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Publisher's Summary

Brought to you by Penguin.

In the years just before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall, conservative politicians and intellectuals across Europe and America celebrated a great achievement, felt a common purpose and, very often, forged personal friendships. The euphoria quickly evaporated, the common purpose and centre ground gradually disappeared and eventually - as this audiobook compellingly relates - the relationships soured too.

Anne Applebaum traces a familiar history in an unfamiliar way, looking at the trajectories of individuals caught up in the public events of the last three decades. When politics become polarised, which side do you back? If you are a journalist, an intellectual, a civic leader, how do you deal with the re-emergence of authoritarian or nationalist ideas in your country? When your leaders appropriate history, or peddle conspiracies, or eviscerate the media and the judiciary, do you go along with it?

Twilight of Democracy is a new kind of political writing, an essay that mixes the personal and the political and brings a fresh understanding to the dynamics of public life in Europe and America, both now and in the past.

©2020 Anne Applebaum (P)2020 Penguin Audio

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Thought provoking

The author is an excellent narrator of her own work. Very well written, the book makes for much thought and discussion

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interesting, but sensible essay on the alt right

An interesting listen for anyone worried (or just curious) about the current state of politics and extreme polarisation. Also for anyone interested in UK, American and European politics, as she covers all three with fairly equally. As an Aussie with ties to all three regions I appreciated the scope of the book and the fact that it wasn't just about the USA. The author is on the right (centre right) which she makes no secret of but as someone who considers themself on the left (although maybe centre left after listening to this) I did not find this book partisan or overly ideological. It is heavily critical of the current Republican Party (though quite pro-Regan) and fairly critical of the Toris (though again quite pro-Thatcher, which I am not). The best part and most interesting aspect of the book was the way the author interwove the political and the personal and used her own experiences as a touchstone for her more esoteric arguments. I thought that this made less "dry" than other similar books. Narrated by the author who does a good job.

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unparalleled

An amazing intersection of contemporary political analysis, history, and personal relationships. Perfect book for our global moment.

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Author has a huge blind spot

The author provides a reasonable analysis of some of the causes for the rise of authoritarianism. However, the substantial gap in her analysis arises from her failure to make any attempt to explore her own political views (Reagan right) and how their implementation might have been a significant contributor to the current circumstances.

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Very shallow

A name dropping analysis of what is going on in the free world. A lot of name dropping and the author can't make up her mind whether she is American. Jewish, polish, European or what. A rich princess writing from a privelaged position. This book is not worth it.

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Wow what an insight

He who uses the latest technology of the day will create the politics of tomorrow.

Scary!

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Thoughtful dissection

This a very thoughtful, methodical and brilliant dissertation on democracy. A highly important read right now.

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  • John Pope
  • 29-08-2020

Brief but poignant warning about the forces of illiberalism.

Anne Applebaum’s insightful analysis of the dark forces around the world advocating extremism and authoritarianism is both revealing and chilling.

The coherent narrative Anne describes is a testament to her - and her husband’s - inside knowledge of the key players pulling the strings, and her desire to sound a necessary alarm. This is certainly a “in-case-of-emergency-break-glass” narrative during a critical moment of political, social and economic upheaval.

If you are worried about the nature and growing discord of contemporary politics, then this book is a must read/listen. If you’re apathetic about the future of democracy, then you should stop everything and read this book with immediate urgency.

The fact that Ms Applebaum is the narrator of her own book adds to the credibility of the content. One of the most important books of our time; along with Timothy Snyder’s “On Tyranny” and “The Road to Unfreedom”.

The best thing about this book is the sense of optimism that Anne finishes with; and a belief that democracy is not dead yet, but requires a renaissance of engagement and civic effort to save it from itself. All is not lost, as long as we’re prepared to do the heavy lifting that’s required to improve what we have today.

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  • Ragne
  • 19-08-2020

Important and thought provoking

Well, that was depressing... For instance, considering the spread of misinformation during the Covid-crisis, we can exclude the hopeful scenario she mentioned near the end of the book.

We have a very different political view, but I still think she mostly manages to be neutral. Though sometimes she shows a lack of understanding, for instance: The left does not oppose the European free trade agreement simply because it's a successful Thatcher implementation. There are so many reasons to dislike it, who implemented it is not one of them.

But its an important book, which I hope many will read. It shows that we need to be vigilant to keep our democracy, and that it's already time to fight for it.

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  • papapownall
  • 27-07-2020

The solemn atmosphere of forced patriotism

Economist journalist and historian Anne Applebaum has written a very personal account chronicling of her experiences of the rise of popularism and the impact it is having on the Western world. The book begins at a new years party in Poland at the dawn of the 21st century and charts the changes in the political viewpoints of some of the attendees over the next two decades in which we see the impact of a pre-disposition to authoritarianism which leads to people admiring demagogues and the erosion of democracy. As a previous colleague of Boris Johnson at the Spectator we hear first hand from Applebaum her analysis of how he, and Trump, have used "restorative nostalgia" to fuel nationalism to force through their personal agenda eg Brexit, and wall with Mexico. Applebaum considers how a nation is defined and how leaders use a "moral equivalent" argument to justify that meritocracy is the same of democracy and this encourages further authoritarianism.

There is, of course, nothing new with this tactic and we hear how, in 1890s France, the Dreyfus treason trial was used as a scapegoat for the failings of the state. Applebaum brings her analysis up to date with the 2020 Coronavirus pandemic that has lead to increased powers for the state that certain world leaders will find it hard to relinquish.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Jay Carroll
  • 24-07-2020

Insightful and necessary

Applebaum threads the needle connecting a surge of anti-democratic forces around the globe, and helps explain their success. She also reminds us that in many ways, history is repeating itself. Required reading.

2 people found this helpful

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  • D. Burgess
  • 13-10-2020

History Distilled to Save Our Time

Few people have the historical understanding, East and West, to distill events and shine a light on the changes that we should really be worrying about, the changes that can end life as we know it. Essential reading for anyone who cares about where we, humanity, is headed.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Allan Paterson
  • 30-09-2020

A must read for Politics today

This is an excellent explainer of why we have the (dreadful and corrupt) politics of today. Beautifully written.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Red
  • 27-09-2020

Essential listen in uncertain times

An essential listen in uncertain times. Anne Applebaum's journey and observations gives us an impelling overview of decades of liberal gaines and losses. Great story and well read. A must read!

1 person found this helpful

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  • MICHAEL W.
  • 08-08-2020

Clear, heart-felt and incisive observations

A great book - a personal, well-written, up-close analysis of the shift to populism and the extreme right (throughout Europe and beyond). Well observed and full of interesting details that highlight political and personal transformations of formerly optimistic and politically balanced individuals. How many more will mirror these transformations in future, both in Europe and beyond? From rational progressives & centrists to the illiberal extremes (both left and right) - and what will that society will look like, it's a worrying question that will linger long after reading this book.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Neill's on Wheels
  • 07-08-2020

essential reading

I could have listened to more, but for a short book, it packs a lot in. if you want to make some sense of the political landscape across many western democracies playing out before us with the rise of nationalism, then this is one perspective that I suggest will help.

1 person found this helpful

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  • richard
  • 28-04-2021

Not convincing

The author declares herself to be politically right leaning but everything she says is typical of the view of someone who is left leaning albeit not a fanatical ideologue.

She is an example of someone who has gained most from the advantages of globalisation and at no cost. This is the main problem with her observations. She blames the break up of western politics on populism and ideas she associates with right wing politics without asking why those views have arisen.

Furthermore almost every criticism she proscribes in respect of ‘the right’ I think could be equally applied to ‘the left’.

The author is obviously immersed in the political world both socially and professionally and perhaps that is why she does not see the wood for the trees.

Unfortunately to me the author is an example of the type of self satisfied and superior person that has driven centre rightists with whom she says she identifies further to the right becoming the very people she now so denigrates.

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