Showing results by author "Scientific American" in All Categories

Categories

256 results
Sort by
    • Nanotech

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this special issue, Scientific American looks at nanotechnology. What is this science of "small" technology and manipulation at the tiniest scale? What promises does it hold for electronics, robotics, and more? How much of it is hype?

    Non-member price: $8.72

    • August 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Life Springs": Deep oceans were thought to hold life's origins. New evidence points instead to an active volcanic landscape. "Building a Better Harvest": Scientists are learning to manipulate the complex conversation that plants have with microbes, pests, nutrients, and other elements in hopes of averting a future famine. "Talking to Ourselves": Studies of the conversations people have with themselves open a window on the hidden working of the mind. "Requiem for the Vaquita": What the demise of a small Mexican porpoise tells us about extinction in the 21st century.

    Non-member price: $10.08

    • Creativity

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American Mind
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The cover story in this issue explains how creativity and brilliance arises in all of us. Then, we'll take a look at the latest theories behind the experience commonly known as 'deja-vu'. Also, we'll learn about a mental breakdown that causes apathy so extreme it could become deadly, as well as Capgras syndrome, a perception disorder that causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by extraterrestrial body doubles.

    Non-member price: $8.72

    • September 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 18 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths": The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny. "Is there a 'Female' Brain?": The debate over whether men and women have meaningfully different brains could have profound implications for health and personal identity. "When Sex and Gender Collide": Studies of transgender kids are revealing fascinating insights about gender in the brain. "Not Just for Men": Researchers must dig deeper into gender differences before they can provide better treatments.

    Non-member price: $10.18

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3
    • Performance
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 2

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Non-member price: $2.83

    • How to Build a Time Machine

    • Scientific American
    • By: Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 14 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    It goes without saying that building a time machine wouldn't be easy. But according to author Paul Davies, it might actually be possible.

    Non-member price: $2.86

    • Scientific American

    • Is Global Warming Harmful to Health?
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 24 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Computer models indicate that many diseases will surge as the earth's atmosphere heats up. Signs of the predicted troubles have begun to appear. Paul R. Epstein discusses why this prospect is deeply troubling, since infectious illness is a genie that can be very hard to put back into its bottle.

    Non-member price: $2.13

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    Non-member price: $2.13

    • July 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Memory's Intricate Web": A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories. "Black Holes from the Beginning of Time": A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter. "How Cities Could Save Us": Urban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful. "Operation: Diabetes": Surgery that shortens intestines gets rid of the illness, and new evidence shows the gut – not simply insulin – may be responsible.

    Non-member price: $10.08

    • Scientific American, April 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 27 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "A Rare Success against Alzheimer's": A gold-standard clinical trial provides evidence that diet, exercise and an active social life can help prevent cognitive decline. "How to Swallow a Sun": New techniques reveal how supermassive black holes shred entire stars. "Transformers": By reprogramming DNA inside harmful microbes, biologists are turning them into patient-saving drugs. "Evolution at the Limits": Studies of fishes that inhabit toxic sulfide springs reveal mechanisms of natural selection.

    Non-member price: $10.08

    • Scientific American, May 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "The New Origins of Technology": 3.3-million-year-old artifacts from Kenya upend the classic story of when and how humans became innovators. "Strange News from Another Star": Alien technology is probably not causing Boyajian's star to dim mysteriously. But alternative explanations are hard to come by. "Missing Links": Loss of some DNA during evolution may have helped create big brains and our male-female relationships. "Schizophrenia's Unyielding Mysteries": Gene studies were supposed to reveal the disorder's roots. That didn't happen. Now scientists are broadening the search.

    Non-member price: $10.08

    • Scientific American, June 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "The Quantum Multiverse": A surprising connection between cosmology and quantum mechanics could unveil the secrets of space and time. "The Messy Truth about Weight Loss": Two decades of research confirm that weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume—but what you eat is more important than how much you exercise.

    Non-member price: $10.18

    • Scientific American, February 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "The Exercise Paradox": Studies of how the human engine burns calories help to explain why physical activity does little to control weight. "Pop Goes the Universe": The latest astrophysical measurements, combined with theoretical problems, cast doubt on the long-cherished inflationary theory of the early cosmos and suggest we need new ideas. "High-Flying Microbes": Aerial drones and chaos theory help researchers explore the many ways that microorganisms spread havoc around the world. "Deep-Space Deal Breaker".

    Non-member price: $10.18

    • Scientific American, January 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 7 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Lab-Built Brains": Scientists copy nature's most complex organ in the hope of solving the mysteries of brain disorders, from autism to Alzheimer's. "Tangled Up in Spacetime": The collaborative project "It from Qubit" is investigating whether space and time sprang from the quantum entanglement of tiny bits of information. "Heart Therapy": Harnessing the organ's own healing properties may help prevent heart attacks and lessen the painful effects of severely narrowed coronary arteries.

    Non-member price: $10.08

    • March 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Near-Light-Speed Mission to Alpha Centauri": A billionaire-funded plan aims to send a probe to another star. "Cancer Killers": Some advanced cancers can now be successfully treated by synthetic immune cells that are more powerful and longer-lasting than any found in the body. "Brain Trust": Poverty may affect the size, shape and functioning of a young child's brain. Would a cash stipend to parents help prevent harm? "Am I Human?": Researchers need new ways to distinguish artificial intelligence from the natural kind.

    Non-member price: $10.18

    • Scientific American, June 2016

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Ascent of Mammals": Recent fossil discoveries reveal that evolution began laying the groundwork for their rise to world domination long before the dinosaur-killing asteroid cleared the playing field. "Stellar Fireworks": Every year thousands of exploding stars appear in a bizarre assortment of forms. Astronomers want to know what makes them go boom. "Preventing Tomorrow's Climate Wars": The U.S. military is taking steps to limit the chance that worsening droughts, rising sea and melting Arctic ice will hasten uprisings that threaten national interests.

    Non-member price: $10.08

    • Scientific American, May 2016

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 29 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Born of Chaos": New evidence suggests the solar system's early eras were defined by wandering worlds and staggering displays of interplanetary destruction. "The Maddening Sensation of Itch": How it arises is only now becoming clear. "Saving Eden": Conservationists are looking to ecotourism to preserve Myanmar's wilderness, but challenges abound. "Quantum Connections": Scientists are trying to make quantum computers a reality by connecting many small networks together into one large whole.

    Non-member price: $10.08

    • Scientific American, April 2016

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Tales of a Stone Age Neuroscientist": By honing ax-making skills while scanning their own brains, researchers are studying how cognition evolved. "The Neutron Enigma": Two precision experiments disagree on how long neutrons live before decaying. "The Cancer Defense": Enhancing the body's own immune system is leading to promising results in the battle against malignancy. "Machine Life": Synthetic biologists are close to putting living cells to work diagnosing human diseases and repairing environmental damage.

    Non-member price: $10.18

    • Scientific American, March 2016

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 31 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Mystery Human": An astonishing trove of fossils has scientists, and the media, in a tizzy over our origins. "The Puzzle of Dark Energy": Why is the expansion of the universe accelerating? After two decades of study, the answer is as mysterious as ever, but the questions have become clearer. "Brain Drain": An internal plumbing system rids the brain of toxic wastes. Sleep is when this cleanup ritual occurs. "Syria's Climate Refugees": Farmers who have escaped the embattled nation explain how drought and government abuse have driven social violence.

    Non-member price: $10.18

    • Scientific American, February 2016

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 41 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "The Search for Planet X": In the far reaches of the solar system, a hidden planet larger than Earth may be lurking. "Bitter Taste Bodyguards": Bitter taste receptors are not only on the tongue but throughout the body, where they defend us against microbial invaders. "The Quantum Hack": Quantum computers will render today's cryptographic methods obsolete. What happens then? "Six Billion in Africa": Population projections for the continent are alarming. The solution: empower women.

    Non-member price: $10.18

Show titles per page
  • 1
  • 2
  • ...
  • 13