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The Road to Ruin

The Global Elites' Secret Plan for the Next Financial Crisis
Narrated by: James Rickards
Length: 10 hrs and 47 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (94 ratings)

Non-member price: $34.34

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Publisher's Summary

Penguin presents the unabridged downloadable audiobook of The Road to Ruin, written and read by James Rickards.

The best-selling author of The Death of Money on how investors can prepare for the next financial panic - and why it's coming sooner than you think.

The global economy has made what seems like an incredible comeback after the financial crisis of 2008. Yet this comeback is artificial. Central banks have propped up markets by keeping interest rates low and the supply of money free-flowing. They won't bail us out again next time. And there will be a next time...soon.

In The Road to Ruin, best-selling author James Rickards identifies how governments around the world are secretly preparing an alternative strategy for the next big crisis: a lockdown. Instead of printing money to reliquify markets and prop up assets, governments are preparing to close banks, shut down exchanges and order powerful asset managers not to sell. They're putting provisions in place that will allow them to do so legally. What's more, the global elite has already started making their own preparations, including hoarding cash and hard assets.

When the next one comes, it will be the average investor who suffers most - unless he or she heeds Rickards' warning and prepares accordingly.

James Rickards is the best-selling author of Currency Wars and The Death of Money. He is a portfolio manager at West Shore Group and an adviser on international economics and financial threats to the Department of Defence and the US intelligence community. He served as facilitator of the first-ever financial war games conducted by the Pentagon.

©2016 James Rickards (P)2016 Penguin Random House UK

What members say

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  • 087
  • 04-04-2017

Worth a read/listen

Was good to get an different view and perspective of what caused the GFC and other financial crisis. Not sure whether I agree that a crisis cannot be forseen because there were people that predicted the crisis, and even tbough the author says there will be another crisis, how does he know for sure if he mentions on several occasions that the previous crisis could not have been predicted? Quite technical in places and did go off on a tangent several times that I did not think were relevant but overall a good book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Eye Opener

I enjoyed this book a lot more than expected. Some very well researched points that lead you to question what we currently take as given. The historical context gives us some great examples of the book's rationale. Well worth a listen.

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  • Mark
  • Sydney
  • 03-06-2017

Excellent and timely account of systemic risk

Very interesting and topical approach to the assessment of risk in a more complex and interconnected global financial system.

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Mandatory reading

I really enjoyed this book. It's nice to know how the polical and financial elite have and continue to manipulate the small end of town (you and me). There is a reason for major political change. it is long overdue. Brace yourselves for the crash of 2018-25

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Expert on the economy

Extremely knowledgable author that reinforces his views with history and science.
His views differ slightly from books by other authors I have read and I welcomed his view and history and science regarding the economy. I highly recommend this audiobook as an easy way to listen to a book that would take me a few days to read.
It's also great to hearing the voice of the author as you progress through the chapters.

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Eye opening

A fantastic insight into societal decline and how to protect ones family against it. chilling.

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  • ENI STEPHEN
  • 09-05-2018

An impressive masterclass in global finance

James Rickards boldly puts answers to various troubling macro economic questions in our time. The sustainability of the endless expansion fueled by money printing, leverage and its atendant moral hazard is put to the test perhaps better than most other writers in similar series. Highly recommended read if finance brings to you more questions than answers

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  • M. Russell
  • 05-01-2017

Almost (but not quite) beyond belief

If you could sum up The Road to Ruin in three words, what would they be?

Tomorrow's world Today

What other book might you compare The Road to Ruin to and why?

On the Beach - Neville Shute

What about James Rickards’s performance did you like?

Quietly lucid and easy to listen to

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Well researched and support insights on every page from someone deep inside the world of money and currency (you'll soon discover the difference) I constantly had to remind myself that Ian Fleming's James Bond could not have done a better job - main;t because that was fiction. If you want the history of the banking system it's here

Any additional comments?

Fascinating.

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  • Adrian J. Smith
  • 11-09-2017

The best Economics book of the past 5 years

This book stands on two strengths, readability and penetrating insight. Rickards utilizes his position as a capital markets insider and a quasi member of the elite to unveil both the instability of the current financial system, and the likely consequences.
The consequence he proffers is Ice-Nine, a fictional chemical dooms day device in Kurt Vonnegut's 1963 novel Cat's Cradle. This chemical reacts with water supplies to render everything solid at room temperature. Ice-Nine in Rickards words are asset freezes on a global scale as the only likely response to a further crisis, one for which the elite are I'll prepared.
If this sounds far fetched, one would do well to realize that this has already happened in recent years, in Greece and Cyprus, and has happened in similar forms in US History, such as FDR's Gold confiscations. The tools and back up for Ice-Nine is already in place, including the war on cash and the digitisation of money.
As a resident of China, I can speak of no better success story of war on cash than the near universality of WeChat Pay, and how cash is becoming increasingly shorter in supply. Rickards's notions are not far fetched if one observes carefully enough.
Rickards provides additional insight into the over leveraged nature of the financial system, and uses examples, particularly the 1998 collapse of Long Term Capital Management as a precursor to the crash of 2008, and how elites did not learn from 1998 and still haven't learned from 2008.
Rickards's book is both sobering and insightful. Much economic knowledge can be gained and built upon, however, it is an immensely entertaining and insightful work, narrated par excellence by the author himself.

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  • Rik Muschamp
  • 19-06-2017

Intriguing, scary, paranoid!

Any additional comments?

An interesting analysis of the history of the world financial market and the potential direction we are heading. Rickards comes across as a plausible commentator with a great deal of insight into the subject. However, the core concept of the book seems a little grandiose and paranoid to be realistic. I wholeheartedly believe much of it is possible but the end game seems unlikely.

Why would this mysterious global elite want to turn capitalism into socialism when capitalism is what made them rich in the first place?

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  • aragornsmum
  • 10-06-2019

Chilling

Great book, a great listen. Looking forward to the next installment coming from Jim Rickards

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 29-04-2019

Must read great technical knowledge

Amazing technical insight into world economics and worlds elite - recommended read - from an insider with outstanding intelligence & experience

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  • Raymond
  • 20-03-2019

I knew nothing about investing I do now

I know nothing about investing or financial markets but this book teaches more than that, it's about history, modelling and physics. it's given me a good understanding of the working of markets and what to invest in and that's all I care about

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  • slipperychimp
  • 28-10-2018

More like James Rickards fanciful autobiography

This book is extremely poor in terms of content - I grew very tired of all the stories along the lines of "then I had a meeting with the CEO of this bank" "then I presented to the board of xyz" "then I met so-and-so".

It's just a long biography of things the author may or may not have done though his career, name dropping at every opportunity and providing nothing in the way of real substance. Avoid.

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  • Vytautas Liesis
  • 08-03-2018

wow

one of the best non-fiction books ever that I have listened to. very recommendable. it gives a lot of perspective on our current financial and political situation in the world.

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  • Momoto
  • 03-01-2018

Too paranoid or not paranoid enough?

Well narrated, and pretty coherent. If you’re a adherent of the paranoid style in American politics then you won’t doubt any it is true. I found the ideas on complexity theory/historical analysis were really interesting, also the battle lines of state and private/corporate power. At the core is a simple idea - the world is too complex to try and model, don’t try, look to the past. Also the motivation of the global statist elite and the push for a cashless society was pretty compelling - though I don’t see how hyperinflation and negative interest rates go together. Only complaint was he goes off on some tangents - portfolio balance,

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  • Miro
  • 25-10-2017

Excellent

Very informative book, this is a real insider information, hopefully it doesn’t happen, but the chances are enormous. James Rickards has done a great job. Highly recommended to whom want to be prepared.

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  • Marc
  • 02-10-2017

Real eye opener.

Buckle up and hold tight.
Times are about to change. most people can't see it coming!