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Tank Action

An Armoured Troop Commander's War 1944-45
Narrated by: Roger Davis
Length: 11 hrs and 36 mins
Categories: History, Military
5 out of 5 stars (13 ratings)

Non-member price: $30.38

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Publisher's Summary

A gripping account of the Second World War, from the perspective of a young tank commander.

In 1944, David Render was a 19-year-old second lieutenant fresh from Sandhurst when he was sent to France. Joining the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry five days after the D-Day landings, the combat-hardened men he was sent to command did not expect him to last long. However, in the following weeks of ferocious fighting in which more than 90 per cent of his fellow tank commanders became casualties, his ability to emerge unscathed from countless combat engagements earned him the nickname of the 'Inevitable Mr Render'.  

In Tank Action Render tells his remarkable story, spanning every major episode of the last year of the Second World War from the invasion of Normandy to the fall of Germany. Ultimately it is a story of survival, comradeship and the ability to stand up and be counted as a leader in combat.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio on our desktop site.

©2019 Captain David Render and Stuart Tootal (P)2019 Orion Publishing Group

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    5 out of 5 stars

A great story

This book gives a great insight into what it was like to be a junior officer in an armored regiment in Western Europe in WW2

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 23-09-2019

A Different Point of View

Many tank novels only feature the American's side.
This was very refreshing. I would highly recommend this book if you are looking for a different point of view on tank warfare in WW2.

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  • per
  • 22-09-2019

Very good memoir and thrilling tale.

Very good narrator and good flow of story.
I liked it alot.
Well worth a listen.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 14-10-2019

In at the deep end in WW2, Tank Commander at such<br />

In at the deep end in WW2, Tank Commander at such an early age horrific.

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  • Iolis
  • 28-09-2019

A vivid recollection of war by a young officer

David Render leaves for posterity an account of the actions of his Unit, his Troop and his Tank Crew from their departure on OP OVERLORD through the bloody and exhausting battles of France, Holland and Germany, through to the end of the war.

He recounts his anxieties as a newly-minted officer determined to do his best to win the trust and respect of his crew of seasoned veterans. He tells of his feelings as the war takes its toll on his crew, his fellow officers and himself. He tells of the furious tank battles with German Tiger and Panther tanks in villages and Bocage. Of the carnage suffered by the Infantry. He gives a candid account of what his contemporaries really thought at the time about senior officers in command from Montgomery downwards. He recounts tragic loss in the dying days of the war, of the suffering of civilians, the horror of the concentration camp and his feelings towards the Germans. He does so with honesty and compassion.

What is remarkable about David’s account is that so many of those who fought in that ghastly war were so traumatised by it that they remained silent and took their accounts to the grave. Their numbers dwindle every year as age takes them. I salute David for his courage in re-living his experiences for us and leaving us an honest account of just what his generation went through to leave us the personal and political freedom we have today.