Get Your Free Audiobook

Non-member price: $33.43

After 30 days, Audible is $16.45/mo. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

Calorie information is ubiquitous. On packaged food, restaurant menus and online recipes, we see authoritative numbers that tell us the calorie count of what we're about to consume. And we treat these numbers as gospel; counting, cutting, intermittently consuming and, if you believe some 'experts' out there, magically making them disappear. We all know, and governments advise, that losing weight is just a matter of burning more calories than we consume.

Here's the thing, however, that most people have no idea about. All of the calorie counts that you see everywhere today, are wrong.

In Why Calories Don't Count, Dr Giles Yeo, obesity researcher at Cambridge University, challenges the conventional model and demonstrates that all calories are not created equal. He addresses why popular diets succeed, at least in the short term, and why they ultimately fail, and what your environment has to do with your bodyweight.

Once you understand that calories don't count, you can begin to make different decisions about how you choose to eat, learning what you really need to be counting instead. Practical, science-based and full of illuminating anecdotes, this is the most entertaining dietary advice you'll ever come across.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2021 Dr Giles Yeo (P)2021 Orion Publishing Group

What listeners say about Why Calories Don't Count

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 06-07-2021

Nicki

Interesting book! Liked it towards the final 4 chapters The 2nd and 3rd chapter had way too much science stories about calories and science jargon that I had to skip. Protein fat and carbs bit was the best parts.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Dog lover
  • Dog lover
  • 28-06-2021

Very interesting

The book is quite scientific in parts and can be pretty hard going but i found it very interesting. Dr Giles Yeo is funny and witty and the information is delivered in a non preachy informative way. I was hooked and will listen to it again

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Rory
  • Rory
  • 25-06-2021

Interesting

I love Giles; and this is an interesting book, but there is way too much science for me. A lot of it was way over my head and the first 3 chapters made me want to give up.
But it does get better; and Giles brings it to life by reading it himself.
He knows a lot about his subject and tries to make it interesting, but in the end the message was that although not all calories are equal it's still a case of eating less calories in order to lose weight.
It may help people to understand the process more.
Also, interestingly, he talks about a new drug for weight loss, that my doctor spoke to me about the next day. It sort of mimics the gastric bypass and changes hormones so you are not hungry. Maybe it's the way forward for people who are genetically pulled towards eating more and are not able to say no to some things.

In the spirit of reconciliation, Audible Australia acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples today.