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Publisher's Summary

Once dismissed as a mathematical curiosity, black holes are so strange they almost defy belief. Since their existence was confirmed, research into the nature of black holes has opened up new vistas in physics. In this audiobook, we examine some of the most fascinating discoveries about black hole formation and behavior, the new and evolving research in gravitational wave astronomy, theoretical possibilities such as wormholes, and much more.

©2020 Scientific American, a division of Springer Nature America, Inc. Scientific American is a registered trademark of Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved (P)2021 Blackstone Publishing

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  • CHET YARBROUGH
  • 07-08-2021

E=mc2

“Black Holes” is a brief compilation of 21st century “Scientific American” articles narrated in Audiobooks by Alex Boyles. At the least, these articles stimulate interest in finding out more about the history of black holes. When were they discovered? Why is their discovery important? Why do they seem to contradict the experimentally proven theory of Quantum Mechanics? Why should we care?

Could all black holes in a universe act as though they are connected at a distance? Maybe energy and mass equivalence is not lost but spookily transmitted to other black holes. Einstein may yet be confirmed. Maybe there is a missed fundamental law of physics that offers a Newtonian order to the universe.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 16-09-2021

A collection addressed to astronomers

If you are interested in other aspects of BH this is not the source. This book is a good summary of the state of the art from the standview of celestial observations, along with a few incursions in cosmology and astrophysics.

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