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Publisher's Summary

Peri, a wealthy Turkish housewife, is on her way to a dinner party at a seaside mansion in Istanbul when a beggar snatches her handbag. As she wrestles to get it back, a photograph falls to the ground - an old Polaroid of three young women and their university professor. A relic from a past - and a love - Peri had tried desperately to forget. The photograph takes Peri back to Oxford University, as an 18-year-old sent abroad for the first time and to her dazzling, rebellious professor and his life-changing course on God. It also takes her to her home with her two best friends, Shirin and Mona, and their arguments about Islam and femininity and, finally, to the scandal that tore them all apart.

©2017 Elif Shafak (P)2017 Penguin AudioBooks

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Awful fake ethnic accent ruined a good story.

Would you try another book written by Elif Shafak or narrated by Alix Dunmore?

Elif Shafak writes with such insight of Istanbul and the Turkish culture, but the story is tragically ruined by the infuriatingly distracting fake ethnic accent attempted by this narrator.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Zaheer
  • 05-03-2018

A story worth reading

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. Shafak weaves a story of 3 characters each dealing with the identity of being Muslim. All come from different background but dealing with the same problems. She shows in a remarkable way that being Muslim is not a homogenous idea. She exhibits superbly that people have multiple moving identities.

What other book might you compare Three Daughters of Eve to and why?

Mmm I don't think I have come across a book quite like it. It would be in the range of Paul Coelho meets Rumi.

Which character – as performed by Alix Dunmore – was your favorite?

Shirin. The Iranian Feminist.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

This book made me think. It made me wonder about things we don't say and things we do say. It helped me to realise that the idea of being Muslim can dominate a persons life like a wild fire taking over a forest. However, Muslim people too have lives that are relative and intersecting with many other demands.

Any additional comments?

You would do yourself a good favour by reading this book

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  • Ozlem Y Dessauer
  • 15-07-2017

Awfully Narrated!

What disappointed you about Three Daughters of Eve?

It is a good book though I can't stand the narrater who reads all the Turkish dialogs in Indian accent. Nothing wrong with indian accent but is extremely different than turkish accent. It was so bad, I have to stop listing the book.

If you’ve listened to books by Elif Shafak before, how does this one compare?

I just finished listing The Architect's Apprentice by Elif Shafak which was quite good and the narrater done a great job on that book.

What didn’t you like about Alix Dunmore’s performance?

She has no idea about the turkish accent, she was reading all the turkish dialogs (all of the characters) with indian accent which made it so confusing and awful that I can't stand listing.

What character would you cut from Three Daughters of Eve?

none of them, nothing wrong with the storyline nor the book.

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  • Pearl
  • 26-03-2017

very beautifully narrated.

Liked the book as I do with all books of Elif Shafaq. The beginning is wonderful! however lacks the depth and magic of forty rules of love or architects apprentice. Doesn't do much justice to exploring its theme of Muslim women and their dilemmas either. No closure.
and yet because I like the politics of Elif Shafaq I found the book engaging.

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  • Anthony
  • 08-02-2017

A spellbinding reading of a beautifully told story

In her 2010 TED talk, Shafak says, "I love writing in Turkish which to me is very poetic and emotional, and I love writing in English which to me is very mathematical and cerebral." Well, this English novel is certainly intelligent and reasonable, but it is also a most moving and poetic piece of prose.

Alix Dunmore's performance is spellbinding. Thank you both.

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  • AJ
  • 01-05-2017

Complex and intriguing

A serious novel with thought provoking themes. Excellent listening and well narrated. I will now buy the book!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • AMH
  • 03-06-2017

Simply wonderful.

Loved the structure, moving from the present to various points in protagonist's past. Full of tension, but also beautiful reflections on happiness, love, religious faith, learning. Beautifully narrated too!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Yogini
  • 29-10-2018

Fantastic Book

Loved the book listening to it on audible the narrators bought the story to life.
I enjoyed the characters and it feels as though you get know them personally.
Such a talented weaver of story is Elif Shafak bringing together so many topics that are much debated ....into tangible form.

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  • jenny
  • 22-07-2018

Great Story telling

Another great book from this author. Elif Shafak brings into this story so many of the relevant issues of today intertwining them between some interesting characters.
The jumps between the now and Perries childhood and then Oxford may not be to everyones taste.

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  • Soapsoane
  • 09-07-2018

Between Yes and No: How We Begin To Accept Ourselves And Each Other

This audio book is beautiful performance of a way of thinking and feeling about life and the way we move in it that includes everybody and every feeling. What’s beautiful is the way the history of a culture- its way of understanding how we cope with the impossible nature of being, is framed historically, autobiographically within a forbidding culture where, by rights, no one would exist, escape, survive or thrive because we are just not good enough for its precepts.
But we are, we do exist we do survive and thrive in spite of good and evil: maybe because of that foreboding culture that energises us to realise we can/do live and have the right to live but we must give up any notion that we are in control. Yet we can recognise that in the theatre of our performed lives there’s also the possibility of understanding, communication, humour and insight.

Great work Elif and Alix - a great team!

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  • O. M.
  • 25-06-2018

Intriguing and beautifully written

This book shows the portrait of a Turkish woman oscilating between traditional mysticism and western skepticism, an intriguing view on a paradoxal society. With well dosed tension the author plunges into cultural and reversed cultural shock making a point about religion and women at the same time. A wonderful listen.

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  • E
  • 22-06-2018

Enjoyable story

I very much enjoyed this book. It's easy to transport yourself inside the story and the detail written helps you to visualise the chapters as if you were a fly on the wall while it were all happening. My only complaint is how abruptly the story ended. I wanted more.

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  • G SADDIQUE
  • 21-04-2018

waste of money and time

I really did not enjoy this book at all, the performance and story were awful! I have read Elif Shafaq's 'forty rules of love' and loved the book but this book was such a disappointment, no real story and an awful ending. The performance was very disappointing too, such bad accents.

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  • Zainab Ali
  • 06-04-2018

Eye Opening

excellent story....good narration....very imaginative. this book made me question love, faith and friendship. good work Elif.

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  • K. Sewell
  • 17-03-2018

Mixed feelings

I am impressed with the writer's knowledge and style, but I was ambivalent about the plot. The characterization of Peri's parents was excellent as was the depiction of general dysfunctionality of families regardless of culture.
Too much energy went into arguing the existence or not of God, making me think that the writer was flaunting her intellectual prowess. Too little time went into clarifying why the main character betrayed her hero when she was otherwise portrayed as highly princlipled. Although everyone is allowed to be flawed, I think Peri ended up too flawed and for that reason I lost interest in her. The ending was very flat and unsatisfying.
The reader was faultless, good accents and did not intrude into the story.