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Trade Wars Are Class Wars

How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens International Peace
Narrated by: Bob Souer
Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
Categories: Money & Finance, Economics
4.7 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

A provocative look at how today's trade conflicts are caused by governments promoting the interests of elites at the expense of workers.

Trade disputes are usually understood as conflicts between countries with competing national interests, but as Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis show in this book, they are often the unexpected result of domestic political choices to serve the interests of the rich at the expense of workers and ordinary retirees.

Klein and Pettis trace the origins of today's trade wars to decisions made by politicians and business leaders in China, Europe, and the United States over the past 30 years. Across the world, the rich have prospered while workers can no longer afford to buy what they produce, have lost their jobs, or have been forced into higher levels of debt.

In this thought-provoking challenge to mainstream views, the authors provide a cohesive narrative that shows how the class wars of rising inequality are a threat to the global economy and international peace-and what we can do about it.

©2020 Matthew C. Klein and Michael Pettis (P)2020 Tantor

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  • dugmartssch
  • 22-05-2020

Narrator is robotic

I think I'll buy this book as a hardcopy and give it another shot but Siri reads text with more intonation and emphasis . Completely impossible to listen to, I don't think a human read this. Listened to another book narrated by Bob Souer and this 1000% was not read by him. Don't do this audible it's terrible.

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  • David B.
  • 16-10-2020

Speaking of class...

Well-written, well-narrated. this book really made me think about inequality in our society today, and in particular about how I can't believe Jeff Bezos made so much money while Amazon workers contracted COVID-19 due to unsafe workplace policies with minimal hazard pay and were fired (and in some cases smeared and ruined) for organizing for dignified working conditions.

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  • Andy G.
  • 09-08-2020

sounds like it was narrated by machine

I'm currently at the end of 3rd chapter and can say 2 things: 1. It's extremely boring to listen. The lifeless, monotonic narration sounds like machine. I wonder if Audible does refunds for computer generated narration, because that one sure sounds like one. 2. 3 chapters and it's still historical exposition, that is pretty strangely structured: it went to 20th century once, then it went back to the 17th, while repeating similar narration. Sounds like filler. So far not much argumentation.

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  • Gerry Perez
  • 05-07-2020

Interesting prospective on global trade

Thought provoking book, with an excellent history of global trade imbalances and interesting speculation on their causes. Conclusions about how to correct current imbalances challenge every day solutions, and should promote some good policy discussions. Highly recommend reading this.

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  • Hugh Selwyn Mauberley
  • 20-09-2020

Robotic narrator never pauses

Just like the classes in surplus economies, not all sentences are equal; although in this audiobook the narrator reads them as if they were, without pausing between paragraphs or providing any vocal emphasis to guide the listener through complex arguments. The key sentences which set out the book’s thesis are read with the same intonation and at the same pace as all the others. This makes for an extremely tedious listen. For all I could tell, however, the book is an excellent and refreshing polemic on international trade, which has been highly praised by Martin Wolf and others. That said, there is a great deal of exposition which is merely asserted, and the book rambles through rather familiar history which did not seem particularly germane. Buy the book instead.