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Publisher's Summary

There are libraries of books on theodicy - the branch of philosophy and theology that wrestles with how God can allow a world to exist within which there is suffering and pain. The problem with these libraries is that they contain books that are generally written by professionals for their peers. Where the Hell Is God? combines the best of the professional s insights with the author's own experience and insights to speculate on how believers can make sense of their Christian faith when experiencing tragedy and suffering.

Starting with a very personal story of the author's sister being left a quadriplegic from a car accident 20 years ago, Where the Hell Is God? gently leads the listener through some take-home messages that are sane, sound, and practical. Among these messages are: God does not directly send pain, suffering, and disease. God does not punish us; God does not send accidents to teach us things, though we can learn from them; and God does not will earthquakes, floods, droughts, or other natural disasters.

This concise, accessible, and experience-based book will help people who are suffering as well as those who minister to them and their families.

©2010 Paulist Press (P)2011 Paulist Press

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  • Thomas F Mulligan Jr
  • 24-09-2021

A Must

Very insightful book and well narrated by the author. I have already gifted this book I enjoyed it so much. Richard Leonard SJ is a gift.

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  • Kindle Customer
  • 31-07-2019

One of my favorites

I love this book. Fr. Leonard's discussion of suffering is honest, real and profoundly moving. He dies sugar coat or run from the tough stuff but also presents a genuine idea of God as some always with us in our suffering from whom no evil could ever come

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  • Christian R. Unger
  • 30-11-2017

Great insights and food for thought

Probably not the best part, but I loved the Australian attitude of religious and general discussion coming through.
Very well structured, thorough but focussed, truly insightful and not 'preachy'.

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  • Paul Snatchko
  • 11-02-2017

Great to Chew Over

If you listen to this work for only one reason, it is for Fr. Richard's explanation of why he never sings the third verse of "How Great Thou Art."

In the spirit of reconciliation, Audible Australia acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples today.