Get Your Free Audiobook

The Power of Body Language

An Ex-FBI Agent's System for Speed-Reading People
Narrated by: Joe Navarro
Length: 6 hrs and 50 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (192 ratings)

Non-member price: $62.91

After 30 days, Audible is $16.45/mo. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

Instantly discover what's really going on around you!

Know the truth before you ever hear a word!

Approximately 80% of communication is expressed nonverbally. When you know how to unlock the secrets of people's nonverbal cues, you'll always have the upper hand in any situation.

In The Power of Body Language, former FBI counterintelligence officer and recognized global expert on nonverbal behavior Joe Navarro teaches you how to "speed-read" people: decode sentiments and behaviors, avoid hidden pitfalls, and look for revealing behaviors. You will discover:

  • How the subconscious limbic system drives all body language.
  • Why the face is the least likely place to gauge a person's true feelings.
  • What thumbs, feet, and a simple handshake reveal about moods and motives.
  • The most powerful behaviors that reveal our confidence and true sentiments.
  • Simple nonverbals that instantly establish trust and communicate authority.
  • Why things taught about nonverbals in the '70s and '80s are incorrect.
  • And more!

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2009 Joe Navarro (P)2009 Nightingale Conant

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    125
  • 4 Stars
    46
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    3

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    90
  • 4 Stars
    47
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    4

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    100
  • 4 Stars
    34
  • 3 Stars
    16
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    3
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Exactly what it sais on the tin.

it was pretty good, interesting and a great narrative. i could have done without the 70's porno music between chapters though....

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

good clothe amongst the fluff

useful information thinly spread amongst (relevant) stories and examples. to get the most out of this audio I'd recommend intentional review and note-taking of the relevant chapters. Already using some of his principles.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Body language 101

What did you like best about this story?

Easy to follow examples, very easy to relate to. Instantly made me conscious of my own signals. First basic thing I noticed and put into practice was it's very fun to observe people in public especially those on mobile phones; and the incredible amount of signals the Limbic System emits.

What does Joe Navarro bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Joe doesn't try to fancy this course up which is good because It doesn't need it. He keeps the content constant and steady enough for it to be interesting. I think another reviewer disapproved of the narration. Given Joe's voice is a bit mono, I disagree, It's narrated perfectly for the type of content it is.

Any additional comments?

Knock down the price of this audiobook, I think it's like 40+ dollars in Australia...Lots of parental examples I didn't relate to also, but still not enough to knock a star off.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

good story, horrible music

the 80s music between each segment was really off putting. certainly made me feel like I was listening to a book or talk from about 30 years ago. made me doubt the information because it could be out of date

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I cant stop playing this book, very informative.

fantastic, easy to follow, speaks at a level everyone can understand, listened to it 10 times and still play it on the road trips.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Enjoyable

One of the simpler psychology books, very easy to understand and easy to follow. Slow start but worth persisting with.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

pretty good, little lacking in content. worth it.

good listen, needed more specific points. infrequent music is cheesy as hell, and probably about 40 years old.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Incredible knowledge

This is a massive eye opener to reading people in day to day life. A lifetime of studying human behaviour is put across by Joe in a relaxed easy to listen to manor. Thanks Joe. 👍

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great basic intro to the body language topic

This book is very clear and well narrated. you can tell the difference when the actual author does the voice over.

It gives many easy to apply techniques that you can use in your everyday life.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Invaluable information

Invaluable information from a extremely intelligent and experienced man. wish they taught this in schools.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Allyssia
  • Allyssia
  • 04-10-2018

(...) and in the end, they would confess.

In order to better remember and use as future reference, I've made a summary with all main contents. It doesn't by any mean replace the reading, but it helps remember future useful hints! Hope it's helpful!

ABOUT OUR BRAIN
*The hippocampus learns and expands, the amygdala senses danger and helps to keep us safe. The limbic system is designed to react, it's subconscious and non cognitive. Good emotions are dealt by the limbic system as well.
The neocortex is the cognitive part. It allows us to create things, think and lie. Boo!
*Whenever we feel a threat, we have freeze (predators sometimes don't chase things that don't move), flight (the modern equivalent is not running but distancing yourself) and fight reactions (nowadays usually manifests by arguing). 3 Fs. Not 2.

ANALYSING BEHAVIOR
*Behaviors can basically be categorized into comfort and discomfort demonstrations.
*Are behaviors limbic or cultural? Cultural= something that has been taught to us as a common reaction.
Limbic= it's easier to look for clusters to identify limbic reactions. Its reactions also happens very fast, immediately.
*Fragment information - in order to know what generates which feeling, fragment the information and discuss part by part. It will help you read the reactions way better.
*Pacifier reactions can either be used to add physical comfort to good situations or to ease stress. It can manifest through sucking your thumb, playing with your hair or touching your ears etc... Context matters.
*Happy couples have synchronized body patterns, they walk at the same pace and have similar body movements.

ANALYSING THE BODY
FEET 1)when couples get along their feet often touch.
2)When we are comfortable around people, our feet tends to go towards their direction.
3)When someone is empathetic towards someone else, the feet points to them. If they aren't keen to the person, it will point towards the exit.

LEGS 1)Crossing your legs is usually a demonstration of comfort and trust since it breaks your sense of balance.
2)When we cross our legs towards someone it is a sign we trust and like this person the best.
3)Usually depressed people won't bounce their legs or feet because they are so overwhelmed by their emotions they can't "defy gravity", like they are carrying all the weight of the world on their back.
4)Our legs are usually used to defend us. When we are relaxed we spread them a little wider but if we feel tense it closes shut.

HIPS 1) we may lean our hips towards someone to welcome them, but if our feet aren't pointed to their direction, it shows it was just out of politeness.
2) Hip contact is used to demonstrate affection.
3)Hips can also sign discomfort towards what someone is hearing - If the person is agitated it can be one major indicator that the situation is bothering them.
4)Hands on hips with elbows sticking out is one way to demonstrate we have an issue with someone or something. If the legs are also slightly spread apart it shows a very territorial pose. It universally transmits power issues. If the thumbs are pointed to the back it indicates there is an issue here. If the thumbs are pointed forward it changes the impression and makes you look inquisitive rather than intrusive.
5)Thucking the thumbs into the pants or belt in an equivalent distance is a way of framing the genitals and showing sexual interest.

TORSO 1)It transmits how we present our health to the world, as well as our youth.
2)The torso is also called the human billboard because we can "decorate" it in many ways. It can also be an indicative of social status (i.e. imagine a polo shirt with a fancy logo)
3) Looking at the torso also can indicate who this person is, what kind of position they have in society, how their self esteem is etc...
***4)The way we treat our torsos shows how we perceive ourselves
5)When people can see our torsos they perceive us as being more honest. Hiding our torsos is a way of showing we are not approachable, whether it may be because we feel superior or uncomfortable.
6)Positioning our torsos towards someone is called ventral fronting. The extreme opposite, turning our back to someone is ventral denial.
7)Visible tattoos, specially on the torso, nowadays, are perceived negatively in areas in which a high degree of trust is necessary

SHOULDERS 1)When asked a question and only one shoulder comes next to the ear, it's probably less likely that the answer will be truthful. When both shoulders come next to the ear, it's seen as more credible. One explanation is that their limbic system is coherent.
2)The turtle effect, in which the shoulders come next to the ear and the head comes down, indicates that what is being said isn't that strong.

NECK 1)Touching our necks is a kind of pacifying reaction. We often see this in relation to a stressful event.
2)Covering part of your neck shows something negative bothered you. Not covering it when talking about something negative can indicate lying.
3)When we're very comfortable we tend to tilt our heads.
4)The head going from tilt to straight tends to show something went wrong.
5)Tilting our heads to everyone makes people uncomfortable because that's a sign of affection.

HANDS 1)When we like someone we tend to touch them with our full hands. When we don't care, we use only or fingertips.
2)Putting the index and the thumb together indicates precision
3) When we are stippling (putting or fingertips together but not palms, hands spread out) indicates we're very sure about what we're talking about.
4)When we like something, our thumbs tend to appear.
5)One of the ways of showing lack of confidence is hiding our thumbs.
6)Preening behaviors are often associated with good health and with respect; since we usually try to look good when someone matters to us.
7)Preening however can also be bad; doing so while the person speaks without acknowledging them is a sign of disrespect
8)it's also possible to pacify others with our hands, which is a way of pacifying ourselves. We can also achieve the same results by pacifying animals.
9)Handshakes are reflections of the society we grew up in. In some cultures, a strong handshake is important, in some others, a weak one is the social norm. There are some cultures in which you don't even do handshakes at all.
10)One interesting thing to do, is to mimic their handshake in order to create empathy.
11)One rude handshake however, is to use both your hands to cover their hand during the handshake. It's perceived very negatively. This is called the politician handshake. If you feel like you need more touch, then touch the shoulder or the elbow, but don't cover their hands. Also, make eye contact.

PALMS 1)Palms up can send a subtle message of weaknesses, like you're asking for a favor or begging to be believed. Palms down can mean we are very secure of our message and that we are sure about it.

ARMS 1)Putting our arms behind our back and holding our fingers is called the regal position and the message is: don't come near me. It happens because it's the opposite of putting our arms up and forward, which can mean we're trying to reach for someone or something.
2)Hugging ourselves our constantly needing coats when it's not particularly cold is a sign we're trying to protect ourselves.

POSTURE (how we stand) 1) One way of showing respect is adjusting to the pace of walking of those who they perceive to be superior. (I.e. no one walks in front of the Queen on England)
2) The way you stand also is going to impact a lot the credibility of your message.
***3)Criminals target individuals based on how they stand. They go after people who look weak and unaware of their surroundings.
4)The more we spread our legs and body the more territorial we look.

ANALYSING THE FACE

FOREHEAD 1)When we look at the forehead we can have a very accurate notion whether stress or comfort is present.

EYES 1)Covering the eyes is a blocking mechanism. When we hear something we don't like, we close our eyes for at least longer than a blink.
2)When the eyelids come down and remain low for a long period of time it can indicate avoidance and discomfort.
3)When we see something we like our pupils dilate. When we see something we don't like, our pupils constrict.
3)Arching eyebrows (lasts 1/10 of a second) is called the eyebrow flash and it can speed how relationships are established and increase empathy.
4)Eye aversion has more to do with social constructs than whether we're telling the truth or not. Sometimes people avoid looking eye to eye because they understand that as a sign of respect.

NOSE 1)When we are stressed the nose tends to get very dry, therefore more sensitive which can induce the person to touch their nose.
2)When we get excited about something or when we're going to do something physical, the wings of the nose dilate. This can also be a sign the person is going to run or attack us.

MOUTH 1) Social smiles move the corner of the mouth towards the ear but the eyes don't present the crow effect, they don't change, the eyes remain still.
2)When people hive their lips it's an indicator of deep discomfort
4)When the lips are full, relaxed and warm is a sign that there is comfort.
5)When we purse our lips it's a sign of disagreement
6)Yawning excessively is a possible sign that the person is under stress.
7) To exhale with puff cheeks is a sign of relief
8)When we're strong and confident our jaws come out. When we are weak and insecure we put our chins in.

102 of 104 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Jeanne
  • Jeanne
  • 13-05-2016

Helped me with my disabled daughter!!!!

I decided to purchase this book to help me with my disabled daughter. My daughter is severely disabled and her ability to communicate when she is in distress is limited. She has lots of conditions including autism and OCD which give her much distress. I was looking for any tools to help me recognize when she is first experiencing stress so maybe I could intervene before she goes into full blown mania. I was not disappointed! Mr. Navarro gave me some valuable tools to use in observing my daughter's behavior. The suggestions in the book have already helped me recognize early stress behaviors in my daughter.

This book also gave me tools which I am excited to start practicing when observing other people's behavior. This could be fun! ;-)

The narration of the book is in a slow, methodical speech pattern which may annoy some people. However, I found that this type of delivery helped me better process the weighty information.

Thank you, Mr. Navarro, for writing this book!!! I am about to listen to the book again.

23 of 24 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Kindle Customer
  • Kindle Customer
  • 09-11-2015

Reread of What Everybody's Saying

Informative but needs a professional reader. Slowww and droll read. First book, What Everybody's Saying is much better.

45 of 48 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for seana
  • seana
  • 26-03-2015

A Must Read for Every Human

Terrific (& valuable) information!
The one (& only) problem I had with this audio book was the author's speed in narration...it was painfully slow (he should've used someone else). I adjusted the speed in my Audible app to 1.25 & it worked like a DREAM!
With the speed up to par I could actually concentrate on what the author was saying...& the information was AMAZING!
You will really come away from this with concrete knowledge on the "how's" & "why's" of all types of body language a person will use during a conversation!
I cannot believe I didn't know this stuff...& the meaning behind different gestures, twitches, motions, pauses (I could go on & on...there's SO much to learn) that people use EVERY DAY, ALL DAY!!!
What else can I say...? An amazing book!!!

23 of 26 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Kip
  • Kip
  • 10-04-2015

Same as his other book "What every body is saying"

Would you try another book from Joe Navarro and/or Joe Navarro?

This is my second book by Mr. Navarro because I enjoyed the first one I downloaded. There is no new information in this book. It is the exact same set of stories and examples in a format that is a bit more "raw" or unpolished than the other book. If he comes up with anything new I will check it out.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Huge disappointment it is the same as his other title just recorded by him.

34 of 39 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for John b S
  • John b S
  • 05-03-2018

good info bad narration

Any additional comments?

this is the second book I read form Joe N, obviously I though enough about the author to read more. Listening to him read was painful I found myself having to back it up a lot because I missed his words due to hard to pay attention.. But if you can get past that and the little interludes they have in there from the CD recording format, its a good book. The first 20 min are especially nauseating, but after that its good info if you can stomach the reading. 2 times through is about all I needed to get the info nailed down.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Biren
  • Biren
  • 16-01-2015

worth listening

Namaste ji
one should listen or read once the book.
it been a good general information and experience.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for bea tea
  • bea tea
  • 18-10-2015

good story, terrible narrator

Any additional comments?

overall content was very interesting, but i found it VERY very hard to listen to the guy reading the book. He sounds very arrogant and uninterested, like reading this book is a very difficult effort.

11 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for lorenzo rodriguez
  • lorenzo rodriguez
  • 07-02-2015

Life-changing book

I have been practicing what I learned from this book and it is amazing. This has been by far the best book on body language that I have came across. It was a little slow during the first chapter, but trust me it does get better. I highly recommend this book to everyone.

11 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Pedro Magrin Tannus
  • Pedro Magrin Tannus
  • 25-04-2019

Clarifyingly joyful!

I "read" the book within 24 hours of acquiring it. Dinamic, science driven and oriented to inform. Definitely using as foundation for my practice. I wish there were more in depth examples and situations.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Robert
  • Robert
  • 01-12-2015

Insightful

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

There are a few friends that i think would find this interesting but i think the majority would find it tedious. I'd recommend it to anyone interested in body language.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

Well I definitely wasn't surprised by the ending. It’s not like it turned out the author was lying the whole way through. Like all non-fiction books the endings are usually quite obvious.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narrators voice started to grate on me after a while and i needed to take frequent breaks. His voice did make it difficult to listen to.

Could you see The Power of Body Language being made into a movie or a TV series? Who would the stars be?

No

Any additional comments?

Overall the content was very interesting and insightful. I have noticed i have started actively observing people a lot more and trying to spot the meanings behind their movements. It’s also interesting to spot my own pacifying behaviour and note when and why i am doing it. I enjoyed the author’s anecdotal explanations of his work with the FBI which helped to add credibility to what he is conveying. The only thing that let the audiobook down was the author’s narration. I understand why he has decided to narrate his own book but sadly his voice was not engaging and i found him very difficult to listen to. The content of the book however outweighed the narration so on the whole i enjoyed this audiobook.

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Mr J Phan
  • Mr J Phan
  • 03-09-2016

Powerfull, Thoughtfull and eye opening

Would you listen to The Power of Body Language again? Why?

Yes, there is to much in this book that can be easily forgotten.

His book is insightful, old movies like Ocean eleven would have you believe you can tell if someone is lying if the person looks up left or right. What you take from his book is you can't tell what they are thinking precisely, you can tell how people feel or what mood they are in. Which can give you que's to ask follow up questions to know why they feel the way they do.

IT helped open my eye's and made me monitor myself not so I could decisive, but to practice mindfullness. I am able to now think about some of the que's and know what I am feeling with more accuracy which helped me work through my emotions rather than be ruled by them.

If you’ve listened to books by Joe Navarro before, how does this one compare?

I have not read other books

How did the narrator detract from the book?

He was very methodical, however his tempo or reading speed made it difficult to stay interested during the technical dissection of his examples.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No, there is to much to absorb in one go.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Nicolas
  • Nicolas
  • 28-05-2019

A fascinating insight into body language.

"The Power of Body Language" by Joe Navarro is a fantastic audio book! The first time I have managed to listen to an entire audio book, from start to finish, in just one sitting.

I found the content to be very educational, as well as a fascinating insight into the world of body language. I am a complete beginner with no prior experience or knowledge of the subject matter, just a keen interest. I found this audio book to be well paced & structured, with clear & professional audio.

The only two criticisms I have are as follows... 1) It's a little slow to start off with, just for the first 30 minuets or so... 2) The overall duration of the audio book is a bit short. I would have liked a few more hours to really explore some of the content in more detail.

Overall I had a really enjoyable & engaging experience. I would definitely recommend this audio book to anyone with an interest in body language.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for James Lewis
  • James Lewis
  • 30-04-2019

Get to the point!!!

spends first 60 minutes convincing you you NEED this book. Get to the Point!!!

He rambles too. I feel seriously condescended too. He has so far told me the same thing 11 different ways. I'm meant to be learning something START TEACHING!!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for MarkPT
  • MarkPT
  • 07-06-2017

Interesting stuff

Yeah, interesting topic and content, Joe seems a down to earth and reasonable fella, and thought the information was good if not life changing!

Just a very weird and non relevant advert at the end of the book?!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Sensei Biker Dad
  • Sensei Biker Dad
  • 18-05-2017

Recommended

Easy to listen to. Extensive content. I will introduce some of the visual clues that I have learned from this book into my Self-Protection teaching.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for S. Gupta
  • S. Gupta
  • 12-12-2016

Good starter

Interesting to provoke imagination and get the first taste of body language. Doesn't get into a lot of depth.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Gman
  • Gman
  • 15-09-2016

Great book

Great insight into human behaviour, well worth the money. The narrator definitely knows his field.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Marcio Borlenghi Fasano
  • Marcio Borlenghi Fasano
  • 12-01-2015

Superb!

I have enjoyed this Audio book from the beginning to the end. It gave me a very good insight of everything i needed to learn.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Andre
  • Andre
  • 18-01-2015

Informative and eat to listen too

Well structured and helped me see things that I sort of knew in my subconscious but it validates what I thought was happening.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful