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The Simulation Hypothesis: An MIT Computer Scientist Shows Why AI, Quantum Physics, and Eastern Mystics All Agree We Are in a Video Game

Narrated by: Kory Getman
Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins

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Publisher's Summary

The Simulation Hypothesis, by best-selling author, renowned MIT computer scientist, and Silicon Valley video game designer Rizwan Virk, explains one of the most daring and consequential theories of our time.

Drawing from research and concepts from computer science, artificial intelligence, video games, quantum physics, and referencing both speculative fiction and ancient eastern spiritual texts, Virk shows how all of these traditions come together to point to the idea that we may be inside a simulated reality like the Matrix.

The Simulation Hypothesis is the idea that our physical reality, far from being a solid physical universe, is part of an increasingly sophisticated video game-like simulation, where we all have multiple lives, consisting of pixels with its own internal clock run by some giant Artificial Intelligence. Simulation theory explains some of the biggest mysteries of quantum and relativistic physics, such as quantum indeterminacy, parallel universes, and the integral nature of the speed of light.

“There’s a one in a billion chance we are not living in a simulation.” (Elon Musk)

“I find it hard to argue we are not in a simulation.” (Neil deGrasse Tyson)

“We are living in computer generated reality.” (Philip K. Dick)

Video game designer Riz Virk shows how the history and evolution of our video games, including virtual reality, augmented reality, artificial intelligence, and quantum computing could lead us to the point of being able to develop all encompassing virtual worlds like the Oasis in Ready Player One, or the simulated reality in The Matrix.

While the idea sounds like science fiction, many scientists, engineers, and professors have given the simulation hypothesis serious consideration. But the simulation hypothesis is not just a modern idea. Philosophers and mystics of all traditions have long contended that we are living in some kind of “illusion“ and that there are other realities which we can access with our minds.

Whether you are a computer scientist, a fan of science fiction like The Matrix movies, a video game enthusiast, or a spiritual seeker, The Simulation Hypothesis touches on all these areas, and you will never look at the world the same way again!

©2019 Rizwan Virk (P)2019 Rizwan Virk

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  • Samwell
  • 26-05-2019

A 90's thesis for a mail order university

Rizwan Virk went to MIT. If you take one thing away from this book, it'll be that fact, sprinkled constantly in between constant definitions of acronyms that anyone reading this overblown undergrad-like work, will come away with.

The first part of the book wastes our time with a history of video and arcade games. Really. No more needs to be said in what should have been a single chapter at most. Of course, if that's not enough, Virk treats you like an imbecile with definitions of terms like NPCs and pixels,

The second part is the only part that has merit, though it's a retread of what you can find online in much better YouTube videos and short articles. Putting everything together in one place is a good thing, which saved this book from a 1 star review.

Part three "educates" us about world religions and how they can map to the Simulation Theory. Again, no new ground there.

Most interesting are unexplained phenomena, which leaves you wondering why there aren't more.

This is undoubtedly the worst narration I've listened to so far in an Audible book. Random pauses are everywhere, likely while the reader is turning a page, distracted by a squirrel, or possibly some other unexplained phenomena. There's even a bunch of doubled up words (might be in the original text, to be fair), and if you don't listen to this on at least 1.5x speed, you'll be frustrated.

This is currently the best book on Simulation Hypothesis, as it's the only one to treat the subject fully, but that's not exactly a ringing endorsement.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • CCMG
  • 11-07-2019

Some technical anomalies, but stick with

In chapter three, the editor may have been asleep - there is a section around the 19 minute mark where phrases are repeated, and repeated several times. That said, the reader does a solid job and isn't offensive to listen to. Though the books first chapters feel like a videogame fanboy trying to make a case for something that is bigger than the scope of his interest in games released in the past 5 years, it eventually takes a few turns towards competent comparison between quantum indeterminacy and MMORPGs. Beyond that, it is on the author and the book, which I am not reviewing here - just wanted to make a note about the production. Nonetheless nice to have book like this on Audible as it bridges some overlaps in interest and may serve as an introduction to these concepts for some audiences.

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  • darren
  • 11-07-2019

I'm a victim of an Instagram advert!

save your money, just have a look on YouTube or just Google to get the same info. clearly this book was done as a money spinner, and I fell for it
Overall this guy has interesting ideas, but my god he labours it. there's lots of errors in his reading, where a fact is read differently twice or 3 times.
the narration is terrible, far too stumbling and fast as he's clearly no experience in the art.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful