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Publisher's Summary

He's the worst Nazi war criminal you've never heard of

Sidekick to SS Chief Heinrich Himmler and supervisor of Nazi rocket scientist Wernher von Braun, General Hans Kammler was responsible for the construction of Hitler's slave labor sites and concentration camps. He personally altered the design of Auschwitz to increase crowding, ensuring that epidemic diseases would complement the work of the gas chambers. 

Why has the world forgotten this monster? Kammler was declared dead after the war. But the aide who testified to Kammler's supposed "suicide" never produced the general's dog tags or any other proof of death. 

Dean Reuter, Colm Lowery, and Keith Chester have spent decades on the trail of the elusive Kammler, uncovering documents unseen since the 1940s and visiting the purported site of Kammler's death, now in the Czech Republic. 

Their astonishing discovery: US government documents prove that Hans Kammler was in American custody for months after the war - well after his officially declared suicide. 

And what happened to him after that? Kammler was kept out of public view, never indicted or tried, but to what end? Did he cooperate with Nuremberg prosecutors investigating Nazi war crimes? Was he protected so the United States could benefit from his intimate knowledge of the Nazi rocket program and Germany's secret weapons? 

The Hidden Nazi is true history more harrowing - and shocking - than the most thrilling fiction. 

©2019 Dean Reuter, Dr. Colm Lowery, and Keith Chester (P)2019 Blackstone Publishing

What listeners say about The Hidden Nazi

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Not the best

The Author gives off the perception through his writing of being an over enthusiastic World War Two follower. His comments made throughout the book loose the readers trust in his work as an historical piece and make one feel as though he entered this project with some well entrenched views. Comments such as ‘wanting to get out of the interview alive’ when talking to an old man on his sick bed whose father was a NAZI criminal that the son barely knew.
Shows an unwelcome level of added emotion and drama in an historical text.

Stating that the son saying that his father visited him seemed out of place as ‘a father lives with a family and does not simply visit them’ again adds an unneeded perspective from the author. My father was in the military and when deployed for a year he ‘visited’ the family twice.

I having read a number of historical books and I had a hard time with this one. I didn’t find it to be overly enjoyable as the trust in the Author was lost at the beginning. Although this style may be suited to some and I encourage people to try it first as it does provide a different insight.

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  • Scott G
  • 21-10-2019

10 minutes of content hidden in a 12+ hour book

This is the book for you if you want to know:

* What the author likes for breakfast
* What type of computer and Internet service the author has
* When and why the author prefers to take public transportation
* What the author listens to while jogging
* How the author likes to exchange documents
* How the author likes to format e-mail messages

Are these people paid by the word? I want my time back!

16 people found this helpful

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  • Gregory B.
  • 20-03-2020

If you want to learn how the author wrote the book this is for you!

The author of this book takes entirely too much time telling you about the process of writing this book. I wanted to learn about the subject of the book. I have no interest in learning about the types of dogs his friends have and places the authors friends live in. The author repeats himself often in strays from the subject far too much for this to be an interesting book.

9 people found this helpful

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  • JM
  • 15-11-2019

Thoroughly boring

Written and read like a bad fiction spy novel. Full of idle speculation. Remind me of the bad conspiracy theory shows on history channel.

5 people found this helpful

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  • jacob
  • 30-10-2019

written by historical amateur's

this book is utterly ridiculous. I think the best way to describe it is by putting it in the same category as those so-called "historians" whom claim that Hitler escaped his Berlin bunker. Even worse, the "evidence" the author uses to prove his points can easily be debunked by the average WW2 enthusiast I advise you not waste your time with this book.

11 people found this helpful

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  • Jeanne B.
  • 25-10-2020

Written by Lieutenant Columbo?

This title may have some facts and insights unknown until its publication. Unfortunately, the author writes way too much about himself and his research. (There are multiple authors listed. For purposes of this review, the singular will be used.)

How many times must the author tell the reader while he was interviewing the old man that he said, "Just one more question"? I fully expected Columbo to jump out of the closet to say, "Just one more thing, sir."

The book is about half "Hidden Nazi" and about half the author's pursuit and feelings about what was learned.

This title could be saved. It needs a good editor, and some judicious pruning.

1) Remove the references to self. Besides being distracting and annoying, it is egotistical. Does the author believe he is the only person who is shocked upon hearing a retelling of an SS Officer shooting a toddler?

2) Edit what is left. Eliminate the repetition of uninformative jargon; "the wife looked, the wife moved, the wife seemed."

3) Organize the book in chronological order of the subject. If a scholarly presentation is desired, add footnotes to reference where and how a particular fact was obtained.

4) A Forward or Afterword may be included to explain how the author found his facts, but keep it out of the main story. If a movie star has brilliant white teeth in a movie, no one wants to know what brand of toothpaste she uses.

I hope this title gets updated.





3 people found this helpful

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  • bill wichterman
  • 23-11-2019

Outstanding book — reads like a novel

This book is very well written, well read, and riveting and persuasive. Highly recommend it.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Lord Emsworth
  • 06-11-2019

Why would America let evil personified walk away?

This book grips the listener at three levels. One, three friends solving a 70-year old historical mystery – in the buddy cop tradition. Two, solving the mystery itself. A mystery where the clues come not in mysterious bloodstains or conveniently dropped matchboxes, but from meticulous review of reams of paper that the government neglected to destroy, redact, or withhold. And three, their quarry. A hideously cruel sadistic man who is the administrative counterpart of Werner Van Braun.

As someone who has read World War II books since 1985, this book had me sitting in the car after I got home, ears flapping to find out what happened next.

The book is a series of unforgettable vignettes:
• Will the Nazi’s ill son see the author?
• A fatherly Holocaust survivor who can describe unspeakable horror matter of factly;
• A loaf of bread tossed into the snow to see if a starving man would go for it, and murdering him if he does;
• Comparing dry sounding memoranda from US Army intelligence that give the listener the chilling realization that they had their man and let him vanish – but why?
• An unexpected package from the FBI;
• What did the Nazi have that was so valuable? Why hide him even from British allies?
• Walking to the spot where the Nazi reportedly shot himself.

This book is the final rebuttal to those who think that there is little remaining to be learnt about World War II aside from crank theories. The prevailing version of history is correct, but it has barely begun to scratch the surface. Nazi Germany was an intricate machine. And this book shows that we’ve just started to grapple with its most complex parts.

Here’s to the next book in the same vein.

2 people found this helpful

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  • LH
  • 23-09-2021

Don't waste your time

The author spends too much time talking about himself. The story could be a very good one but it's not put together in a very well thought out way. And who the author knows or what his children are doing or what he eats has nothing to do with the story.

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  • Heidi M Harris
  • 27-06-2021

In search of…

What the author had for breakfast.
Too bad Leonard Nimoy couldn’t have narrated this. Enjoy this book if you want to listen for 13 hrs. and then decide for yourself what happened.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 24-06-2021

History Fan must

Was very informative and worth the listen this must be added to american history books

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  • A Prince Tavira
  • 16-03-2020

Fascinating and well researched.

A detailed insight into an escapee war criminal that was said to be dead. A well-written book bringing intelligence to life.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Andy Rotchell
  • 27-10-2020

Not so good

Poorly read and written. Sounds like a Clive Cussler novel. Whilst the story is interesting, we don't need to know all about the author's feelings. The story has been passed out with a lot of unnecessary filler. Stick to the facts, they are the most interesting part. The narrator's style is not suited to a book of this sort.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 12-09-2021

couldn't get past the voice sounded robotic

never read it. couldn't get past the voice, sounded robotic. shame as I love stories about world war 2

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  • Evil27
  • 07-09-2021

Utterly compelling. Eye opening.

This is a mightily impressive work by 2 researchers and the author that collaborated with them to produce it. The topic is familiar - Nazis who escaped justice with (very probably) help from the Allies, but the magnitude of Hans Kammler's crimes and the advances that the Germans almost certainly made in rocketry and nuclear weaponry is shocking. There are so many 'what ifs' to ask here - so many alternative histories that were but a hair's breadth away from becoming reality. We may never know how close the Germans were to unleashing nuclear armageddon on the western allies, but we have a very good idea how far the Americans, in particular, were prepared to go to obtain that knowledge for their own purposes and to keep it out of the hands of the Soviet Union. Justice became but a hindrance when such an advantage was to be gained, and the millions that died at the hands of people like Kammler were swiftly forgotten as a result. Remember that next time you see our nations paying lip service to the holocaust and associated tragedies.

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  • Andrew
  • 04-09-2021

A Tale of Known Known's and Unknown Unknown's

Dean Reuter, Colm Lowery and Keith Chester must at times have felt obsessed by the fate of Hans Kammler and therefore I don't think as some other reviewers do that Reuter's telling the story of their journey to find Kammler, and to subsequently set out their research by writing the book, does the finished work any harm at all - I enjoyed the personal insights,

There's was a mammoth undertaking pursuing someone who's fate was known but with a degree of certainty that was in their mind unknown, and became more so the more they dug for clues. Reuter's legal background certainly comes through in his pulling together of evidence, exploring possibilities and making a case. There is much that is known about Kammler, yet there is still more that is not, (or is hidden from view) and this book makes a very brave effort to address the unknown.

For me, a thoroughly good listen and therefore recommended if you have questions about the aftermath of the Second War and an open mind to the possibilities of what beset Kammler and others like him in a post war world where power was being redrawn, this being probably one of the most important determinants in Kammler's fate.

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  • Staupe
  • 29-08-2021

Not to be recommended

I have never given a negative review on a book, but I will do so now. It just doesn't deliver what it states out to do. It is a story of a, although, very competent and critical writer, who gets caught up in a very far-fetched old nazi-conspiricay with the OSS.

It's story can't be ingnored and it is very important that there are people out there who won't accept officiale lines and keep digging, but this story seem to far-fetched

Nonethelesss, kudos for the investigative team for trying, much is probably still hidden from the aftermath of WWII and we need people like this to seek the truth!

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Jo S.
  • 13-08-2021

narrator is awful

Its a fascinating topic and interesting but the narrator makes it hard to focus and appreciate the content.

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