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Publisher's Summary

Why do we do what we do? Especially those seemingly inexplicable behaviors—from the disreputable to the downright despicable?

Between what can be learned from evolutionary psychology (thinking that has developed in our species over the millennia to ensure its propagation) and cognitive science (how our minds literally think) a picture emerges. In Sex, Murder, and the Meaning of Life, social psychologist Douglas Kenrick fuses these two fields to create a coherent story of human nature.

In his analysis, many ingrained, apparently irrational behaviors—one-night stands, prejudice, conspicuous consumption, even art and religious devotion—are quite explicable and (when desired) avoidable. When combined with insights from complexity theory, Kenrick’s argument reveals how simple mechanisms give rise to complex life.

Through an engaging blend of anecdote, analogy, and research findings, Sex, Murder, and the Meaning of Life takes listeners on a singular tour of the human mind, exploring the pitfalls and promises of our biological inheritance.

©2011 Original material © 2011 Douglas T. Kenrick. Recorded by arrangement with Basic Books, a member of the Perseus Books Group. (P)2011 HighBridge Company

What listeners say about Sex, Murder, and the Meaning of Life

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  • beinbloom
  • 10-11-2015

skip it

the author was self-absorbed. he brags about his 3 wives getting 10 years younger each time. it's all about him.

6 people found this helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Laurie Frick
  • 21-07-2011

Rather dated and self-aggrandizing

Kenrick's frame of reference, examples and tone is very dated. All of his examples and chapter beginnings are about himself, which you would expect would humanize the book and help it move along. Instead it's heavy, dull and incredibly self-aggrandizing. Other books in the Neuro-lit category are much, much better. Avoid this one.

12 people found this helpful

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  • rosieBCPD1
  • 10-06-2014

Research Results on Superficial People

What disappointed you about Sex, Murder, and the Meaning of Life?

The book recites the results of studies showing that older men like younger women and if men look at too much porn the can only find photoshopped, triple D women attractive. I think he needs to look at his research practice and filter out douchebags and dirty old men from his studies.

3 people found this helpful

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  • Traci
  • 31-08-2011

Terrible Narrator

I bought this book because the subject matter seemed extremely interesting. Unfortunately, I can't even listen to it because Fred Stella is a terrible narrator. He over annunciates words and makes a book that could have been interesting, dull. His style reminds me of how students read when I was in middle school. If you can get past the narrator you may enjoy this book, personally I'm going to read it instead.

6 people found this helpful

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  • Jonathon Winter
  • 17-12-2013

Dated, self-aggrandizing, and shallow

What disappointed you about Sex, Murder, and the Meaning of Life?

Compared to other texts - such as Robert Wright's "The Moral Animal" - this text is shallow and appears dated. Additionally, the author's focus on his own life - and corresponding relationship failures - felt both self-important and unimpressive. Overall, disappointed.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Ben
  • 20-08-2012

A harmony of personal stories and science

The authors frankness about his own life and how it related to studies was what kept me interested in this book over many other similar books I have read. I thoroughly enjoyed it and walked away with at least two concepts of human behavior that will change how I view humanity forever. If you like behavioral science and real life examples of how and why humans do what they do I recommend this right up there next to "The Happiness Hypothesis" which can also be found here on Audible.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Occasional Reviewer
  • 08-10-2012

Good introduction to evolutionary pscyhology

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

yes, clear overview

Would you listen to another book narrated by Fred Stella?

Fred Stella did a superb job. I had to keep reminding myself that it wasn't actually Kenrick speaking.

Any additional comments?

Kenrick is good with anecdotes and has a personable manner. He was one of the earliest researchers in evolutionary psychology and has done a good deal of primary research, so he gives an insider's view of developments in the field. The story has a narrative trajectory, beginning with the early efforts to overcome mass resistance to biological explanations and concluding in a serene late stage, with the revolution more or less completed.

Kenrick accepts the idea of massive modularity but at least systemizes modules by appealing effectively to human life history theory. He doesn't adequately register the way evolutionary psychology has finally succeeded in assimilating the idea of general intelligence, so his concept of human behavior retains the inflexibility that was a crucial limitation in early evolutionary psychology. Theoretically, humans remain robots animated by an array of basic motives automatically elicited by specific environmental inputs. They lack the power of altering behavior by envisioning their own identities extending over time, connecting to social networks beyond the immediate sensory field, and subject to norms, values, and beliefs. But that's only theoretically. Kenrick has enough wisdom, as a narrator, to see beyond some of the limitations in his theoretical model.

The wider evolutionary vision of human nature now takes in "group selection" as part of "multi-level selection." It also takes in the idea of "gene-culture co-evolution." Kenrick doesn't get that far. He reduces human behavior to three causal principles: inclusive fitness, differential parental investment, and reciprocal altruism (Hamilton, Trivers, and Trivers). He shows clearly just how far those three causes can take us in understanding human behavior. He thus also lets us see the limitations in those three explanatory principles.He reduces all mental effort to status striving, itself reduced to mating displays.

Inclusive fitness and differential parental investment account for so much of all animal behavior that evolutionary psychologists can produce a reasonable facsimile of human nature by treating humans as if they have adaptive capabilities no different from those of birds, chimps, and meerkats.That leaves out specifically and singularly human activities and accomplishments: technology, science, trade, philosophy, history, aesthetics, religion, myth, the arts, music, narrative, and ideology. All of human civilization is accounted for by waving airily at the peacock's tail.

Like most evolutionary psychologists even now, Kenrick essentially explains away the human mind. Evolutionary thinkers have only just recently begun to make real progress in understanding gene-culture co-evolution, and Kenrick has made no effort to include those recent and still rudimentary advances. He can thus explain human behavior only in the degree to which it is indistinguishable from the behavior of other dual parenting species or other species capable of cooperative group endeavor.

2 people found this helpful

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  • vikingpoptarts
  • 25-05-2021

Comes off like a weird sermon

To be fair, I didn't finish this, I only made it to chapter 6. From me, that in itself is a review because I'm a bit of a completionist and try to finish everything I start... I'm just not interested in anything else it has to say.

I really should have read the reviews because the first few you see are pretty spot on. This comes off weirdly as some old guy writing a manifesto about how it's natural for men to be attracted to younger women and women looking for resources. Like. We get it bro, you like little girls and you think all they're interested in is money. Let's move on. The personal brags also just make it evident this is a weird guy.

The big problem with this, though is it's not objective and he said so much where I left of. To paraphrase, essentially he's explaining why his opinion makes something right despite criticisms he's been given.

You want to give the benefit of the doubt, but that was the "not worth my time" nail in the coffin for me. I don't buy a book on a subject to get a memoir in disguise from a biased author. I get it, a lot of authors do this and it's ok, they're trying to get you to connect to the material, but the material here barely holds weight. There are several points I noticed in this where I recognized the data given, but also that certain other bits were conveniently left out to support his narrative.

On a whole, disappointing. If you're looking for something with a bit more weight about human nature and an only slightly annoying butt-ins about the author's life, I just finished "the anatomy of violence", which was good and hits topics this should have from a respectable research standpoint along with good detail and pace.

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  • CMH
  • 26-05-2016

love this book

I only bought it because the title was very catchy. but it turned out to be an amazing book, I highly recommend it and I also recommend " influence by Robert cialdini"

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  • Danny Derby
  • 21-02-2015

an intro to sociobiology

i had this book for a long time and finally got to readcit, written in a fun to read way. it is highly recommended

1 person found this helpful

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  • Mark @ M12
  • 17-11-2013

A whistle top tour of many interesting ideas

This audiobook covers a few different areas and brings them together in a way that is a compelling and interesting listen... so much so, I was tempted to mark it down for being too short... until I realised that it was just a case that seven hours has flown by!

I've read / listened around some of these topics before, yet there were still nuggets of new information here... religion and mating strategies for one... so even for the well-read it is worth a listen.

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  • A-AI
  • 11-10-2018

either you one deep down or are blown away

absolutely amazing insights, scientifically grounded with research studies to back up claims, connecting literature dots of a giant web, as if walking through time and space and societies. this book helped me understand so much about me and others...I can only recommend it to anyone who wants to start digging...

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  • Pepe
  • 25-12-2016

An inspiring reading

This book gives a world view based on science that helps to understand our behaviours and those of people around us. It contains clues to a better and more fulfilled life.

In the spirit of reconciliation, Audible Australia acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples today.