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Thinking in Bets

Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts
Narrated by: Annie Duke
Length: 6 hrs and 50 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (45 ratings)
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Publisher's Summary

Poker champion turned business consultant Annie Duke teaches you how to get comfortable with uncertainty and make better decisions as a result. 

In Super Bowl XLIX, Seahawks coach Pete Carroll made one of the most controversial calls in football history: With 26 seconds remaining, and trailing by four at the Patriots' one-yard line, he called for a pass instead of a handing off to his star running back. The pass was intercepted, and the Seahawks lost. Critics called it the dumbest play in history. But was the call really that bad? Or did Carroll actually make a great move that was ruined by bad luck? 

Even the best decision doesn't yield the best outcome every time. There's always an element of luck that you can't control, and there is always information that is hidden from view. So the key to long-term success (and avoiding worrying yourself to death) is to think in bets: How sure am I? What are the possible ways things could turn out? What decision has the highest odds of success? Did I land in the unlucky 10 percent on the strategy that works 90 percent of the time? Or is my success attributable to dumb luck rather than great decision making? 

Annie Duke, a former World Series of Poker champion turned business consultant, draws on examples from business, sports, politics, and (of course) poker to share tools anyone can use to embrace uncertainty and make better decisions. For most people, it's difficult to say "I'm not sure" in a world that values and even rewards the appearance of certainty. But professional poker players are comfortable with the fact that great decisions don't always lead to great outcomes and bad decisions don't always lead to bad outcomes. 

By shifting your thinking from a need for certainty to a goal of accurately assessing what you know and what you don't, you'll be less vulnerable to reactive emotions, knee-jerk biases, and destructive habits in your decision making. You'll become more confident, calm, compassionate, and successful in the long run. 

Includes a bonus PDF of charts and graphs.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2018 Annie Duke (P)2018 Penguin Audio

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Very light content from disgraced pro

Very surface level understanding of the top. Great bluff, much like her Pro status. A more interesting book, and one she'd be very capable of writing, 'Fake it, until you make it' how I stole millions. Search Ultimate Bet and EPL.

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Great Thinking Book

I thought this book was fantastic! I've been grappling with some of the concepts in this book for some time but this really help me to solidify my thinking.

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  • Marcus Bircher
  • 09-02-2018

Great insights on improving decision making

Found out about this book via Michael Mauboussin discussing it on twitter - a highly credible source on decision making material - and the book did not disappoint.

'Think like a bettor. Think less about whether we are confident or not and more about how confident we are.'

Few key concepts that I think this book nailed:

Importance of accurate outcome analysis rather than 'resulting' and drawing too tight of a relationship between outcome quality and decision quality in a very uncertain world in which almost everything is a result of a combination of both luck and skill.

Biases she explains greatly - motivated reasoning, hindsight bias, self serving bias, internal conflicts of interest, knowing outcome when analyzing decision, temporal discounting + more.

Making decisions via explicit bets - thinking through wanna bet lens to better recognize there is always a level of uncertainty. Leads to tempering our statements as we stop to quantify the level of risk in our statements/beliefs which ultimately leads us closer to the truth.

Short term vs long term thinking - overestimating impact of momentary events on our happiness leads to irrational and emotional thinking which can degrade the quality of our bets and increase chance of bad outcome. Love the insight on the importance of this concept as she touches on temporal discounting, emotional decision making, and importance of accessing our past and future selves to put in the moment events in better perspective.

-Marcus



18 of 18 people found this review helpful

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  • Steven
  • 22-02-2018

Want to bet you will enjoy this book.

Would you listen to Thinking in Bets again? Why?

Yes, because I want to hear the many ideas and suggestions by Ms. Duke I missed the first time.

What did you like best about this story?

Ms. Duke takes complex areas of behavior science, decision making processes, and the pursuit of truth and couples those principles of sciences to the methods used by a professional poker player.

What about Annie Duke’s performance did you like?

Calm, upbeat, friendly narration.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I immediately locked into the theme of the book because of my experience as a professional and an amateur card player.

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

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  • Jennifer Kok
  • 19-02-2018

Love it!

I m so glad Annie Duke so decided to be the narrator. Love every bits of it. Now I do hope to have a workbook which I can step by step in ironing out my thinking flaws and patterns.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Michael
  • 30-03-2018

I bet I'll be quoting this book

This book is more of a good psychology lecture than a 'how-to' guide to decision making. Annie Duke went WAY deep into how decisions are made. I wasn't expecting such in-depth knowledge on the human thought process. This book should almost be required reading for anyone on social media or even just interacting with other people in general. It doesn't just cover how to make sound decisions, it also explains why people react the way they do to different situations. I really recommend this book if you're interested in human psychology and would like it laid out in a relatable way.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Philo
  • 04-03-2018

Very basic, wide survey, well composed and told

This is a walk-through of big ideas in decisions-under-uncertainty. It is low-math, but about as useful as one can get without equations. It is top-level as an absolute entry-level walk-through. It touches very shallowly on game theory, probability, and behavioral economics. It is composed almost across the board of others' ideas and quotes, but it is a nice plain-English synthesis. It is easy to acquire some sensible ideas here. Anyone who has been rooting through this stuff knows it all already, but I am enjoying it as a light refresher. The author narrates it. She has a fresh, youthful, non-professional voice, with no gravitas whatsoever. It was a bit distracting but I got used to it. I came to appreciate her sparkle and verve. I find myself enjoying myself, as I did with, say, Taleb's Fooled by Randomness. As with popular math books, it is easy for an author to promise a lot of easy understanding but to get plodding and dense and unlistenable in a hurry. This author did not fall into that trap. But those looking for serious analytical math-tools may aim for a more advanced level.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

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  • Julian Stahl
  • 25-02-2018

Great book!

Great analogies! Will be re-listening to this in the future. Money is a great motivation for assessing risk!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Nick Reese
  • 04-09-2018

Wasn't For Me

3 hours and it's nothing new if you're familiar with behavioral economics. For a more interesting listen I'd recommend Charles Duhigg's "Smarter Faster Better" which briefly touches on Annie Duke's story while driving home many of the key points of probabilistic thinking better.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • J. Veloso
  • 21-08-2018

The functional version of Thinking Fast And Slow

Easily digestible. Immediately applicable. Information was not sacrificed for brevity. Not too long like Kahneman’s book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Adam
  • 20-08-2018

AHHHG this book is so crazy good.

It's narrated by the author who knows what she's talking about, doesn't pull punches, backs up her positions and does it all concisely with excellent examples and detailed discussions about how to analyze potential decisions. It should be required reading for anyone who ever has to decide anything.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 09-08-2018

Would highly suggest for everyone!

this is a great book that has been on my TBR list for a while and I decided to listen to it instead. It was easy to follow, with very actionable advice and insight.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Kindle Customer
  • 16-04-2018

Actionable advice between some awkward padding

Thinking in Bets contains a multitude of actionable advice with which to make real changes to the ways we think about decisions and future planning. It makes very clear the benefits to be gained from acknowledging the way your mind works, through a comprehensive review of several concepts within the fields of behavioural psychology and decision economics. By simply taking the view of life as a game of poker, decisions can be made in more robust, rational, and healthy ways. Between the many useful pointers however there were a few areas where the same points were repeated or longer was spent on a particular topic than perhaps was necessary for concision. This detracted slightly from an otherwise very useful book. Recommended for those looking for useful ways to restructure the way we think about decisions

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 03-04-2018

Simply stated meaningful guidance

Whilst much of the advice in this book looks obvious with hindsight bias, the level of self knowledge needed to get the most out of this excellent book will tell you that it isn’t.

Thinking in bets is a great way to narrow the uncertainty window we know we can never elongate in a dynamic world.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Am Azon Custo Mer
  • 08-11-2018

Narrator is great. Book starts well ends boring

Narrator great, very clear
Book has interesting start
But an hour or two in already bored. Getting repetitive

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 13-09-2018

Take the Pressure off Being Right All the Time!

Great book, well read and expressed. A range of practical strategies to apply and develop with your truth seeking group! if you want to develop better decision making strategies this is a good book to help. May not be scientifically specific but I really liked the examples bringing the strategies to life.

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  • Roly H
  • 16-08-2018

Great

Great insight and topics really well covered with useful examples. Right balance of technical and practical.

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  • The Vikid Truth
  • 29-07-2018

Poker, Game Theory and Discipline

A good all-round read but a little longer than it needed to be in my opinion. The premises and conclusions are good, it will get you thinking for sure and I hope, help you make better decisions.

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  • ShopMyStyle
  • 24-04-2018

Great insight

loved it...going listen again and recommend...good for any strategy or people who want better outcomes

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  • Anonymous User
  • 07-04-2018

Excellent

Excellent book with a ground breaking thought process, already using it for my day trading.

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  • mr p
  • 02-04-2018

Surprisingly boring

I'm really unsure of the purpose of this book other than fulfilling the authors legacy of writing a book. It wouldn't be fair to say it lacks substance, because it did have substance that was often backed up by facts and research. But it did black something; if anything, it failed to be entertaining in the slightest.

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  • Chris Cox
  • 15-03-2018

Absolutely dire, avoid at all costs.

I downloaded Thinking in Bets expecting to listen to an interesting take on decision making in the personal and professional world from the perspective of a high stakes poker player. If you’re thinking the same let me save you seven hours and an Audible credit.

Uncertainty is a thing.
Sometimes things work out.
Sometimes things don’t work out.

Complete and utter bilge. Avoid at all costs.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful