Get Your Free Audiobook

Uneasy Peace

The Great Crime Decline, the Renewal of City Life, and the Next War on Violence
Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
5.0 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

Non-member price: $30.74

After 30 days, Audible is $16.45/mo. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

Beginning in the mid-1990s, American cities experienced an astonishing drop in violent crime. By 2014, the United States was safer than it had been in 60 years.

Sociologist Patrick Sharkey gathered data from across the country to understand why this happened, and how it changed the nature of urban inequality. He shows that the decline of violence is one of the most important public health breakthroughs of the past several decades, that it has made schools safer places to learn and increased the chances of poor children rising into the middle class. Yet there have been costs, in the abuses and high incarceration rates generated by aggressive policing.

Sharkey puts forth an entirely new approach to confronting violence and urban poverty. At a time when inequality, complacency, and conflict all threaten a new rise in violent crime, and the old methods of policing are unacceptable, the ideas in this book are indispensable.

©2018 Patrick Sharkey (P)2018 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

What listeners say about Uneasy Peace

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 0 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 0 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 17-10-2020

well thought-out book!

Loved it. Very impressed with the logic, story and data-driven discussion. I learned tons. I highly recommend this book.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for J. J. Ames, Jr.
  • J. J. Ames, Jr.
  • 06-10-2020

A Guy Can Dream... Can’t He.

That’s really what this book should be titled. I completely agreed with everything discussed by Sharkey...right up to the point where he suggested that we rely on the near-death Warren Buffett, Rand Paul and Grover Norquist, to resolve all of the evils of urban violence and inequality. Tackling the problem of urban inequality most assuredly requires the aid and active partnership of committed, capable, able and powerful people, institutions, and absolutely governmental and non-governmental entities. However, at least a few of the individuals...must have either a soul, some sense of good character, and a modicum of credibility...preferably all of the above. Grover Norquist CREATED and continues to foster much of the problem. Rand Paul is such a tool that his next-door neighbor was forced to pummel him into unconsciousness...not even mentioning Rand Paul’s REGULAR blocking of federal aid going to 9-11 first-responders...and Mr. Buffett... Sure, he signed the pledge to give away the bulk of his net worth...AFTER having spent an entire career as a corporate raider, bailing out Goldman Sachs AT AN ENORMOUS PROFIT, and doing almost exactly what Mitt Romney was vilified for in 2012. Oh, yeah...and long after he made sure to pass enough wealth to his children, so that exactly the kind of inequality Sharkey bemoans, will forever exist in the Buffett Clan. So...while I am in total agreement with the premise, I think I would like Mr. Sharkey to stop collating his data in an R Script for just a moment and pass the pipe my way... I like to dream, too. Great work. Excellent book. Note to librarians everywhere...Code this one as “Fantasy”.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Graham Scharf
  • Graham Scharf
  • 17-09-2020

Defund the police? Read this.

For anyone concerned by mass incarceration, the role of police, and persistent inequalities, this is an excellent introduction to the issues. It is framed historically to understand how we got where we are, why, and what has worked (and not) in addressing urban violence in the past 50 years. Sharkey does an admirable job of showing how it is in everyone’s interest to make wise, durable investments in historically disadvantaged communities- and which investments are most promising. His proposals are not simplistic, and will disappoint those who want pithy slogans. But they are clear. And he makes a powerful case that there are strong reasons for people of every political and religious persuasion to act together. The only major disappointment of the audiobook is the narration. The narrator would do well as a ten o’clock news reporter. His inflection is appropriate for that genre. But this is a carefully reasoned argument that deserves a scholarly voice. Sharkey doesn’t need a dramatic narrator. His writing is sharp and clear and deserves a voice to match it.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Kris
  • Kris
  • 04-06-2018

Great, If you're interested in the topic...

Conclusion of the book: The next 'war' of the USA should be a war on violence... Using other methods than violence. Some of the non-brutal methods that has been developed are presented and discussed in this book. Not an abundance though, and mostly methods focusing on mobilizing communities through representatives and community leaders (what is a community leader wasn't quite discussed as I remember). The whole thing is about The States of course. I'm safe and sound in Scandinavia, where we don't have to worry about guns and extreme poverty... Sometimes throughout the book I was missing a bit of a global perspective. The issue of race crime is treated in this book too, but it's tempered with data and not the words of an ideological activist with no backup for his statements (even though the author does mix in some pathos stuff to create a narrative in presenting the research). It would be great if Audible puts up the author's other book where concrete suggestions for how to change policies towards nonviolent community making to increase public health are proposed. He presents it towards the end, but we don't hear much about it. All in all enjoyed this book though! More on this topic, please.