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The Great Impersonation

Narrated by: Peter Noble
Length: 8 hrs and 54 mins
5 out of 5 stars (4 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

East Africa, 1913. The disgraced English aristocrat Everard Dominey stumbles out of the bush and comes face to face with his lookalike, the German Baron von Ragastein. Months later, Dominey returns to London and resumes his glittering social life. But is it really Dominey who has come back - or a German secret agent seeking to infiltrate English high society? 

As international tension mounts and Europe moves closer to war, Dominey finds himself entangled in a story of suspicion and intrigue. He must try to evade his insane and murderous wife as well as escape the attentions of the passionate Princess Eiderstrom - and will eventually uncover the secret of the ghost that haunts his ancestral home.

©2014 The Oppenheim-John Downes Memorial Trust (P)2018 Soundings

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It's got it all!!!

Love, hate, forgiveness, spys, mystery, ghosts, ww1, dark Africa. It's all there. What else do you want?

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    5 out of 5 stars

A great book.

A Great book! I actually manage to finish it within a week! Will definitely recommend this.

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  • j
  • SYDNEY, Australia
  • 29-06-2018

Superb performance and presentation

Edwardian in tone and a little jingoistic the story is beautifully constructed and written in a flawless tone. It is only enhanced by Peter Nobles flawless performance. I cannot recommend it too highly. Listen and enjoy
Please let us have more of both writer and narrator

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  • John
  • 13-08-2019

A Thundering Good Yarn, Indeed

“Sir,” said Mrs. Bowles, “there’s a body in your sitting room.”
“A body?” I’m bound to say that this Phillips Oppenheim-like opening to the conversation gave me something of a shock.

For years, this mention in a P. G. Wodehouse short story was all I knew of E. Phillips Oppenheim. From the context, I assumed he was another of the myriad early 20th Century writers who, like Wodehouse, entertained a ravenous reading public. Now I know he made a very fine job of it.

Amazingly, this tangled tale of double identities, triple agents and divided loyalties was, like all of Oppenheim’s output, dictated to a stenographer—with no plot outline beforehand or revision afterward. Yet it is, in the words of one Audible UK review, “a thundering good yarn” built out of popular tropes of the time—gentlemanly duels, imperial adventurism, high life in country houses, official intrigues and unquiet spirits. There’s even a touch of vintage Golden Age humor here and there. And our reader Peter Noble perfectly conveys the characters and psychological complexities that make this story far more than the sum of its familiar parts. This is escapism of a high order.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • H. Tollyfield
  • 17-11-2018

Evokes the pre WW1 era very well

This is a very well written story of its time and it is excellently narrated by Peter Noble. We might look back on the piece through the lens of our own times and find things to criticise, but as a story written almost contemporaneously with the end of the Edwardian era and the early days of WW1, it evokes the society, its mores and concerns very well - and all as part of a thunderingly good yarn. It picks up the theme of one person taking on the life of another as a means of furthering and confounding the aims of governments in their preparations for war - a theme used by other authors of the time, such as Anthony Hope and John Buchan - and carries it through very successfully, with a very satisfying, if well-signalled twist. All in all a very enjoyable listen.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Christopher Leach
  • 13-07-2018

excellent

we'll written and well read
a taste of the last month's before the first war
written with insight and intrigue before the world began to slide down hill

2 of 2 people found this review helpful