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Way of the Warrior: The Philosophy of Law Enforcement (Superbia)

Narrated by: James Patrick Cronin
Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
3 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

Non-member price: $27.79

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Publisher's Summary

The true blue line is not thin

Now mandatory in Police academies, FTO programs, and universities! The number one law enforcement philosophy series.

Written by full-time Police Detective and author Bernard Schaffer, whose new hardback novel The Thief of All Light will be available from Kensington Publications in bookstores everywhere.

Whether you're a hard luck grunt working the street or a white shirt administrator who'd need a GPS to find it, Way of the Warrior is for you.

Equal parts biography and instructional guide, Way of the Warrior focuses on the core of the individual officer: the warrior spirit. It discusses how to successfully uphold the law and not lose your mind in the process.

Contains information on:

  • What it means to protect and serve
  • Training and equipment
  • The eight golden rules of criminal investigation
  • The unsolvable problem of police work
  • Police suicide
  • The culture of law enforcement organizations
  • And much more!

This is a must listen for anyone in law enforcement but will also delight fans of thrillers, mysteries, and true crime.

©2013 Bernard Schaffer (P)2017 Blunder Woman Productions

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Genuinely disappointed

As an LEO I’m fascinated by other stories and experiences of other officers. It started well but rather quickly turns into a rather aggressive tirade of what the author thinks we should all see the world...well America anyway. Maybe I’m not the target audience, as I’m not American, but I felt as though the author was shoving his rather strong views down my throat. I admit I didn’t get further than about quarter of the way through before I just lost interest in how the rest of the World was inferior and dangerous to the American way of life.

I was really hoping for a deeper look into how a fellow Police Officer manages the stresses of the job, and maybe the book got back on track, but I certainly didn’t buy it to hear someone tell me why I should always carry a gun and that I should be ready to shoot anybody at any time. I have no doubt that many people will enjoy his anecdotes and slightly one-eyed view of historical events but even then I feel he’ll be preaching to the converted.

The title is misleading, it’s not about the philosophy of Law Enforcement. The way of the warrior is probably more apt. It’s a shame the author raised some really interesting points about Policing but not nearly balanced enough...I really wish it could’ve been as I would’ve been genuinely interested in a book about LE philosophy. Maybe write a sequel and just leave out the overt cynicism?

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  • Larissa Carnevale
  • 07-11-2018

not at all what I expected

The author is a 20year LE veteran, but his advise is, keep your head down on patrol and get off the streets as soon as possible. He goes on to tell you he was very pro strict gun laws and never carried a gun off duty until way late in his career. It wasnt until his research to prove gun laws work, that he discovered they dont work and started carrying off duty. The info he gives from his research into mass shooting's is the only worth while info given. He gives some interrogation points. but they are pretty basic. He then talks about many other topics and gives super Liberal views in which he did little to no factual research. He just regurgitates false rhetoric given by CNN. I hope at some point he will actually research those topics, so just like his previous views on gun laws, his views can be corrected.
I found this authors LE experience with racism vastly different then mine. Maybe I have just always worked for good departments or maybe he just spent his whole career behind a desk watch the news, instead of being a street cop. I spent ten years in the Marine Corps before becoming a LE Officer. I worked multiple years in patrol in a large metropolitan area. I have been a Sniper on the Swat team for several years. On top of many other things I found annoyingly wrong with this book, is the fact that this Officer spent almost his entire carrier as a detective, but still had the audacity to name his book "The Way of the Warrior." His career and experience was far from a way of a warrior.

14 of 15 people found this review helpful

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  • AudioBook Reviewer
  • 27-11-2017

🏆🎧 ABR Reviewer's Choice Award Winner

The book The Way of the Warrior: The Philosophy of Law Enforcement by Bernard Schaffer is a teaching biography. It’s an articulate no-nonsense account of one’s journey into the police fraternity and advice on what that can and in Schaffer’s opinion should mean. I want to make clear I have no personal ties to law enforcement, the military, or any profession that might have ever used a gun. However, I have a deep appreciation for an honest story, well told and this is definitely one of those. While James Patrick Cronin was an excellent choice to voice this book, I immediately thought of The Way of the Warrior as the combination of 1) excellent and expert instruction from the bestseller What Every BODY Is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent’s Guide to Speed-Reading People. I also heard in The Way of the Warrior, 2) the often brutally honest storytelling and vivid descriptions from The Bitter Taste of Dying: A Memoir by Jason Smith, a man working very hard to get away from the law. Expert knowledge and excellent story.

Schaffer doesn’t waste time reminiscing about his childhood but includes enough backstory to give us perspective. With over twenty years of experience and a father with another 30 years, the author is more than expert in what it is to be part of a police organization. If someone were to ask, “can someone explain what is happening with the police recently,” it’s Bernard Schaffer.

While some of the reviews and blurbs mark it as required reading for police training programs, this wisdom reaches much further and to a general audience. Whether someone is starting in any career, it’s important to keep out of politics and to focus on finding the mentors you need while enjoying becoming exceptional in a specialty. The “Warrior” title leads to an easy misconception that being a warrior is about fighting, but this book is about keeping the peace in oneself, in one’s department, and keeping one’s honor to the profession through pride in one’s craft.

The police dramas on television do the profession a disservice because they make it seem like each day is one filled with the excitement that keeps an officer prepared at all times. However, there is often tedium that might make an officer leave their bulletproof vest off their body. The routine might lead to forgoing regular practice for when a situation comes that makes clear the officer has not readied for it. Schaffer provides two excellent examples with the illogic of keeping one’s knife on the same side as the holster and another with actually trying to pull a trigger with bulky gloves. “Adapt. Improvise. Overcome,” he writes.

The book made me remember every instance I met a police officer, good and bad, but I want to share one. In a traffic class I was in for going through a stop sign at least a decade ago, I remember the instructor’s words vividly. “Do you know those people who go through red lights, cut you off without a blinker, and speed through school zones?” “Yes, we said” “Doesn’t that annoy you?” “Yes, absolutely.” “Well, you are those people.” Who knows, maybe Bernard Schaffer was that instructor? Few books get it right like this one did. It’s honest in the writing voice with a depth of know-how that makes it a definite must listen. Don’t be put off by the word “philosophy” in the title, it’s not Plato or Aristotle giving some difficult to understand lecture. It’s a really, really smart guy putting in plain English that sometimes people do dumb things and sometimes officers do as well, but here’s why all that happens. It’s street wisdom for the masses.

About the narrator:

James Patrick Cronin is a veteran narrator who has over 200 books on Audible alone. If I hadn’t known that he was narrating, I would have simply said, “wow, this cop’s got a really good voice, he should do voice work.” While I credit Cronin for his reading, he had a really well-written book to read from.

Audiobook was provided for review by the publisher.

Please find this complete review and many others at my review blog.

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9 of 11 people found this review helpful

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  • ken
  • 11-04-2019

Good book for sergeants and line officers

So I read this book because I was going back to patrol after several years as a detective. This book helped me put my head back in the game. I highly recommend everyone, especially supervisors, to read this book. It definitely helped me to understand my troops.


Remember, regardless of how much experience you have as a cop, it’s always great to refresh yourself with the basics. Bravo Zulu to the author.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Son of Odin
  • 24-07-2018

A must read for all law enforcement

With having 20 years of law enforcement experience, I have read and listened to many books regarding mindset, training, case law, etc. This book too it to a new level. I found that I'm already doing most of the things Schaffer speaks of in his book. I was happy to see that in most things we agree. Where he lost me was in his last chapter... however, I respect his choice and decisions. I'm not going to go into what the last chapter is about, so you'll just have to spend a credit and find out for yourself. I think this should be a must read for all new officers.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Martin
  • 22-02-2018

Some good stuff, but supports BLM & Atheism

Well, just finished Way of the Warrior, a Philosophy of Law Enforcement. For my L.E.O. friends, I can't recommend it. It does have some good stuff in it, but 2 chapters completely turned me off. He is a supporter of BLM. Now, if he doesn't support those pushing the agenda he fails to say so. He out right says he believes in BLM and if you don't as a police officer, you are wrong. Additionally, if you believe in God (regardless of religion) you cannot be a good, effective investigator. No if, ands, or buts. Here is where he professes there is no God and he is an Atheist. (Of course, he waits for the final charter to say so). That is fine on a personal level, believe how you want. However I am 100% positive there are and have been investigators more successful at the job and with better skills than the author who have strong religious conviction.

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

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  • paul
  • 14-01-2018

Eye opening!

A very insightful and blunt look into the mindset of the modern day police officer. As a leo a lot of it comes as obvious, however I did learn a few things I had never thought of before. The last couple chapters had some very hypocritical, ignorant, or maybe just ill informed view points that I don't agree with. To speak about facts and then disregard well known facts about certain highly publicized officer involved killings was nauseating. I still highly recommend it even with those short comings.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • CJG
  • 09-05-2019

Very nice. Many good & important points throughout

Although the organization could have been much better, I agreed with over 90% of what the writer had to say. I enjoyed many of his smaller, personal stories, and there were several times throughout the book when he was able to tie therm together. The ending was a little off-beat, and I felt there was some content which could have been left out. I don't know if he was trying to make a point or not, but overall the book was very informative and entertaining. I would not see a problem with adding a book report based on this writing to any police academy curriculum; nothing mandatory, and they could take their time over the course of the academy to read the book then maybe turn in a short essay prior to graduation.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 01-04-2019

Not bad...a little self righteous for my taste.

He has strong beliefs and I respect that. I agree with everything he says...but I can't help but feel like the only reason he uses the admission of his flaws is to make you ignore his holier-than-thou view. Get past that, and I think everyone should listen to this, even if just for an understanding of police.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 07-03-2019

couldn't put it down!!

This book was a go to for me when I needed a pick me up. Very well written

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Brett
  • 13-02-2019

outstanding

an absolute must for police officers, it should be mandated for any civilian administrator to understand

1 of 1 people found this review helpful