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Publisher's Summary

In the wake of the pandemic, will we see a new politics of social security and concern for the future? 

Between the fires and the plague, Scott Morrison had no choice but to adapt his style of leadership. But does he have an exit strategy for Australia from the pandemic? 

In this original essay, George Megalogenis explores the new politics of care and fear. He shows how our economic officials learnt the lessons of past recessions and applied them to new circumstances. But where to from here? Megalogenis analyses the shifting dynamics of the federation and the appeal of closed borders. He discusses the fate of higher education - what happened to the clever country? And he asks: what should government be responsible for in the 21st century, and does the Morrison government have the imagination for the job? 

'Morrison has no political interest in talking about the future. But passivity does not reduce the threat of another outbreak. In any case, the future is making demands on Australia in other ways.'

George Megalogenis has 35 years of experience in the media, including more than a decade in the federal parliamentary press gallery. His book The Australian Moment won the 2013 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Non-fiction and the 2012 Walkley Book Award and formed the basis for the ABC documentary series Making Australia Great

©2021 George Megalogenis (P)2021 Audible, Ltd

What listeners say about Quarterly Essay 82: Exit Strategy

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Been a while since I’ve read such sober, information analysis in Australian politics

I learned quite a bit from this very nice, compact summary. Eloquently draws threads through all the prime ministerial eras of Australia to the 60s. Thoughtful, timely.

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Great picture of pandemic and current politics

Essential listening for Australian politics in the midst of the pandemic. Historical and researched perspective.

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Great Insight and History

Very informative. George explains a complex lay of the land in a very clear, concise and understandable way. Highly recommended!

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Compelling and Salient

A must read to understand the political landscape of Australia post pandemic. Megalogenis is spot on in his analysis and his prognostications will more than likely prove prescient.

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Excellent Analysis of Aussie Politics GFC beyond

Excellent Analysis of Aussie Politics GFC to Pandemic and beyond with a bit of a reflection on Howard to Menzies

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Best Quarterly review ever!

Quarray vs brain economy. Sydneysiders in Canberra ignoring Victorians. Passive PM only caring about next election. Excellent! Lots of prrtinant insights! God save Australia!

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Leftist ABC Journalist hit on Australia’s Prime Minister

Opinion piece not worth the effort required to click download. Recommended reading for radical left keeping negative narrative in hope that ALP will win next election.


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Mandatory reading for every Australian voter

This qtrly essay by George Megalogenis is absolutely worth a listen. Full of direct quotes and background information, it is informative, enlightening and very, very interesting. Imho it should be mandatory reading (or listening) for every Australian prior to the next federal election. If voters could absorb this wealth of pertinent information they may give up some of their rusted on political allegiances, of any persuasion, or their gullible belief in spin and actually look deeper. Perhaps demand more transparency and accountability from our politicians than a flash headline, sound bite or facebook announcement? Maybe even vote according to what is best for Australia and all our futures. Thankyou George.

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Nothing on housing, immigration or inequality

This was a really intersting history of economic policy over the last 30 years or so but not as much as I would have liked on the actual way out of the pandemic which was what it was supposed to be about. I see young people with fewer opportunities than I had to get work that pays enough to afford housing or a family. Increasing inequality and social division are making my country less than it was. Apparently all we have to go with is a PM who bends like a candle in the wind and seems bent on increasing both the inequality and the social division. I woud have liked that to have been further discussed.

In the spirit of reconciliation, Audible Australia acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples today.