Quarterly Essays

46 books in series
4.5 out of 5 stars 412 ratings

Quarterly Essay 1: In Denial Publisher's Summary

In this national best seller, Robert Mane attacks the right-wing campaign against the "Bringing Them Home" report that revealed how thousands of Aborigines had been taken from their parents. What was the role of Paddy McGuinness as editor of Quadrant? How reliable was the evidence that led newspaper columnists from Piers Akerman in the Sydney Daily Telegraph to Andrew Bolt in the Melbourne Herald Sun to deny the gravity of the injustice done?

In a powerful indictment of past government policies towards the Aborigines, Robert Manne has written a brilliant polemical essay which doubles as a succinct history of how Aborigines were mistreated and an exposure of the ignorance of those who want to deny that history.

©2001, 2008 Robert Manne (P)2011 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd
Show More Show Less
    • Quarterly Essay 1: In Denial

    • The Stolen Generations and the Right
    • By: Robert Manne
    • Narrated by: Robert Manne
    • Length: 4 hrs and 22 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    In this national best seller, Robert Mane attacks the right-wing campaign against the "Bringing Them Home" report that revealed how thousands of Aborigines had been taken from their parents. What was the role of Paddy McGuinness as editor of Quadrant? How reliable was the evidence that led newspaper columnists from Piers Akerman in the Sydney Daily Telegraph to Andrew Bolt in the Melbourne Herald Sun to deny the gravity of the injustice done?

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Absolutely brilliant

    • By Melissa on 14-11-2016

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 19

    • Relaxed & Comfortable: The Liberal Party's Australia
    • By: Judith Brett
    • Narrated by: Judith Brett
    • Length: 2 hrs and 50 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 2

    What is the Liberal Party's core appeal to Australian voters? Has John Howard made a dramatic break with the past, or has he ingeniously modernised the strategies of his party's founder, Sir Robert Menzies? For Judith Brett, the government of John Howard has done what successful Liberal governments have always done: it has presented itself as the true guardian of the national interest. Full of provocative ideas, Relaxed & Comfortable will change the way Australians see the last decade of national politics.

    Non-member price: $13.86

    • Quarterly Essay 22

    • Voting for Jesus: Christianity and Politics in Australia
    • By: Amanda Lohrey
    • Narrated by: Marie-Louise Walker
    • Length: 3 hrs and 13 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 2

    From the Hillsong Church to the Family First Party, Australia appears to be experiencing an evangelical revival. In the second Quarterly Essay for 2006, Amanda Lohrey investigates that revival - its shape and scope, and what it means for the mainstream churches and the nation's politics. She talks to young believers and analyses the machinations of the Christian Right. She discusses, with humour and insight, the appeal of the megachurch, the changing image of Jesus and the political theories of George Pell and Peter Jensen.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Excellent Essay

    • By Katherine Miranda Hudson on 13-09-2016

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 31

    • Now or Never: A Sustainable Future for Australia?
    • By: Tim Flannery
    • Narrated by: Tim Flannery
    • Length: 2 hrs and 36 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 2

    Sometime this century, after 4 billion years, some of Earth's regulatory systems will pass from control through evolution by natural selection, to control by human intelligence. Will humanity rise to the challenge? This landmark essay by Tim Flannery is about sustainability, our search for it in the 21st century, and the impact it might have on the environmental threats that confront us today. Flannery discusses in detail three potential solutions to the most pressing of the sustainability challenges: climate change.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • World change a necessity!

    • By Anonymous User on 06-02-2018

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 3: The Opportunist

    • John Howard and the Triumph of of Reaction
    • By: Guy Rundle
    • Narrated by: Guy Rundle
    • Length: 2 hrs and 38 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      1 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      1 out of 5 stars 1

    In the third Quarterly Essay of 2001, Guy Rundle comes to grips with John Howard, the prime minister who, on the eve of an election, seems to have turned round his political fortunes by spurning refugees and writing blank cheques for America's War on Terror. This is a brilliant account of John Howard's dominant ideas, his concerted "dreaming" with its emphasis on unity and national identity that reveals him to be the most reactionary PM we have ever had.

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 11

    • Whitefella Jump Up: The Shortest Way to Nationhood
    • By: Germaine Greer
    • Narrated by: Germaine Greer
    • Length: 3 hrs and 3 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In the third Quarterly Essay of 2003, Germaine Greer suggests that embracing Aboriginality is the only way Australia can fully imagine itself as a nation. In this sweeping and magisterial work, she looks at the interdependence of black and white and suggests not how the Aborigine question may be settled, but rather how a sense of being Aboriginal might save the soul of Australia. Touching on everything from Henry Lawson to multiculturalism, Greer argues that Australia must enter the Aboriginal "web of dreams".

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 26

    • His Master’s Voice: The Corruption of Public Debate under Howard
    • By: David Marr
    • Narrated by: David Marr
    • Length: 3 hrs and 4 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 6
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 5

    John Howard has the loudest voice in Australia. He has cowed his critics, muffled the press, intimidated the ABC, gagged scientists, silenced NGOs, censored the arts, prosecuted leakers, criminalised protest and curtailed parliamentary scrutiny. Though touted as a contest of values, this has been a party-political assault on Australia's liberal culture. In the name of "balance", the Liberal Party has muscled its way into the intellectual life of the country. And this has happened because we let it happen.

    • His Master’s Voice: The Corruption of Public Debate under Howard
    • By: David Marr
    • Narrated by: David Marr
    • Length: 3 hrs and 4 mins
    • Release date: 12-04-2012
    • 4 out of 5 stars 6 ratings

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 15

    • Latham's World: The New Politics of the Outsiders
    • By: Margaret Simons
    • Narrated by: Margaret Simons
    • Length: 3 hrs and 55 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    In the third Quarterly Essay of 2004, Margaret Simons takes a long hard look at Mark Latham, the self-proclaimed "club buster" and the man who would be prime minister. Few doubt Latham's intelligence and ambition, but what will this amount to in government? Simons argues that if Labor is elected, it will not be "business as usual". Rather we can expect a reformist government in the spirit - if not the letter - of Latham's political tutor, Gough Whitlam. It is also likely to be a government that has little time for the totemic issues of the Labor elites.

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 24: No Fixed Address

    • Nomads and the Fate of the Planet
    • By: Robyn Davidson
    • Narrated by: Robyn Davidson
    • Length: 2 hrs and 9 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 2

    After many thousands of years, the nomads are disappearing, swept away by modernity. Robyn Davidson has spent a good part of her life with nomadic cultures - in Australia, northwest India, Tibet and the Indian Himalayas - and she herself calls three countries home. In the last Quarterly Essay for 2006, she draws on her unique experience to delineate a vanishing way of life. In a time of environmental peril, Davidson argues that the nomadic way with nature offers valuable lessons.

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 18

    • The Worried Well: The Depression Epidemic and the Medicalisation of Our Sorrows
    • By: Gail Bell
    • Narrated by: Gail Bell
    • Length: 2 hrs and 41 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In the second Quarterly Essay of 2005, Gail Bell investigates Australia's depression epidemic. Why, she wonders, do well over a million Australians now take anti-depressant drugs? This is a fresh, frank and independent look at the depression culture and the move to medicalise sadness. Bell examines how the prescription culture operates, scrutinising the role of big drug companies and GPs and talking to those who take - and don't take - the new anti-depressants, from anxious students to lonely retirees.

    • The Worried Well: The Depression Epidemic and the Medicalisation of Our Sorrows
    • By: Gail Bell
    • Narrated by: Gail Bell
    • Length: 2 hrs and 41 mins
    • Release date: 12-04-2012
    • 4 out of 5 stars 1 rating

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 29

    • Love & Money: The Family and the Free Market
    • By: Anne Manne
    • Narrated by: Anne Manne
    • Length: 3 hrs and 34 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In Love & Money, Anne Manne looks at the religion of work - its high priests and sacrificial lambs. As family life and motherhood feel the pressure of the market, she asks whether the chief beneficiaries are self-interested employers and child-care corporations. Manne argues that devaluing motherhood - still central to so many women's lives - has done feminism few favours. For women on the frontline of the work-centred society, it has made for hard choices. Manne eloquently tells what happened when feminism adapted itself to the free market.

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 30

    • Last Drinks: The Impact of the Northern Territory Intervention
    • By: Paul Toohey
    • Narrated by: Paul Toohey
    • Length: 4 hrs
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    When Mal Brough and John Howard announced the Northern Territory intervention in mid-2007, they proclaimed a child abuse emergency. In this riveting piece of reportage and analysis, Paul Toohey unpicks the rhetoric of emergency and tracks progress. One year on, have children been saved? Will Labor continue with the intervention? What are the reasons for the social crisis and how might things be different? Toohey argues that the real issue is not sexual abuse, but rather a more general neglect of children.

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 39: Power Shift

    • Australia's Future Between Washington and Beijing
    • By: Hugh White
    • Narrated by: Hugh White
    • Length: 2 hrs and 23 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 5

    In the September Quarterly Essay, Hugh White considers Australia’s place between Beijing and Washington. As the power balance shifts, and China’s influence grows, what might this mean for the nation?Throughout our history, we have counted first on British then on American primacy in Asia. The rise of China as an economic powerhouse has challenged US dominance in the region and raised questions for Australia that go well beyond diplomacy and defence....

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 42: Fair Share

    • Country & City in Australia
    • By: Judith Brett
    • Narrated by: Judith Brett
    • Length: 2 hrs and 17 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    For many decades Australia was the country that rode on the sheep's back. No more - now we are a country of mining and services. In QE42, one of Australia's most original and respected political thinkers, Judith Brett, looks at what this has meant for the country and the city in our politics and culture.The politics of independence and dependence are complicated, as the Murray-Darling water reform shows. And the question remains: What will be the fate of rural and regional Australia?

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 32

    • American Revolution: The Fall of Wall Street and the Rise of Barack Obama
    • By: Kate Jennings
    • Narrated by: Marie-Louise Walker
    • Length: 3 hrs and 27 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Where were you when America elected Barack Obama? Kate Jennings was in New York, eyes wide open, completing her take on an amazing time: "the run-up to the election... a time when every day felt like a year and we became slightly crazed from worry but also mesmerised, unable to switch off the cable news stations, obsessively tracking the DOW, VIX, LIBOR spreads, polls in red states. So much at stake. American Revolution is a dazzling and perceptive look at the United States between hope and despair.

    Non-member price: $20.83

    • Quarterly Essay 34: Stop at Nothing: The Life and Adventures of Malcolm Turnbull

    • By: Annabel Crabb
    • Narrated by: Marie-Louise Walker
    • Length: 3 hrs and 29 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 21
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 15
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 15

    Based on extensive interviews with Turnbull as well as those who have worked with him, this is an essay full of revelations. Crabb delves into young Malcolm's university exploits - which included co-authoring a musical with Bob Ellis - and his remarkable relationship with Kerry Packer, the man for whom he was at first a prized attack dog, and then a mortal enemy. She asks whether Turnbull - colourful, aggressive, humorous and ruthless - has what it takes to re-invigorate the Australian Liberal Party in the wake of John Howard.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Very interesting

    • By Anonymous User on 20-01-2018

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 49: Not Dead Yet

    • By: Mark Latham
    • Narrated by: Robert Meldrum
    • Length: 2 hrs and 43 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    In Quarterly Essay 49, Latham argues that the time has come to go beyond criticism to solutions. In that spirit, he offers a timely assessment of the future for Labor. He examines the key challenges: the union nexus, the Keating settlement, a real education revolution, a new war on poverty, climate change, and handling the Greens. With wit and insight, he suggests that Labor's biggest problem is the steady erosion of its traditional working-class base.

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 40: Trivial Pursuit

    • Leadership and the End of the Reform Era
    • By: George Megalogenis
    • Narrated by: George Megalogenis
    • Length: 2 hrs and 32 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    In the aftermath of the 2010 election, George Megalogenis considers what has happened to politics in Australia. Have we entered a new phase with minority government and the rise of the Greens and independents? Hawke, Keating and Howard years were ones of bold reform; recently we have seen an era of power without purpose. But why? Is it down to powerful lobbies, or the media, or a failure of leadership, or all of the above? And whatever the case, how will hard decisions be taken for the future? In a brilliant analysis, Megalogenis dissects the cycle of polls, focus groups and presidential politics....

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 43: Bad News

    • Murdoch's Australian and the Shaping of The Nation
    • By: Robert Manne
    • Narrated by: Robert Manne
    • Length: 5 hrs and 32 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 4

    This year has seen unprecedented scrutiny of Rupert Murdoch’s empire in Britain. But what about in Australia, where he owns 70 per cent of the press? In Bad News, Robert Manne investigates Murdoch’s lead political voice here, the Australian newspaper, and how it shapes debate. Since 2002, under the editorship of Chris Mitchell, the Australian has come to see itself as judge, jury and would-be executioner of leaders and policies. Is this a dangerous case of power without responsibility?

    Non-member price: $4.99

    • Quarterly Essay 46: Great Expectations: Government, Entitlement and an Angry Nation

    • By: Laura Tingle
    • Narrated by: Louise Crawford
    • Length: 2 hrs and 16 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 5
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 4
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 4

    In Quarterly Essay 46 Laura Tingle shows that the answer goes to something deep in Australian culture: our great expectations of government. Since the deregulation era of the 1980s, Tingle shows, governments can do less, but we wish they could do more. From Hawke to Gillard, each prime minister has grappled with this dilemma. Keating sought to change expectations, Howard to feed a culture of entitlement, Rudd to reconceive the federation. Through all of this, and back to our origins, runs an almost childlike sense of the government as saviour and provider.

    Non-member price: $4.99

Show titles per page
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3