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Publisher's Summary

C. Vann Woodward, who died in 1999 at the age of 91, was America's most eminent Southern historian, the winner of a Pulitzer Prize for Mary Chestnut's Civil War and a Bancroft Prize for The Origins of the New South. Now, to honor his long and truly distinguished career, Oxford is pleased to publish this special commemorative edition of Woodward's most influential work, The Strange Career of Jim Crow. The Strange Career of Jim Crow is one of the great works of Southern history. Indeed, the book actually helped shape that history. Published in 1955, a year after the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education ordered schools desegregated, Strange Career was cited so often to counter arguments for segregation that Martin Luther King, Jr. called it "the historical Bible of the civil rights movement." The book offers a clear and illuminating analysis of the history of Jim Crow laws, presenting evidence that segregation in the South dated only to the 1890s. Woodward convincingly shows that, even under slavery, the two races had not been divided as they were under the Jim Crow laws of the 1890s. In fact, during Reconstruction, there was considerable economic and political mixing of the races. The segregating of the races was a relative newcomer to the region. Hailed as one of the top 100 nonfiction works of the twentieth century, The Strange Career of Jim Crow has sold almost a million copies and remains, in the words of David Herbert Donald, "a landmark in the history of American race relations."

©2002 Oxford University Press Inc. Afterword © 2002 by William S. McFeely. (P)2014 Audible Inc.

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The Confederacy won the civil war

This and other more recent books that focus on the political atmosphere of the years past the end of the military phase of the civil war are very revealing. They show conclusively that the southern persistent persecution of individuals and groups that supported freed people eventually wore off the North's resolve to reform southern society. It is time this story is known by a wider audience.

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  • A. Jimenez
  • 06-08-2018

Great book

This book offers a fantastic outline of the history and tactics used to oppress black people. Some of the tactics are still used today, making this book a must read for those concerned with the current political landscape.

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  • Chillman36
  • 15-12-2016

Worthwhile history lesson

Well written book on the struggle to abolish segregation. Thoroughly enjoyed it and if your a history buff like myself you'll enjoy it also!

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  • Lisa
  • 07-11-2016

Very Informative.

Almost put it down. Glad I didn't - LOTS of information. An invaluable history lesson. A definite re-read.

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  • Alednam A Uonopk
  • 18-01-2021

Worth listening too.... added to the bibliography.

·Blacked Out Through Whitewash: Exposing the Quantum Deception/Rediscovering and Recovering Suppressed Melanated by Suzar

·Christopher Columbus & the Afrikan Holocaust: Slavery & the Rise of European Capitalism by John Henrik Clarke

·They came before Columbus: The African Presence In Ancient America by Ivan Van Sertima

·Stolen Legacy: The Egyptian Origins of Western Philosophy by George G M James

·How Europe Underdeveloped Africa by Walter Rodney

·The Delectable Negro: Human Consumption and Homoeroticism Within US Slave Culture by Vincent Woodard

·Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America by Cameron McWhirter

·Germany's black holocaust, 1890-1945 by Firpo W. Carr

·Superior: The Return of Race Science by Angela Saini

·The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein

·The Willie Lynch Letter and the Making of a Slave by Willie Lynch

·Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X Kendi

·White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg

·The Man-Not: Race, Class, Genre, and the Dilemmas of Black Manhood by Tommy Curry

·They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South by Stephanie Jones-Rogers

·The Destruction of Black Civilization : Great Issues of a Race from 4500 B.C. to 2000 A.D. by Chancellor Williams

·The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E. Baptist

·Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II by Douglas A. Blackmon

·The Accident of Color: A Story of Race in Reconstruction by Daniel Brook

·Wilmington's Lie: The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy by David Zucchino

·African Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean
By Herbert S. Klein, Ben Vinson III

·The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

·John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights by David S. Reynolds

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  • Stephen
  • 09-08-2018

Worst Narration Ever

The book itself provides a fascinating history of the South after Reconstruction and subsequent Jim Crow periods. The writing style and subject material are dense, which makes it hard to listen to- perhaps would be easier to read the book. What made this book difficult to get through was the awful narration. The narrator’s tone was irritating, smug and condescending and reminds you of the smartest person in the room.

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  • A. Brown
  • 28-11-2016

the truth is Stranger Than Fiction

infuriating but is true its history what can you do . narration was kind of monotone in beginning kind of made it hard to pay attention but seemed to improve a little as the story continued on

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  • Rick
  • 03-06-2016

We all must look to the past for answers

We all can benefit from reading this great work of history. MLK was right in calling it the "the historical Bible of the Civil Rights movement".

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  • Andrew
  • 04-04-2017

Essential Reading

If you want to understand the history of injustice in the US and civil rights, then you need to read this book. It's a seminal pathbreaking work. I am not going to claim that it is perfect by any means. Vann Woodward does not make that claim either. As one example, his discussion of the "radical black" political movement in the 1960s and 1970s sounds completely at odds with everything that precedes it. It makes no sense to condemn black political frustration and aggression right after documenting a century of calculated racial aggression from white society. The point is, this isn't the final word on the topic. But it's an impressive first attempt that everyone should read.

The narrator is clear. His style is a little odd. But I had no trouble understanding everything he read. It's not easy to read non-fiction. So I appreciate the performance.

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  • Casey W.
  • 04-03-2021

Must read in all high schools!

It is an uncomfortable history Americans must face. A hard look at racism in our current world.

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  • Brant
  • 13-10-2020

The races were not as separate as we think

This book is essential to understanding the fact that the races in the United States are not naturally opposed to one another, and indeed they once mixed freely. I heartily recommend this audio book.

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