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The Meursault Investigation Audiobook

The Meursault Investigation

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Publisher's Summary

He was the brother of "the Arab" killed by the infamous Meursault, the antihero of Camus' classic novel. Seventy years after that event, Harun, who has lived since childhood in the shadow of his sibling's memory, refuses to let him remain anonymous: He gives his brother a story and a name - Musa - and describes the events that led to Musa's casual murder on a dazzlingly sunny beach. In a bar in Oran, night after night, he ruminates on his solitude, on his broken heart, on his anger with men desperate for a god, and on his disarray when faced with a country that has so disappointed him. A stranger among his own people, he wants to be granted, finally, the right to die.

The Stranger is of course central to Daoud's story, in which he both endorses and criticizes one of the most famous novels in the world. A worthy complement to its great predecessor, The Meursault Investigation is not only a profound meditation on Arab identity and the disastrous effects of colonialism in Algeria but also a stunning work of literature in its own right, told in a unique and affecting voice.

©2013 Editions Barzakh, Alger. 2014 Actes Sud. Translation 2015 Other Press. (P)2015 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"A tour-de-force reimagining of Camus’s The Stranger, from the point of view of the mute Arab victims." (The New Yorker)

"Fajer Al-Kaisi's performance of this fascinating and disturbing book is crisp and beautifully articulated.... This audio production makes a striking novel of ideas a rich and human experience." (AudioFile)

What Members Say

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  • CHET YARBROUGH
    LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States
    15/06/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "AN ALGERIAN LIFE"

    Kamel Daoud resurrects Camus’s main character from the book, “The Stranger”, by recounting the imagined life of an Algerian killed by Merusault. Nothing is absolutely known about Merusault’s victim. Camus suggests Merusault believes the victim is one of two people who assaulted himself and a friend on an Algerian beach. Merusault is sentenced and executed for murder but less for being guilty than of not caring for his dying mother, not believing in God, and living life without purpose.

    Harun, Daoud's main character, and Merusault are the same; i.e. both are nihilists (neither believing there is meaning in life); both have little regard for their mothers, both live lives that demand nothing, give nothing, and mean nothing. Both are immoral. Neither believes in God or religion. Life is trivialized in both Daoud’s and Camus’s stories; i.e. Daoud represents an Arab perspective, and Camus a French perspective; similar outlooks, different ethnic backgrounds, but the same point of view. The devastating conclusion infers Algeria is as doomed by independence as by colonization.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Archetype
    Plantsville, CT
    10/01/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "excellent retelling / re-envisioning"
    Any additional comments?

    The Stranger is the classic of existential lit. Daoud's novel is the parallel, antithetical, yet reduplicated story of the unnamed 'Arab' whom the anti-hero of Camus' novel kills. But, be warned - If you haven't read The Stranger recently and haven't had to read it critically, then The Meursault Investigation will fall short. The brilliance of this novel is the layering that creates at first a contrast between Camus' Meursault and Daoud's narrator Harun, who tells the story of his dead brother Musa - 'the Arab' shot in Camus's novel -- but ultimately shows they are two sides of a single coin.

    Absence of a god versus the killing of god/religion; the death of an unnamed local by a privileged colonial vs the death of a colonial after the end of the war for independence; the failure of that war and independence to live up to the expectations of those who wanted better and how the victors destroyed their own world in that reach for freedom; and trials not for killing someone but for their failures of character -- these are some of the complex comparisons and contrasts Daoud explores as his narrator tells his tale in bar over a series of nights.

    We are eavesdroppers on an intimate conversation 70 years after the death of Musa. We only hear one side, but the interviewer carries his copy of The Stranger (here presented as a factual account written by Meursault) and we can glean what it is he asks periodically. Harun is witty, and contemplative, but angry and obsessed, his entire life revolved around the incident of his brother's death and the book written about it. He is a hard man, and ultimately unsympathetic. There were moments where I wondered if his brother had been in fact the 'Arab' at all - that instead he became the substitute for the brother that disappeared and gave him a target for his righteous indignation at the colonists and the religious.

    This is the type of novel that provokes thought, and argument, but leaves no solution, ties up no threads, fills in no blanks. It is the type of novel that inspires critical papers and if I were still teaching high schoolers, I'd pair these two novels because, in the end, they enhance each other while simultaneously making us question both.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Kaui
    Bay Area, CA
    28/06/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An enthralling double feature!"
    Any additional comments?

    In The Meursault Investigation, the "stranger" is fully developed, at once resented, loved and mourned. The tone is searing (v. Stranger's detachment); the language equally sparse. This book has been hailed as a loving tribute to Camus' masterpiece. It has also been recommended as a mandatory accompaniment to The Stranger. I agree with both conclusions. I strongly recommend (re-) reading The Stranger then immediately delving into The Meursault Investigation. You will be enthralled.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Micah
    9/06/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Good but.."

    Its a was good book I enjoyed the strong lanuage from the speaker but the main character bored me mid way through

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tom Galbraith
    21/02/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Meursault Should Have Shot Kamel Daoud"
    Would you try another book from Kamel Daoud and John Cullen - translator and/or Fajer Al-Kaisi?

    Never for Daoud, Cullen was only the translator.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Kamel Daoud and John Cullen - translator again?

    No


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    Yes, it is slow.


    What character would you cut from The Meursault Investigation?

    The narrator


    Any additional comments?

    The book is exploitive, a dirty trick on Camus fans. Its narrator is a fictional brother of Meursalt's unnamed Native Algerian murder victim in The Stranger. He spews out a seemingly endless disorganized railing against the unfairness of it all--Camus becoming famous while denying the narrator's brother an identity by not mentioning his name, a microcosm of the whole nasty colonial experience, and the bother was a swell guy to boot, helped support the family, treated the younger brother narrator to peppermint ice cream. (I made up the ice cream, but it was something like that.) Details I do not remember because I I have tried very heard to forget everything in this book. I already knew that the French treated Algerians wretchedly. I've seen The Battle of Algiers; know that Camus was broadly criticized for his failure to condemn French actions in it. Repeated invective and expressions of self-pity however well deserved soon become tedious. They become unbearably so ten minutes into this audiobook. By a considerable margin The Meursault Investigation is the worst audiobook I've ever listened to.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Timothy McDonnell
    New York, NY United States
    12/09/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great idea, except the author can't write"
    What disappointed you about The Meursault Investigation?

    This sounded like a brilliant idea. The story of the Stranger from the point of view of the Arab family of the murder victim. That kernel of an idea is the last bit of creativity you'll find in this "novel". No character development. No plot. Just a tedious adolescent monologue by the narrator. Even as short as it is, if felt unendurably long.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Kamel Daoud and John Cullen - translator again?

    Nope.


    Which character – as performed by Fajer Al-Kaisi – was your favorite?

    There are no real characters in this book.


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Meursault Investigation?

    I would have bought the idea, and turned it over to a writer - Orhan Pamuk, perhaps - to turn into an actual novel.


    Any additional comments?

    Don't waste your precious time.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
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  • Graeme
    Leigh-on-Sea, United Kingdom
    22/07/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "'Publishing Sensation of the Summer'"
    Any additional comments?

    If you are familiar with The Cure's song 'Killing An Arab', you will know that it is based on the incident in Albert Camus' 'The Outsider' in which the central character, Mersault, shoots and kills an Arab on an Algerian beach.This book, 'The Meursault Investigation', which has won several awards in France, takes the form of a first-person narration by the dead man's brother (who we find out was called Musa - he remains nameless in 'The Outsider'), putting across his version of events.This is a good idea, and well executed. I thoroughly recommend it - though it makes little sense unless you've already read 'The Outsider'.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • jesjaspers
    Suffolk, UK
    15/09/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "phenomenal."

    a must read for anyone who is reading or who has read Albert Camus's The Stranger. a postcolonial mirror / companion piece giving voice to Camus' unknown Arab victim through his brother and providing great insights into Algerian politics and psyche pre and post independence. A fascinating read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • brendan421
    23/01/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "disappointment"

    I read the original etranger, spurred on by this book. That simply highlighted the flawed assumptions and poor writing of this do called "sequel". tedious

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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