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The Everlasting Man

Narrated by: John Franklyn-Robbins
Length: 11 hrs and 33 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (11 ratings)
Non-member price: $41.00
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Publisher's Summary

Few people had a more profound effect on Christianity in the 20th century than G. K. Chesterton. The Everlasting Man, written in response to an anti-Christian history of humans penned by H.G. Wells, is considered Chesterton’s masterpiece. In it, he explains Christ’s place in history, asserting that the Christian myth carries more weight than other mythologies for one simple reason—it is the truth.

©1953 Oliver Chesterton (P)2003 Recorded Books, LLC

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  • J. Glemby
  • 15-10-2011

well narrated audio of a masterpiece.

As I am aware,there are 3 choices of narration for this great book.1-Dale Alquest at the chesterton society,2-the other narrator here at audible and 3-this new one with john robbins.Dale Alquests reading is very good but a british accent realy is a plus for a british chesterton.The other audible narator is WAY to fast.So this one realy is the best.The sample clip may seem like he has a lisp,which he does a little but he reads very well and at a slow and proper pace with great expression.{note the diference of book time between the two}.Overall ,this is a masterpiece.

37 of 38 people found this review helpful

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  • Jacob Schurder
  • 26-02-2013

Amazingly fresh thinking, in a very old book

Would you consider the audio edition of The Everlasting Man to be better than the print version?

I have not read the printed version, but I did enjoy very much the 'feel' added by the reader. His voice had a rustic feel that added to the ambiance of the book.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

C.S. Lewis used the right phrase, in that the book 'baptises' your intellect. The book has an amazing effect of drawing you out into a different way of thinking, that frankly I found refreshing or more real.

Any additional comments?

If you enjoy Lewis, you will probably enjoy this book. If you enjoy philosophically thinking about man's view of history, you will probably enjoy the book. I love both, and I enjoyed it a lot.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

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  • Candace
  • 23-06-2013

Incredible.

I have to say, as someone who lives for fiction novels, this book by G.K. Chesterton was water to my philosophical soul. I don't think I've ever enjoyed a non-fiction book so much. Chesterton has such a brilliant mind, I had to sometimes rewind certain parts just to listen again. Honestly, he should be required reading for any philosophy student, or any Christian for that matter. It's such a difficult book to explain, but I loved it. I have purchased but have yet to listen to Orthodoxy and Heretics, though I've been told this one, The Everlasting Man, is his best. I have a book of his complete essays as well, which are absolutely hilarious, as well as poignant. I hope that those will be narrated soon as well.

I highly recommend this book to any Christian, and any open-minded non-christian who likes things plainly spoken in a brilliant use of language. Better than C.S. Lewis in my opinion.

17 of 18 people found this review helpful

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  • Vincent Castigliola
  • 08-10-2012

Great Book, incredibly knowledgable author

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Highly recommended. A joy to listen to his analysis of evolution and philosophy on life.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Ramon
  • 31-12-2014

The folly of our world

This book is very pertinent to our current state in the world were very dismal world views are asserting themselves by appealing to a stale secularism, shrouded in scientism, that means to separate men from his God given reason and freedom to explore reality. The clamor for submission to the new ideas proposed by this secular society are deafening, and conformity is demanded of all; just abandon your freedom to think by yourself, and follow the pied piper of folly.
The narrator of this book is excellent, and makes it a pure joy to listen intently as it reveals the beautiful intellect of Chesterton.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • F Morris
  • 02-07-2015

Fantastic

This is a must read for all who believe in God or what to think about Him. His logic and timeless clarity bring fresh air to a world full of unclear thinking.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • R. Ahlrichs
  • 14-05-2015

required reading

this should be read or listened to by any person who is a member of civilization, there is much you take for granted, that might be otherwise. Anthropology anticipated much of the sentiment found here in 20 years after Chesterton wrote it, then promptly forgot. It is a vital and possibly surprising read for the student/professional anthropologist.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Bob C.
  • 08-10-2015

Chesterton the Prophet!

This magnificent book could have been written yesterday and been as poignant as it was nearly a century ago. Chesterton picks apart the "straw man" arguments against Christianity of the secularist movement with wit and wisdom unrivalled by just about anyone except maybe C.S. Lewis - who incidentally, credits this very book as pivotal in his conversion from secular atheism to Christian! It's as enjoyable to listen to as it is to read in my opinion.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • John
  • 02-04-2018

A great and seminal book about Christianity

John Franklin Robbins brings this book vividly to life as no other reader possibly could. His, to me, slight British accent and mastery of voice projection lifts Chesterton's prose to Shakespearean levels. This claim sounds over the top I know but listen for example to the summary or recap at the end of this book first to get an overview of the work. This is an incredibly profound and demanding book to fully grasp. It's a book 'in conversation with H.G. Well's Outline of History which is well worth reading even today in its own right. These post WWI authors were simply giants of their era and apparently the last of their breed. What they said then still resonates today in 'globalist vs 'nationalist' political confrontation. Chesterton's assessment of the "Church" describes a world that faded and died off; but as in the past it may resurrect again if his analysis holds true.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Ethan E. Brown
  • 08-06-2017

Wonderful Mind Making Common Sense of the Mush

Chesterton is obviously brilliant, and his turn of phrase is delightful. Equally wonderful is the inarguability of his arguments, such as whatever painted art on a cave wall was a man, not an animal. This work is sweeping and broad, beginning a an apology for a particular understanding of what it means to be human and ultimately leading to an apology for Christian faith. The performance is delightful. I have no idea what Chesterton actually sounded like, but I suspect Franklyn-Robbins offers a near thing to the real thing. This book was a wonderful experience.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Tim Hutchinson
  • 19-02-2017

Sheer brilliance

I've always enjoyed Chesterton's poetic genius and his bird's eye view perspective on just about everything he puts his mind to. The Everlasting Man is certainly one of his masterpieces. Not only that, it is incredibly relevant for the current modern way the world is going.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • happy reader
  • 29-07-2018

A challenging listen

Excellent narration. Fits the subject matter, which is profound , yet with a light touch.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • MrsGracielaQuinn
  • 14-03-2018

Chesterton at his best

Really enjoyed listening to book. Some innovative ideas to think about. Worth listening. Would recommend.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful