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History's Great Military Blunders and the Lessons They Teach Lecture

History's Great Military Blunders and the Lessons They Teach

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Publisher's Summary

Military history often highlights successes and suggests a sense of inevitability about victory, but there is so much that can be gleaned from considering failures. Study these crucibles of history to gain a better understanding of why a civilization took - or didn't take - a particular path. Full of dramatic reversals of fortune and colorful characters, this course examines some of the world's most notable examples of military misfortune, from the humiliating destruction of a Roman army at Carrhae in 53 BC to the tragic landings at Gallipoli in World War I. Success and failure, as you'll learn, are two sides of the same coin.

These 24 lectures reveal how the trajectory of history hangs in the balance of individual battles; even a single person's actions in a particular moment have made drastic and irreversible impacts. From ancient Greece through global war during the first half of the 20th century, you'll delve into infamous conflicts such as the Charge of the Light Brigade and the Battle of Little Bighorn as well as lesser-known battles.

How could an army equipped with cannon be wiped out by Zulu warriors wielding spears and outdated firearms? How could armored French knights be vulnerable to the crude weapons of a band of Flemish shopkeepers? Why would a savvy Chinese general fall victim to a tactic he had previously used himself? Unpredictable twists of fate abound, demonstrating that when it comes to war, there are no givens. Sheer numbers, superior weaponry, and skilled leadership are never a guarantee of success.

Take a fascinating journey through some of the most gloriously inglorious wartime encounters. Along the way, you'll get to know some of the most legendary characters in world history.

©2015 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2015 The Great Courses

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.7 (6 )
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Performance


There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

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  • Michael
    EASLEY, SC, United States
    26/10/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Awesome as Aldrete's usual !!!"

    After listening to "Decisive battles" from the same author, I knew I had to listen to this title as well.

    If you want to learn college-level history, With the ease of just curling up with a good book that is beautifully narrated this is the course for you.

    18 of 20 people found this review helpful
  • Cliff Robison
    26/01/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "this IS a Great Course, REALLY!!"
    What does Professor Gregory S. Aldrete, PhD bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Passion, he brings these battles to life for the listener.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No, it's too long...but I did anyway.


    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Charles Grayson
    Memphis, TN USA
    11/07/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Hindsight Bias?"

    The professor does an outstanding presentation of his material.

    I have to wonder, though, whether many of these blunders are hindsight bias. For example, we only distinguish rashness from boldness when the endeavor succeeds or fails; there may be no way to determine which description applies beforehand.

    Many of the behaviors that the professor describes also precede great successes as well as failures, and it's only when failure occurs that they look stupid. The problem is that we don't keep data on stupidity followed by success, which makes it look artificially easy to determine when you're screwing up.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • J_T
    5/03/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Legitimate 5 stars"

    I am a big fan of The Great Courses. That being said, not all are worthy of 5 star reviews... unless they feature Professor Aldrete.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • CC
    Houston, TX, United States
    14/04/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great Stories"

    This course is comprised of 23 great historical stories and one final lecture sort of tying the stories together. Very easy to listen to and stay engaged.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Sam Fredericks
    22/02/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Very Interesting"
    What made the experience of listening to History's Great Military Blunders and the Lessons They Teach the most enjoyable?

    The premise for these lectures is just great. You listen to how these commanders and others invovled make error after error resulting in a horrible defeat of their forces. Spanning time from ancient Egypt to WW2 there are a ton of interesting stories here.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The various accounts are presented with a ton of insight into the people involved, the time, the customs, etc.


    What about Professor Gregory S. Aldrete, PhD’s performance did you like?

    Dr. Aldrete is a great lecturer and often includes a comic touch when presenting these tales. I had listened to his history of the ancient world course as well and highly recommend it if you are interested in standard history.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I blew through these vary fast and some are quite comical.


    Any additional comments?

    Very entertaining.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Billy
    24/12/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great book"

    Great book,informative I loved it. Our public schools should be ashamed for missing the opportunity do teach real history

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Charles
    24/12/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent course giving strong lessons in war"
    What made the experience of listening to History's Great Military Blunders and the Lessons They Teach the most enjoyable?

    Professor Aldrete is a wonderful lecturer and his storytelling abilities. He brought you in to each time period as a spectator to the generals and officers, and in some cases politicians. I think in particular the fact he mentioned specific quotations from them really brought their personalities into play.


    What did you like best about this story?

    Misnomer of a question since it was 24 individual stories. Though I enjoyed the human element, how you can see how overconfidence, miscommunication and arrogance over the enemy would come into play again and again in these battles.


    Which character – as performed by Professor Gregory S. Aldrete, PhD – was your favorite?

    Since the 'book' is actually a series of lectures. I will choose the Battle of the Crater. Professor Aldrete does a great job using this as his opening lecture as this hook would keep any student eagerly returning to lecture after lecture.

    I find the Battle of the Crater most mesmerizing since as an American I had never heard of it. He gives amazing insight into the officers motivations and follies and in doing so gave me a new thought about the history of the United States.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No, I listened to this book during drives and each of the lessons were an individual story that showed the frailties of command.


    Any additional comments?

    The great courses lecturers were an excellent addition to audible.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Cynthia
    Monrovia, California, United States
    16/08/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Martial Chaos"

    I'm a military history buff and a US Army veteran, so I really couldn't have asked for a more apt "The Great Courses" lecture series. It's thing to read a translation of Sun Tzu's "The Art of War" (approximately 5th century BCE), an aspirational guide to tactical warfare that's travelled the millennia well. It's quite anther to fearlessly examine some of the most painful military debacles in history and take meaning from what's written in blood . "History's Great Military Blunders and the Lessons They Teach" (Gregory S. Aldrete, PhD) is a neat survey course of things that have gone militarily very, very, wrong for more than two millennia.

    The lectures range from The Battles of Syracuse (415-414 BC) to World War II's Operation Market Garden (1944). Some are obvious, often repeated errors. Napoleon's 1812 winter invasion of Russia was about as successful as Charles XII of Sweden's 1707 invasion of the same country. The 1854 storied, tragic Charge of the Light Brigade is about attacking the wrong target. Some of the disasters of World War II were almost too painful to listen to. I remember hearing war stories first-hand from veterans in my grandparents' small town, and to know that sometimes their sacrifices were wasted hurts.

    I like that the lectures aren't Eurocentric - one of the best is on the 2nd Century Red Cliffs Campaign of the brilliant but merciless Chinese General Cao Cao. Even the strongest of tyrants don't always prevail. I got a kick out of the lecture on 1879 Isandlwana: 25,000 Zulus, Undetected. It was horrifying to Victorian England, especially the post-battle mutilation (actually, a sign of respect: the Zulu Warriors were releasing the spirits of the slain soldiers), but a century and a half later, it's a study in absolute arrogance and the triumph of what must have been derided then as "savages."

    I would definitely listen to another one of Professor Aldrete's courses.

    [If this review helped, please press YES. Thanks!]

    11 of 15 people found this review helpful
  • Alex Jordan
    12/08/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great material, Shatner-esque delivery"

    This is fascinating material! However, while the narrator clearly has mastered the material, his delivery is... full of... awkward... pauses, strange pronunciations, and odd turns of phrase. He's clearly reading the material, which would be fine if the delivery was not so distracting!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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  • John W
    UK
    30/11/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting content with a truly awful narration."
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    A more fluid narration! The guy who reads this audiobook is very clearly reading the content from a script. His speech stops and starts and emphasises in all the wrong places. Its like listening to William Shatner struggling with a script !

    If the book was read by somebody who could speak in a steady and confident manner it would fare much better, but sadly the narrator of this version sounds robotic, unusual, stuttering and impossible to listen to with any amount of concentration.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of History's Great Military Blunders and the Lessons They Teach?

    I'm not sure. Because I was so put off by the narrator's manner of speaking I stopped listening after a few chapters. The chapter about the battle of the Crater was quite interesting i guess.


    Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Professor Gregory S. Aldrete, PhD?

    Stephen Fry? Patrick Stewart? Quite frankly anyone who can hold together a deep, wise, and unwavering tone.


    You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    The content itself was relatively interesting - its just a shame it was presented in such a mispronounced, stuttering, odd and disjointed fashion.


    Any additional comments?

    Dont buy it unless you can put up with slow reading and mispronunciation.

    6 of 8 people found this review helpful

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