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The Lost World of the Flood

Mythology, Theology, and the Deluge Debate
Narrated by: Adam Verner
Length: 5 hrs and 25 mins
Categories: History, Ancient
4 out of 5 stars (1 rating)

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Publisher's Summary

"The flood continued forty days on the earth; and the waters increased, and bore up the ark, and it rose high above the earth . . . and the ark floated on the face of the waters." (Gen 6:17-18 NRSV) 

In our modern age the Genesis flood account has been probed and analyzed for answers to scientific, apologetic, and historical questions. It is a text that has called forth flood geology, fueled searches for remnants of the ark on Mount Ararat, and inspired a full-size replica of Noah's ark in a biblical theme park. Some claim that the very veracity of Scripture hinges on a particular reading of the flood narrative. But do we understand what we are reading? Longman and Walton urge us to hit the pause button and ask, what might the biblical author have been saying to his ancient audience? 

As with other books in the Lost World series, The Lost World of the Flood is an informative and enlightening journey toward a more responsible reading of a timeless biblical narrative.

©2018 Tremper Longman III and John H. Walton (P)2019 Tantor

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  • Otto
  • 24-04-2019

A defence of a hyperbolic interpretation of the flood

Makes a compelling case for the usage of hyperbole in the historical passages of the Bible. However, when applied to the Flood account, this is less than compelling.

For example, it is not well established that the original Israelite audience could have recognized the relevant details as an obvious hyperbole. And should we really think that people from the age of megalithic architecture were incapable of constructing large wooden structures, even to the degree that such descriptions would be seen as hyperbole? After all, it is not that easy to cut through and move monumental blocks of stone.

The book also covers most of the relevant fields of evidence, including biblical interpretation, mesopotamian flood narratives, archaeology, universal flood mythology as well as a scientific critique of Flood Geology.

I found the arguments weak or superficial on multiple points, especially the critique of alternative theories. The arguments against the local flood interpretation have a number of important points, but don't engage in a dialog with more sophisticated versions of the local flood account, so some options are abandoned on weak evidential grounds. A similar tendency can be seen when discussing global flood accounts.

However, this lack of depth seems to be a common problem with books on the topic, and in comparison The Lost World of the Flood is a fairly good introduction to the topic.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • Jeff
  • 15-06-2019

Great book, but probably wouldn't convert.

I liked the book, bought into it, but I don't believe it would have convert anyone who wasn't already part of the way there. Must read other Lost World books to fully grasp this one.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Bill Sharky
  • 03-05-2019

Like nails on a chalkboard

Expected a Sitchin type book. Got a lame dissertation of disinformation. Terrible. Want a refund

3 of 14 people found this review helpful