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Publisher's Summary

Before blacks were enfranchised in the 1990s, South Africa was the world's symbol of racism. From the moment the Dutch colonists set foot on the Cape in 1652, this nation steered a straight course toward apartheid, resulting in consistent civil unrest. This presentation explores the economic and social forces that brought South Africa's troubles into the international spotlight.

The World's Political Hot Spots series explains the basis of conflicts in some of the world's most politically sensitive areas. Many of these regions are in today's headlines, and tensions have recently become violent in many of them. Each presentation covers up to 10 centuries of background, revealing how and why today's problems occur.

Edited by Wendy McElroy and produced by Pat Childs.

Don't miss other titles in the World's Political Hot Spots series.
©1991 Carmichael & Carmichael, Inc. / Knowledge Products (P)1991 Carmichael & Carmichael, Inc. / Knowledge Products

What listeners say about South Africa

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  • Shipwrecked
  • 01-10-2020

Excelllent for what it attempts, though outdated

A superb short, high-level overview of South African history (though only starting with European colonization and with almost no focus on the history of native African societies). I wanted to get a bird’s-eye view of the timeline and key events before delving deeper into the history, and this was perfect in that regard. It’s dated from 1991, so ends before the end of apartheid and the ANC victory in the 1994 elections. But it relies heavily on quotes from historical figures and so gives a real flavor of the tone of public discourse from different periods. Not sure how accurate the accents were, but appreciated the effort to convey them.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Kindle Customer
  • 31-12-2020

A very short history.....

This is a shortened version of the very complex history of South Africa. The author has highlighted some of the major points that has shaped South Africa into what she is today.

South African History is very rich and diverse, so for someone just want an extremely brief overview, this is the book to listen to.

I, however, enjoy all the extra little details about history, and that’s the only reason I have given this book 3 stars.

The narration was well done by all and definitely lifted the book in interest.

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  • Sipho Ngidi
  • 14-12-2020

The completeness of the book

There’s inadequate cover given to black resistance to domination in this book. It is a pity.

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  • Salatiso
  • 15-11-2020

Brief but informative

Enjoyed the informative presentation, both content and presenters. Like others we've been through the worst to get to here, it's a pity that instead of learning from the past we are repeating the same mistakes.

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  • Artis Filips
  • 22-10-2020

Reflection

pretty reasonable summary for the political and socioeconomic processes and landscape of the area . thanks

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  • Lourens Janse van Rensburg
  • 24-04-2009

Many un-researched assumptions

The author makes many assumptions which have not been properly researched, for example:

* "... In 1962, Nelson Mandela, a leader of the band African National Congress, was on trial because he had left the country without permission..." If the author had done proper research he would have found that Nelson Mandela was indeed on trial, but NOT because he left the country without permission. He fled the country because he was wanted by the police for instigating industrial strikes -- a well documented fact that would have been found with the smallest amount of research. In any country in the world, if you or I or any reader instigates industrial strikes costing his home country many millions in lost wages, lost production, lost jobs and lost taxes, and then flees his home country, would the governemnt of that country not prosecute that person, regardless of skin colour?

* "...From the moment the Dutch colonists set foot on the Cape in 1652, this nation steered a straight course toward apartheid..." Letters of sailors and diaries of many ships' captains, the most famous being the "Scheepsjournael ende Daghregister" (ship's journal and diary) of Jan van Riebeeck, document the fact that the Cape of Good Hope was uninhabited wilderness when the Dutch settled there in 1652. After setting foot on the Cape of Good Hope, it was many days before they met some wanderers of the Khoi-Khoi and Khoi-San (Bushmen) -- these were wanderers and were not displaced from the land by the Dutch, because they did not inhabit it on a permanent basis. The Dutch later imported slaves from Malaysia because there was no local population to enslave. The Dutch established he first trading post to supply fresh fruit and food supplies to the benefit of all seafaring nations on the trading route to India. These facts are easy to find, had the author taken even the slightest trouble to do any unbiased research.

8 people found this helpful

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