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Publisher's Summary

Virtually anyone, anywhere knows that six million Jewish human beings were killed in the Jewish Holocaust. But how many African human beings were killed in the Black Holocaust - from the start of the European slave trade (c. 1500) to the Civil War (1865)? And how many were enslaved? 

The Black Holocaust, a travesty that killed millions of African human beings, is the most underreported major event in world history. A major economic event for Europe and Asia, a near fatal event for Africa, the seminal event in the history of every African American - if not every American! - and most of us cannot answer the simplest question about it. Here is a sample of what you will get from the painstakingly researched, painfully honest The Black Holocaust for Beginners:

"The total number of slaves imported is not known. It is estimated that nearly 900,000 came to America in the 16th century, two-and-three-quarter million in the 17th century, seven million in the 18th, and over four million in the 19th - perhaps 15 million in total. Probably every slave imported represented, on average, five corpses in Africa or on the high seas. The American slave trade, therefore, meant the elimination of at least 60 million Africans from their fatherland."

©1995 S.E. Anderson (P)2021 Tantor

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  • Judah
  • 28-04-2021

The story that needs to be told

Excellent history on the holocaust of the Israelites last captivity. This was shared and added to my collection.

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