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Capital in the Twenty-First Century Audiobook

Capital in the Twenty-First Century

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Publisher's Summary

What are the grand dynamics that drive the accumulation and distribution of capital? Questions about the long-term evolution of inequality, the concentration of wealth, and the prospects for economic growth lie at the heart of political economy. But satisfactory answers have been hard to find for lack of adequate data and clear guiding theories. In Capital in the Twenty-First Century, Thomas Piketty analyzes a unique collection of data from 20 countries, ranging as far back as the 18th century, to uncover key economic and social patterns. His findings will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality.

Piketty shows that modern economic growth and the diffusion of knowledge have allowed us to avoid inequalities on the apocalyptic scale predicted by Karl Marx. But we have not modified the deep structures of capital and inequality as much as we thought in the optimistic decades following World War II. The main driver of inequality - the tendency of returns on capital to exceed the rate of economic growth - today threatens to generate extreme inequalities that stir discontent and undermine democratic values. But economic trends are not acts of God. Political action has curbed dangerous inequalities in the past, Piketty says, and may do so again.

A work of extraordinary ambition, originality, and rigor, Capital in the Twenty-First Century reorients our understanding of economic history and confronts us with sobering lessons for today.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2014 the President and Fellows of Harvard College (P)2014 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"L.J. Ganser's voice and accents are superb, and emphasis is well placed." (AudioFile)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.6 (44 )
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4.5 (36 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Jacob 30/05/2016
    Jacob 30/05/2016 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "not especially well suited to audio"

    understandable. not too technical, but very detailed with lots of numbers. perhaps better in print.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Derek Holder 22/01/2015
    Derek Holder 22/01/2015
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    "Compelling argument to change society"

    Just need to get the broader population to read this comprehensive treatise, so a more successful and just society can be achieved.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brett 07/05/2017
    Brett 07/05/2017 Member Since 2016
    ratings
    REVIEWS
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    "Required reading"

    I made the mistake of listening to rather than reading this brilliant book. With the prevalence of numbers, equations and graphs it would have been better on the page. That said, it is so clearly written that I was still able to follow and absorb the dense content on audio.

    This should be required reading for everyone. The breadth and depth of research is incredible, regardless of what you make of Picketty's final suggestions, which he largely cordons off to the closing chapters. This is the ultimate 'step back and see the big picture' explanation of wealth, wages, taxes and the historic interplay thereof. For an economic layman such as myself I now feel like I have a grasp on a subject that is mystified for most of us but affects all of us. In fact, money dictates our lives but we barely understand and certainly don't question the system that distributes it. Another way to think about it: You see that the childish bickering of the daily political news cycle and think you understand economics. Reading the book is stepping back and seeing that the children are all in the same plane as it spirals out of control. Too few people are talking in these broader terms but it's critical that everyone becomes economically literate and this book is the best avenue to do so that I know of. Read it and recommend it to everyone.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stan 20/02/2016
    Stan 20/02/2016 Member Since 2017
    HELPFUL VOTES
    5
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    "Tough subject well presented"

    Capital in the 21st century: who thought id occasionally laugh to myself. I'm not a person who has studied economics, but I found this interesting, comprehensible and greatly deepening of my understanding.

    The reader did a great job of giving coherence to a challenging read.

    The subject matter is compelling - is capital wealth inequality inevitable and what can be done about it. The solution he proposes is almost utopian, though certainly technically feasible.

    A fascinating read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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  • Kazuhiko
    TUXEDO PARK, NY, United States
    14/06/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Audio format still useful to get the gist of it"

    I agree with the other reviewer who warned that the PDF has 106 pages of figures and tables and that the audio format may not be the best way to "read" this book.

    However, in my case, there is no way for me, who is not an economist or a student, to get through 685 pages (577 pages of main text and figures plus notes, index, etc.) in the hardcover copy just by, uh, reading. While the audiobook's 25 hours is longer than the length of an average audiobook, I got through it in less than 10 days just by listening during my daily commute and chores, and I feel I got the gist of the content. It was interesting enough and, I felt I missed some important aspects of the argument depicted in the figures, so I went out and got a hardcopy and a notebook so that I can even take notes. Yes, this audiobook got me interested in this book.

    An unexpected bonus of this book for me was the author's references to the characters and the financial/societal backdrops of stories by Jane Austen and Honoré de Balzac. I did not realize how much I missed and did not comprehend the important nuances of the stories from the 19th centuries world (or 18th or 20th for that matter). We don't usually pay attention to how culture is influenced by the distribution of capital in the society and how that affects day-to-day mood of people in it.

    I noticed that this book has been greatly politicized. But to me, the book simply provides DATA-DRIVEN analyses and recommendations for a fair society.

    83 of 92 people found this review helpful
  • Madeleine
    London, United Kingdom
    22/05/14
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    Performance
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    "The Financial Times' Critique Doesn't Detract"

    It is a deep shame that the Financial Times' critique of Piketty's data is going to put some people off from buying and listening to this book, because a few quibbles about a very small amount of the data (on the UK only) doesn't detract from the validity of this detailed piece of analysis. It won't matter that many other well-respected economists defend Piketty's use of the data, or the robustness of his argument. For the readers of the FT, for those who represent the top 10% of weathholders, or those who aspire to be one of them, this book is a fundamental threat to their plans.

    It's a long book, and it takes some concentration to listen to. Looking at the linked PDFs help to bring the stats and numbers to life. But I found it incredibly worthwhile. The central argument - that R>G (capital always trumps growth) is successfully and persuasively argued six ways from Sunday. And that is something not even Piketty's most vehement detractors can argue against.

    Nor did I find Piketty's conclusions and suggestions even close to being the 'radical marxist' ones that he's been accused of holding by the press. He's conscious of the fundamental value of entrepreneurship, of a vibrant market.

    When all is said and done, this book will polarize its readers along ideological lines. Because ultimately he's asking the question: what do we want our society to look like? He argues very persuasively that many of the ways we have sought to establish fairness and meritocracy in society have been ineffective in the long run.

    This book threatens those who continue to perpetuate the myth that there are even playing fields: that financial success is based on merit, that opportunity is available to everyone, that trickle-down economics works, that education is the great leveler. There are good reasons why certain groups find this book threatening. It erodes the very thin veneer that the free market is truly free.

    But it is also a very optimistic book. Piketty offers some very 'unradical' solutions for how to mitigate the problem of rapidly accelerating wealth concentration. It's not a 'downer' at all.

    The narration is good for such a long and complex book. Well chosen to be easy on the ears but still engage the concentration. I found it well worth the credit and the time I spent on it.

    129 of 146 people found this review helpful
  • Darwin8u
    Mesa, AZ, United States
    25/05/14
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    "Hottest Economic Beach Read of the Season"

    This is one of those scholarly books that seem to end up being accidental cultural markers of time and place. I'm pretty sure Piketty wanted his book to be read/discussed/debated, and Belnap/Harvard Press certainly wanted it to be bought. But, I'm pretty sure neither the author or the publisher was expecting it to do sell like it did (whether it gets read is another matter). My guess is this book will stimulate a lot of debate about the real nature and scope of income and capital inequality AND debate about the proper roll of government in addressing these issues.

    What I loved about this book was Piketty's voice. His narrative style. The fact he rejected the theoretical speculation favored by a lot of modern economists and instead went with a historical and data-centric narrative, gave this book juice. He wrote an economics book that demands to be read. I loved how he used literature (Balzac and Austen) as reference points for his thesis about the challenges with income and capital disparities between the 1% and the lower 50%. I loved his boldness. I mean really, it takes some scholarly, economic balls to name your book 'Capital'. It is like walking into a Liverpool pub with a Manchester Untied shirt on. Piketty was provocative right from the start.

    Why didn't I rate this higher? I thought his proscriptive approach (Part IV) was a bit naive. I get what he is trying to do. He is setting the flag at the ideal point and letting the politics take care of itself, but his ideal isn't really even on this planet (not even on Planet France). I'm not sure the governing class in any of the major nations he dealt with will ever be ready for a large-scale capital tax, or a global system of taxing and studying incomes. There just isn't any stomach for that. Perhaps I'm a pessimist, but I think we are already governed by system of economic élite domination. It is more likely that a natural disaster, world war, or years of inflation are way more likely to change the current and growing capital inequality in the US and Europe than any preventative, rational, or progressive tax on wealth.

    We can barely politically stomach a slight increase to capital gains/dividend tax rates without shutting down government and calls to impeach our president. A one-time, double-digit tax on wealth just won't happen in my lifetime. When 97% of scientists warn us about global warming, but because of vested energy interests and media complicity we find half of our nation believing it is all hype as the poles melt, what hope do we have in preventing millionaires and billionaires from accumulating more wealth? Most will remain ignorant of the problem, apathetic about how that type of income disparity harms democracy, and mostly antagonistic about changing what is perceived to be a meritocracy for a redistributive tax solution. Just not going to happen. I can't see it happening in France, let alone Britain, China or the US.

    But that is just me venting my frustrations. The future IS the sole property of the future. I might be wrong. For the most part the book is already doing what he wanted. He's got FT writing and challenging his data. He has Paul Krugman giving supporting data. I'm reading his book instead of a Dan Brown novel. So, my bitching aside, his book has already done 10x what it had every practical right to do. It might just end up being the next John Rawls tome, read by economists, politicians and those tired of Dan Brown novels. I sure hope so.

    92 of 109 people found this review helpful
  • Lawrence
    Monroeville, PA, United States
    20/06/14
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    "Worth the time and money"

    I gave this audiobook 5 stars even though it's not perfect. Here's why.

    Obviously audiobook is not the perfect format for a wonky macroeconomic tome with lots of graphs and numbers. Even though it comes with pdf files for the charts, that's not much help when you're listening in the car. But the glass of water half full is that I wouldn't have had the time to read this book, so listening is better than nothing. And this book has great merit.

    We've all read the criticism of the author's predictions and extrapolations. That was predictable because of the reflexive reaction by conservatives, and also the carping economists who would never dream of having a best seller on their hands, thus turning into to haters.

    Even if you ignore the author's prediction that US wealth is and will continue to become more concentrated in the clutches of the one-percenters, this book is valuable for its fascinating explanation of the history of wealth stratification. That alone taught me a great deal and helps explain where any why the world economy is. In brief, wealth has always tended to rise to the top. It was only because of the "economic shocks" of the two World Wars that the American and European middle classes got a temporary bigger piece of the pie. Add to this the fact that emerging economies are merely catching up to us explains why Americans have anxiety about not being so far ahead of the rest of the world.

    This book is a great history lesson. Don't prejudge it just because, in the end, the author makes some value judgments. Learning is great fun. At least I think so.

    22 of 27 people found this review helpful
  • Ryan
    Somerville, MA, United States
    18/06/14
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    Story
    "Wall, meet writing"

    Spoiler alert: the takeaway from Thomas Piketty's dry but much-discussed book is what most citizens of the developed world already know: income and wealth inequality in first world countries, particularly the United States, are at levels not seen since the Gilded Age. As much as I've personally benefitted from globalism and technology, it’s obvious that the lion’s share of the profits from these trends has gone to a small elite, while many Americans are being left behind in an economy that no longer places great value on their skills (or gives a damn about educating their kids).

    No doubt, the timing of the book’s publication has something to do with the big splash it made -- these are clearly issues on a lot of minds -- but Piketty brings some cool analysis to the current reality, helping the reader understand how to see it in terms of historical data. As he argues, all economic evidence suggests that this disparity is likely to continue to grow, driving modern countries towards a form of society not seen since 19th century Europe. There, he shows, there was less economic growth than in the 20th century, which meant that a small upper class that controlled most of the capital received most of the income, consolidating its dominance through inheritance. Piketty brilliantly illustrates this point with references to classic 19th century novels, wherein protagonists aren’t trying to better themselves in careers in which advancement is limited, but are focused on marrying well. Only the shock of two world wars ended this reality, creating a few decades of growth-through-rebuilding and relatively egalitarian prosperity for Western Europe and the US.

    Piketty dives down into the weeds of numerical data, graphs, charts, and comparison tables to make his point, which doesn’t always make for an ideal audiobook listen. Though there’s a PDF supplement, dedicated readers might want to get the book in print. Still, the gist is clear. We can no longer count on the rapid expansion and population growth that drove the wheels of US industry in earlier days. Return on capital is now a better bet than return on growth in most sectors of a 21st century non-emerging economy, with the start-up costs for high-tech industries or rental properties favoring the already wealthy. Even the apparent exceptions, such as software development (my own field), kind of prove the rule, in the sense that they only provide jobs for a small class of highly-skilled workers, sometimes to the detriment of the less-skilled.

    However, Piketty’s proposed solutions, as much as I agree with their goals, seem naive given current politics. He advocates more confiscatory taxes on the global top 1%, more transparency in the financial systems of all countries, and stronger international laws related to seizing the assets of tax dodgers. I don’t know about his fellow French citizens, but to even suggest to a certain segment of the US electorate that their country might not actually be a meritocracy, or that it be more subject to some international body of law, would trigger instant howling outrage. Never mind that most of that group will never be wealthy themselves -- they would still rather live in a decaying shack, imagining their interests to be aligned with those of the billionaire Koch Brothers, than ever agree with some “socialist” French academic.

    Piketty emphasizes his faith in democracy, but there are a few things I wish he’d discussed more, even if they fall outside the purview of economics. The long-term implications of technological advances on the job market. The tendency of big government and big business to end up in bed with each other. How the people can take back ownership of the political system and the machinery of production without going down the failed route of Communism.

    Still, I’m glad this book is being talked about. If the Boomer Generation is still earnestly clinging to the “American Dream” ideals it once knew, it’s pretty clear to younger generations that the system isn’t so meritocratic or upwardly mobile as it once was. I think that Piketty, a Gen-Xer himself, is speaking more to this demographic than the one currently in charge. After all, to quote a certain Gen-X musical, the aging Koch brothers are “just for now”.

    That said, your kids might give some thought to marrying one of their heirs.

    29 of 36 people found this review helpful
  • serine
    ARDMORE, PA, United States
    23/01/16
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    "worth the time"

    I liked this book a great deal. Initially, I wasn't quite sure if I would be interested in reading the entire book -- it's quite long and it includes a lot of information about finance, which is not usually something that draws me in -- but I enjoyed every page. Even when the author gave the reader permission to skip ('If you are familiar with x concept, feel free to move to the next section"), I remained engaged with the material. Piketty is great writer -- marrying finance, Jane Austin novels, culture, and various other tidbits, which culminated in an extremely thorough, yet readable, work.

    There are always so many questions I ask myself about the state of money, debt, and equality on a global level but never quite have the answers to. Piketty addresses an astounding number of concerns about our global economy. I would like to have seen him delve into a few discussions in more detail. He was heavy on the facts about finance and less so about the origins of inequality. However the book was so long; perhaps what I am asking for would be another book in and of itself. My one regret was not taking notes.

    Excellent work. I recommend to anyone interested in how money is acquired, accumulated, grown, disbursed, kept in the hands of one group/individual or another. Piketty discusses who has the money, what impact their wealth has on the world at large, what should or should not be done so that the money can help the masses but also remain concentrated enough to fund space, education, etc.

    As an aside, it was interesting for me to read about the same pattern, in which over and over rich individuals who amass great fortunes and get to decide what advancement will take place on a national and even global level. For example, Andrew Carnegie is portrayed as a careless tyrant who grew his fortune, only to give it to the masses in controlled, thought out ways that changed the face of education, the space program, and so on. Bill Gates is doing the same thing now. Mark Zukerberg just made the news for allocating his 45 billion dollar fortune to various causes.

    Absolutely worth your time, money, and effort to read this book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Omno
    2/12/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Skip it unless you have a masters in economics"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    Content is too dense and not consumable via an audio book. Definitely not "entry level" - you'll need to be an economist to know what this book is about


    What could Thomas Piketty and Arthur Goldhammer (translator) have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

    Slow down


    Would you be willing to try another one of L. J. Ganser’s performances?

    No


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • hector
    Mexico DF, Mexico
    20/04/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Too techical"

    I found it very interesting but maybe too technical, not easy or "fun"; its more like a textbook , making reference to graphics and economic formulas throughout the entire book. At the end the message is very clear and helps to understand how the money has moved towards the higher end of the pyramid, and will happen more and more unless we have major structural reforms.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Helen Feddema
    Kerhonkson, NY USA
    4/03/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Insighful and fascinating book"

    Not the usual dull academic tome, this book is well written (and well translated) -- so fascinating a listen that I found myself staying in the car to finish a chapter from time to time. I learned much about capital, income and the relationships between them -- a real eye-opener.

    I had pretty much no interest in this topic before -- that has now changed. I tried the book because I saw Thomas Piketty on a morning TV show, and he was so engaging that I decided to try the book -- I am very glad I did.

    The book has lots of statistics (of course!) -- the tables and charts are provided in a PDF, so you can download and print them for reference. But it also deals with social history and literature, using the novels of Balzac, Proust and Jane Austen for insight into the lives of people of different classes in previous centuries, especially their relationship to capital ownership, interest on capital, and income.

    The narrator's lively tone was perfect for the book. His pronunciation of French and other European names was very good.

    Try it -- even if you think you won't like it. You might be pleasantly surprised.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • S. Olsen
    9/10/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great Research and questionable conclusions"
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    Yes, I believe it is good to hear from all different sides of an argument. The book included some very interesting research to help shed light on the challenge of inequality. The first half that covered more of the research I very much enjoyed. The second half where he drew conclusions from his work and made a number of value judgements frustrated me. But the research alone is worth it and the reader was excellent.


    Would you be willing to try another book from Thomas Piketty and Arthur Goldhammer (translator) ? Why or why not?

    Maybe, not right away.


    Was Capital in the Twenty-First Century worth the listening time?

    This is questionable. The book is very long and although it continued to present new ideas as it progressed, I became fatigued and was waiting for it to end while still wanting to get to the finish line.


    Any additional comments?

    I want to explain what frustrated me because much of the book was really good. Toward the end he started to draw inferences and include many value judgements that went into his recommendations with as much force as the research. He also started to present facts and give a few reasons or possible explanations for the results and then would simply say but the best solution is x without any reasons why he chose one explanation over another except that it fit his case. I felt the research was interesting but he seemed to force it into a single solution to make a stronger case for very high individual tax rates and a global tax on wealth. Describing that we have inequality and showing the growing problem was a lot easier than giving single solutions. Especially when those solutions left out a lot of analysis on the strengths and weaknesses of the recommendations. Yet that was the push towards the end to explain the recommendation without really proving the his solution was best. Still, whether you agree or not with him, he presents a a thought out, researched opinion that I think adds to the general discussion.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
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  • David
    London, United Kingdom
    8/08/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "The most talked about non-fiction book this year"

    This is a mega-work - both in length and impact. The most detailed study of the distribution of wealth for decades - a monumental work of scholarship - and a powerful polemic for the effective global taxation of wealth. It's not the ideal Audible Book because you need to print off loads of PDF charts to really make sense of it, which, since I was listening to it at the gym, was a bit of a problem. Also because it has provoked a lot of debate, including over the accuracy of some of the data, you may prefer to spend your time tuning into the debate on-line; unless you are a professional economist, in which case you will have already read it and have an annotated hard-back copy on your shelf. I committed to the twenty plus hours of listening and learnt a lot. I especially like some of the incidental historical detail and the sections where he goes off-piste and gives us his views on the Euro crisis. I was convinced by both the analysis and the polemic. He is open enough to put all his data on-line. The critique by the FT's economics editor casts doubt on some of it, but Piketty's response is strong, and the fundamental argument that inequality is growing because the returns to capital are growing at a faster rate than the standard of living of the majority of the population survives intact.

    15 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • Jeannie
    16/08/15
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    Performance
    Story
    "Great book - pity about the editing of the reading"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Capital in the Twenty-First Century to be better than the print version?

    It was great to have them both, and to be able to switch between then with WhisperSync, but there were so many glitches in the reading that it was often difficult to understand the point Piketty was making.

    The text was translated from the French, and the sentences were long - very long - and very complex. Ganser would start a sentence with a particular intonation, and then realise half way through the sentence that it wasn't going to end quite as he thought, so he would either change his intonation, which made it difficult to follow, as the two halves of the sentence no longer 'belonged' together, or he wouldn't change his intonation, which would make it almost impossible to understand the grammar of the sentence.

    I have every sympathy with his predicament, as it is a long and complicated book, and it is impossible to get everything right the first time - but if the audio publisher had been prepared to re-record and splice in more coherent narration at significant points in the text, it would have made such a difference.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Capital in the Twenty-First Century?

    Realising that economics is not just an objective science, but depends on your point of view and what you think is important about human life.


    Who might you have cast as narrator instead of L. J. Ganser?

    His voice was great, and the performance full of enthusiasm, so if the audio publisher had done a bit more work on the editing of the recording, I would think him ideal.


    If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    Not sure it would make a very good film!


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Sina Bahrami
    London
    7/01/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Narrator accent"

    The narrator pronounced every French word with a ridiculous faux-French accent. Otherwise a great book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Alexander
    6/06/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A momentous, highly enjoyable book."
    Would you consider the audio edition of Capital in the Twenty-First Century to be better than the print version?

    Unfortunately, as there are many references to graphs, the print edition might be preferable to the audio version, but the performance adequately describes the content of the graphs so the listener is not at a loss.


    Any additional comments?

    This book has rightly inspired a heated debate which hopefully will lead to some very significant reforms in the way our modern economy works.

    6 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Mr Simon W D Borland
    12/07/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "excellent data driven analysis and insight"

    I was really impressed with the analysis and insight of this work. Excellent explanations for the less economically aware like myself, it was easy to understand and very balanced. highly recommended

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    greenwich, london
    7/06/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "eye opening"

    very interesting explanation of the functioning of the capitalist economies. subsequent commentary has criticized the work but the underlying thesis is sound and needs to be widely discussed.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Ivan
    27/11/16
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    "A must read/listen!"

    Finally! An analysis getting rid of troublesome assumptions affecting other economist's work; Piketty makes sense of numbers and history , does NOT try to support a theory with numbers rather infer the learnings of history and numbers to suggest what could be best done to avoid dangerous widening of the divide between the ultra-rich and the rest . A massive work, result of a massive research effort.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Eliel Cohen
    23/04/16
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    Performance
    Story
    "important research"

    I am a big fan of Yanks Varoufakis so it is interesting that he criticises Picketty. not being an expert i can learn from and appreciate both of them - from where I am sitting they are on the same side. This book is slow going and by no means a popular economic book. but neither is the theory particularly difficult. It is the excellent but relatively simple treatment of the best available data and letting that data speak for itself, with some interesting and well-written analysis along the way - that makes this book such an achievement.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Qian
    16/04/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "this book is too complicated for relaxing"
    Who was your favorite character and why?

    ?


    Who might you have cast as narrator instead of L. J. Ganser?

    Some less draggy accent, with a more serious, firm, less high pitched tone, free of strange french pronunciations.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No. Not a story book. Too exhausting for one go.


    Any additional comments?

    Accent is terrible.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Mr J Phan
    25/03/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Summary - Boring bit important"
    Where does Capital in the Twenty-First Century rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    This book ranks in the top 20 in must read books. It's dry, a lot of statistics and analysis. Its not for the average reader because of the complex argument Thomas Piketty makes. However it's important, to a maths geek or a serious investor/economist. This is very important book to understand. Warren buffet talks about Moats, well Piketty's book shows how wealthy individuals can create one around their assets and business to enforce their will.


    What was most disappointing about Thomas Piketty and Arthur Goldhammer (translator) ’s story?

    There are a lack of examples, however given Thomas background and the nature of the book. I don't believe the masses will read this.

    This book is aimed at a serious investor or the intellectual dinner table debate.


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    slow, boring tone


    If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    How the wealthy can set things up to screw everyone.


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