is anything to go by it will be good.

1 person found this helpful

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  • andrew elder
  • 23-07-2021

glad I didn't pass this one over

cracking storyline and characters. all very much good fun for discerning sci fi fans.

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  • Jeffus
  • 21-07-2021

A bit of a trudge

I do like this author, but for me this was a trudge. I normally get engrossed in a story, but I felt I had to keep going back to try and figure out what was going on! I just couldn't build the picture in my head, which is a first for me.

I kept trying to like this story but gave up 50% the way through. The characters are fun and likeable.

Performance by Sophie was great. I was really looking forward to this, but was left, well... meh...

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  • M. Townsend
  • 18-07-2021

Fantastic

once again a brilliant story from Adrian. Great narration by Sophie Alfred too. I'll be reading more of these.

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  • Andrew R.
  • 16-07-2021

Another absorbing book from Tchaikovsky

I found this book difficult to stop listening to. Great characters, fascinating world, good story.

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  • Matt Carter
  • 11-07-2021

Trying a bit too hard for my liking.

The story line is promising. However I felt that the feminism was ludicrously contrived and the character development was problematic. I can understand why some listeners would want to give up early. I did, but decided to stick with it. I can't say I was rewarded richly.
Sophie Alfred delivers a very good performance that lifted the story enough to make this book worthwhile.

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  • P. FORDE
  • 10-07-2021

A decent listen,

I have loved many of the authors previous books, this seemed bigger Andrew n scope and less polished than previous masterpieces. I can imagine the series will allow more depth to be added and more space for us to learn about this universe. The many different races were all kind of thrown at you , a case of too much too soon for me. Probably says more about my limitations than the author to be fair .

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