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VHS Lives!

A Schlockumentary
Length: 2 hrs and 21 mins
4.0 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

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Publisher's Summary

The VHS era was like none other in the history of cinema. This new format rose quickly in the early 70s when there was a blockbuster on every street corner, only to die off with the advent of the DVD in the early 2000s. But VHS is rising from the ashes like a phoenix, being relived and retooled by the most dedicated and rabid fanbase of its kind. VHS Lives! goes deep into the psyche of VHS collectors, showing just why VHS is coming back into the public eye and why VHS is the hottest cult collector craze since the full beard and the boom in vinyl record sales. You may think you're hip, but unless you own cult horror big-box video nasties, with the faint whiff of mold and the smell of old video stores, you are very wrong! 

Directed and produced by Tony Newton, producer of 60 Seconds to Die.

©2018 Alchemy Werks, LLC (P)2018 Alchemy Werks, LLC

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Good for nostalgia - audio from a documentary film

Very nostalgic documentary of people going through their memories of VHS - artwork, movies, film making, video stores etc. Literally is the audio of a documentary film, people are interviewed about difference aspects of the VHS era. The film version of this would have the names of who these people are on the screen, but here there is no indication (some are obvious such as Lloyd Kaufman and Phil Anselmo). There are also references to things that would be better on film, especially when they are talking about their favourite VHS artwork (e.g. "look at this one" comments). Still, overall it is an entertaining listen, brings back a lot of memories from that time and it is great to hear what some key people have to say on the matter.