Regular price: $34.75

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – love a book or swap it for free
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $16.45/month
OR
In Basket

Publisher's Summary

About 150 years ago, my great-great-grandfather, Robert Garner, carved the face of an old man with long hair and beard in the rock of a cliff on a hill where my family has lived for at least 400 years, and still does. He carved the face above a well that is much older. How much older, no one knows, but it's centuries older, or even more. And why did he carve it? He carved it to mark that here is the Wizard's Well.

I am Joseph's grandson, and I grew up on that hill, Alderley Edge in Cheshire, aware of its magic and accepting it. I didn't know that it wasn't the same for everyone. I didn't know that not all children played, by day and by night, the year long, on a wooded hill where heroes slept in the ground. Yet there were strange things. Below another ancient well, the Holy Well, a rock lies in a bog. It fell from the cliff above in 1740 and made the Garners' cottage shake. It landed on an old woman and her cow that, for some reason, were standing in the bog, and, as a result, are still there. When I was seven, the bog was dangerous for somebody of my size and I once got stuck in it and thought I was going to drown, even though I sank only to my hips; but I managed to reach the rock and to climb up it to where a fallen tree was lodged, which spanned the bog, and by sliding along the trunk I was able to reach firm land. Nearby, under the leaf mould, is a layer of white clay that we used as soap to wash ourselves before we went home after playing. But there wasn't anything I could do about my clothes, and Grandad was not pleased.

The Edge is a land of two worlds: above and below. It took me my childhood to learn about above; when I was 19, I went to learn the wonders of below: a world of darkness and silence, so dark that you can see the lights of brain cells discharging; so silent that blood in the veins can be heard.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©1960 Alan Garner (P)2005 Naxos Audiobooks

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

An Old One Revisited

I read this one when it was new (yep, I'm that old). It was fun to revisit, and I appreciate much of Garner's storytelling (before he became incomprehensible to me) but I found now, as then, that Colin and Susan are... bland. Not sure why. Philip Madoc has a great voice but I found his reading a bit stagy.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Graham
  • 21-05-2006

Highly recommended

I originally read and thoroughly enjoyed this book as a child, and was more than pleasantly surprised by this audio version. The narration is clear and engaging, and the story is fast-paced and enthusiastic, just as I remembered. The way in which Garner weaves folklore and a clear love of the local landscape, adds a sense of realism which increased the suspense and sheer enjoyment I felt on listening to this well-told tale. Highly recommended.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Hector Protector
  • 23-05-2009

One of the classics of children's fantasy

This is one of my favourite books of all time. Philip Madoc reads it beautifully and it translates very well from text to audio. I first read it to my daughter when she was 6 and she loved it. She listened to the audio version recently at the age of 31 - and loved it again! This is a book that is suitable for young readers as well as adults with a sense of magic.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • JermUK
  • 05-09-2017

As good as the first time

As good as it was when I read it for the first time, nearly fifty year's ago!!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • rgh
  • 12-07-2017

I've loved this book since I was a teenager

This book was my introduction to the creepy, atmospheric, exquisitely wrought world of Alan Garner and will always be my favorite. I was delighted to find it in audiobook form. The narrator did an extraordinary job and I know that I'll enjoy listening to it again and again in the coming years.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Michael
  • 09-05-2008

A fantastic book superbly narrated.

The Weirdstone has always been a favourite of mine, so finding it on Audible in unabrdiged form was a treat. I didn't expect too much from Philip Madoc as a narrator, but must say that his delivery and characterisation are superb. The characters come alive, and are are so distinct that the narration fades into the background and a vivid play is performed within ones imagination and Alderley Edge, the Svarts, Colin, Susan, Gowther, Bess, the Dwarves and Cadelin appear before you.

Throughout the childrens' adventures, you are there with them; in the bog, the caves, and other wonderfully presented dark, evil, scary places and you will find yourself right in the middle of the action with them, as they tackle their final desperate challenge.

I would recommend this book in written or audible form to anyone!

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • WJE Hoppitt
  • 30-07-2006

A absolute classic

I remember this book fondly from my youth, and the narration does the book justice. Strongly recommended to anyone with a taste for the Tolkein-esque! I just wish the BBC radio play was also available.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sara Black
  • 11-06-2017

No need for music

What did you like best about The Weirdstone of Brisingamen? What did you like least?

The Weirdstone is a brilliant story, which has been part of my life for many many years. I decided to get an audible version just to check how some of the names should be pronounced. Assuming Philip Madoc pronounced them the way Alan Garner intended, the audible book served its purpose. However, I am baffled by the decision to interrupt the flow of the story with prolonged, jarring music - there's no need for it between chapters and definitely not randomly within chapters. A very poor decision to force that on us and it nearly put me off listening to the whole book.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Konstantina
  • 08-04-2013

Very well narrated

I had this book on audio as a child and very much enjoyed re-listening to it after ten years. It's a good story, very exciting and full of adventure. The narrator is superb. Would recommend this to kids aged over about 8-9 and adults as well.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • S. Brearley
  • 16-03-2010

A childhood favourite re-visited

This book scared and thrilled me as a child and it's great to hear it read so well by Philip Madoc, who manages the accents very convincingly. Alan Garner has a deep knowledge of British myth and folklore and writes wonderful stories where 20th century life becomes entangled with the stuff of legend.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Hevpais
  • 28-04-2008

Recommended

Didn't read this book as a child, but enjoyed it. Worth getting just to hear Philip Madoc's wonderful voice narrating it, but a good buy in its own right.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • D. S. Jack
  • 04-09-2015

A gateway to fantasy

This is the book that eased me into the in depth world of fantasy.

Maybe not the best technically written book, but when the story is this immersive, are you worried?

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Suewhi
  • 23-12-2012

Brilliant

A wonderful story with some memorable characters the good guys Cadellin and Durathror and the baddies the Morrigan and Grimnir, living hidden from the inhabitants of Alderley Edge and unexpectedly stumbled on by two children Colin and Susan. I remember reading this when I was 11 and forty years later it is still full of wonder for me. A childrens book that even an adult can enjoy and sets your feet firmly on the path to discovering new worlds. A magical book with The Moon of Gomrath coming next.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Alexandra
  • 04-11-2010

philip madoc is marvellous, the book is good too!

This book is very enjoyable overall although the writing has weaknesses. The story has a gripping start, a slow middle, and a gripping concluding part, although the actual ending came so suddenly I felt cheated of a final chapter which would have brought everything to a more satisfying conclusion. Philip Madoc is a star reader, and I could not imagine anyone else bringing the story and characters to life as he did for me. He is just marvellous.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Antony
  • 22-04-2008

Excellent

Highly recommended, eery atmospheric music between the chapters adds a creepy charm, all the characters are well-performed, my favourites being the cautious Fenodyree the dwarf and the earthy tones Gowther Mossock. It's wonderful to hear them brought to life and I finally know how to pronounce Brisingamen!

4 of 5 people found this review helpful