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Publisher's Summary

We’ve all had the experience of reading about a bloody war or shocking crime and asking, “What is the world coming to?” But we seldom ask, “How bad was the world in the past?” In this startling new book, the best-selling cognitive scientist Steven Pinker shows that the world of the past was much worse. In fact, we may be living in the most peaceable era in our species’ existence.

Evidence of a bloody history has always been around us: the genocides in the Old Testament and crucifixions in the New; the gory mutilations in Shakespeare and Grimm; the British monarchs who beheaded their relatives and the American founders who dueled with their rivals; the nonchalant treatment in popular culture of wife-beating, child abuse, and the extermination of native peoples. Now the decline in these brutal practices can be quantified.

With the help of more than a hundred graphs and maps, Pinker presents some astonishing numbers. Tribal warfare was nine times as deadly as war and genocide in the 20th century. The murder rate in medieval Europe was more than thirty times what it is today. Slavery, sadistic punishments, and frivolous executions were unexceptionable features of life for millennia, then suddenly were targeted for abolition. Wars between developed countries have vanished, and even in the developing world, wars kill a fraction of the numbers they did a few decades ago. Rape, battering, hate crimes, deadly riots, child abuse, cruelty to animals — all substantially down.How could this have happened, if human nature has not changed? What led people to stop sacrificing children, stabbing each other at the dinner table, or burning cats and disemboweling criminals as forms of popular entertainment? Was it reading novels, cultivating table manners, fearing the police, or turning their energies to making money? Should the nuclear bomb get the Nobel Peace Prize for preventing World War III? Does rock and roll deserve the blame for the doubling of violence in the 1960s — and abortion deserve credit for the reversal in the 1990s?

Not exactly, Pinker argues. The key to explaining the decline of violence is to understand the inner demons that incline us toward violence (such as revenge, sadism, and tribalism) and the better angels that steer us away. Thanks to the spread of government, literacy, trade, and cosmopolitanism, we increasingly control our impulses, empathize with others, bargain rather than plunder, debunk toxic ideologies, and deploy our powers of reason to reduce the temptations of violence.

With the panache and intellectual zeal that have made his earlier books international best sellers and literary classics, Pinker will force you to rethink your deepest beliefs about progress, modernity, and human nature. This gripping book is sure to be among the most debated of the century so far.

©2011 Steven Pinker (P)2011 Brilliance Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Epic

Vast, enlightening and beautifully read.
This book has actually changed the way I see the world, and appreciate the age in which we live. Maybe humanity is going on the right direction after all.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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great massive book

it is such a big listen but totally worth it a fantastic detailed meditation on violence.

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magnificant must read

it should have been thaught in any high school and university all around the world

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Great Book but Obviously True

This is a fantastic examination of the claim that violence has decreased throughout history, thoroughly researched and evidenced. However that people would think otherwise is obviously a product of nostalgia and poor scholarship. While I didn't need the book to know its premise it is still a brilliant enough work of scholarship that it is worth listening to.

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A Keeper

Well organised, brilliantly read. Depressing. But ultimately illuminating and hopeful. Contributes significantly to my understanding of how we came to be where we are.

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Outstanding book

Eye opening and very enjoyable, regardless of people opinions on the statistical analysis fragments...
I love it!

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Essential reading for everyone

I got so much out of this book. It covers enormous ground but every minute is informative and interesting with good examples. The author is certainly very knowledgeable. So glad I read it.

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Great insights things are looking better

What refreshing insight into how we are not decending into an abyss of violence but an age of enlightenment and humanistic values. Zero sum is only outcome of an aggressive society.

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ONWARDS AND UPWARDS

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Pinker's tome trudges the layways, highways and byways of history to shine light on a path that appears to lead always upward. Flying ever in the face of the popular misconception that the contemporary world is tumbling into a Gotham City scale abyss of crime and destruction, Steven Pinker outlines an arc of growing redemption for our kind

What other book might you compare The Better Angels of Our Nature to, and why?

Similar in tone to the recent works of historian Yuval Noah Harari, The Better Angels of Our Nature outstrips his contemporaries in its display of exhaustive research and rigorous analysis.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

Pinker makes the freshest theories of criminology and sociology comprehensible and directly applicable to the theme of reduction in violence. Employing ideas of 'self-help justice' among marginalized groups, his assessment of the causes of conflict is both enlightening and astute.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

The detailed study of a disturbing array of sadistic punishments employed throughout the ages by our species made for moments of nausea and disgust, nevertheless, the events related are neither gratuitous nor sensationalized.

Any additional comments?

This is an extraordinary work that reveals a life-time's commitment to truth rather than assumption. The author has taken a flow specimen at every bend in the river of human history to examine whether the discharge shows a greater or lesser propensity for fatal toxicity. The conclusions he comes to give reason for cautious optimism as well as motivation to redouble our efforts as a society to value the life of all beings.

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now I believe in the long peace more than ever

amazing book with tonnes of facts and stats to support the findings. Simply one of the best books of all time.

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  • Jeremy
  • 14-05-2012

A Magnum Opus in every sense!

For such a long book, it never gets boring. I was fascinated from start to finish. Pinker has certainly done his research, and the book is packed with references to current research. His analysis of human violence is comprehensive, covering history, philosophy, neuropsychology, evolutionary biology, genetics, social theory, religious beliefs, child rearing practices, theories on the origins of war, demographic correlates of violence and much more on the demons and angels of our nature.

Contrary to what we might think, he argues convincingly that we are getting more humane. No more do we burn cats (or heretics) alive for entertainment. No more do we torture people to death, or subject children to cruel and unusual punishments and even though our weapons of war are deadlier than ever, every life lost - even our enemies, becomes a source of regret.

The book holds several surprises: that literature may be a cause of our greater tolerance of others, that empathy has a dark side in favouritism, that "mirror neurones" do not necessarily make us more humane, that the Flynn effect (increasing IQ) may also be contributing to our capacity for compassion, that the era of "Flower Power" bucked the downward trend with a sharp increase in crime and violence.

We will never be without violence, but for anyone who despairs at the modern world, there is much hope to be found here. It would seem that the angels of empathy, reason, self-control, prudence, fairness, ethical norms, and human rights are slowly winning out against the demons of instrumental violence, sadism, revenge, rage and ideology.

This is such a great book!

21 of 21 people found this review helpful

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  • Judy Corstjens
  • 22-04-2012

Reasons to be happy

Such a wonderful, positive, book. History is not just one damn thing after another; with SP as your guide you can see it as a systematic journey from us being animals to us being (more or less) civilised. Pinker is such an academic that he never gets round to throwing his hat in the air and crowing about how great it is that there are actually reasons to be optimistic and to hope (against the pounding of the 24/7 TV news) that human moral thinking is developing alongside our visible technologies. Still, he does admit that it is p o s s i b l e we are not going to hell in a hand basket, as I previously thought. Bravo Steven!

17 of 17 people found this review helpful

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  • John.P.M
  • 28-12-2012

Superb

For such a big book and a complex subject it is never boring. I have both read the book and listened to it and I recommend it to anyone. Its optimistic premise basically is we are all becoming nicer, It is impossible to sumarise his arguments are cogent and very believable. I know he is right. I grew up in Dublin and i am 45 but in my short life I have seen the realization of civil rights, women,s rights, gay right, children's right and even animal rights.



This book gives a history of our journey to them. it is wonderful.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Rose
  • 10-12-2012

Why we should be happy we're alive today!

This book is an in-depth assessment of violence, and presents the evidence for the decline in violence, and despite that, makes for a really positive, uplifting read!



Although the narrator is sometimes a little 'one-note', it is due to the fact that this is an unabridged version offering every list (for example, of wars) that the book has. There are some amusing parts to the book which I think the narrator covers well.



It's annoying not being able to highlight facts or parts which I found especially interesting, but it's really good to be able to be absorbed in something so complex, challenging and satisfying without having to carry around a book which weighs more than I do.



I'm so glad we no longer set cats on fire for entertainment, relish public torture like crucifixion, or believe that children must be beaten until they bleed daily. This book has cheered me up every day to think of how far we have come!



2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Petra
  • 25-04-2016

All you the ever wanted to know about nastiness

Good - comprehensive, interesting, well researched, amusing, well narrated
Not so good - very long, a bit repetitive
I am glad that I completed this book but I was also glad when it ended.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • David
  • 17-10-2013

Truly a masterpiece

Where does The Better Angels of Our Nature rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

I'm a great fan of Steven Pinker, so I started with a favourable opinion. This one doesn't quite match up to The Blank Slate, but comes close. The subject matter - that the human race is getting progressive less violent - is counter-intuitive, but Pinker's case is made relentlessly, logically and empirically. I was completely convinced. It's dauntingly long and I don't think I would have got through the book, but listening to it worked really well.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Dr
  • 08-07-2013

Fascinating, surprising and at times horrific.

Where does The Better Angels of Our Nature rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

It's definitely up there with the best. Very thought provoking, and life-affirming.

Who was your favorite character and why?

This was a non-fiction publication, and thus there were no characters.

Which character – as performed by Arthur Morey – was your favourite?

This was a non-fiction publication, and thus there were no characters.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It gives one hope that we're actually making progress as a race.

Any additional comments?

Not for the faint hearted - some grim details, and it takes effort, but that effort is very well rewarded.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • G J.
  • 16-09-2018

Truly insightful and thought provoking

The theme of the book is very positive.
It is nice that while some of the subject matter requires the reader to deal with some grim truths of human nature it is an overwhelmingly inspiring account of the potential we humans have to overcome the worst of our own nature.

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  • Mr. I. Ramdewar
  • 15-09-2018

Packed with well considered arguments and evidence

Tough going but packed with well considered arguments and evidence. Pinker combines neuroscience, history, psychology and statistics to demonstrate that modern times are the least violent in history and then explain why.

A good performance by the narrator but Pinker himself is a great speaker. I'd have enjoyed if he'd had read it himself.

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  • Mr. T. L. Scruby
  • 04-09-2018

Unbelievable

Interesting and thought provoking throughout.

I really enjoyed the audiobook, thank you Steven for the hard work to create such a well researched book