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Publisher's Summary

When you discover the world is a computer program, and you figure out that by altering the code you can time travel and perform acts that seem like magic, what can possibly go wrong?

Pretty much everything.

Just ask Brit, who has jumped around in time with such abandon that she has to coexist with multiple versions of herself. Now, Brit the Elder finds that her memories don't match Brit the Younger's. And there's the small matter of a glitch that's making Brit the Elder's body fritz out. Brit the Elder's ex-boyfriend Phillip wants to help her, but he'll have to keep it secret from his current girlfriend, Brit the Younger, who can't stand her future self.

Meanwhile, Martin is trying to protect Phillip from a relentless attacker he somehow hasn't noticed; Gwen is angry because Martin accidentally proposed to her; Gary tries to help the less fortunate, with predictably disastrous results; and an old nemesis might have to be the one to save them all.

In Out of Spite, Out of Mind, our fearless wizards discover the biggest glitch in their world's program may well be themselves.

©2018 Scott Meyer (P)2018 Audible Originals, LLC.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

simple fun.

stays true to the tone and standard of this series. good for some simple fun and entertainment.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Nicely recovered

Still love the concept though it was starting to lose its way a bit in the last books. This is a good recovery back to firmer footing. I especially like the run around for the agents. Nicely done.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

brilliant book but beyond brilliant storytelling

Luke Daniels makes these books come alive through his fabulous voice acting. start with the first book and you'll never look back.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

It was OK...

I find the fact that most of the main characters act obtuse and stupid most of the time to be very off-putting.

And the idea that fate is fixed not because of fate itself but because of the hard work put forth by the main characters to recreate all the things they experienced in different time lines is crazy.

Brit actually spends 2 months working out a set of dance moves just because she saw her older self come back in time and do it. Stupid and frustrating.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Unsatisfying but fun

The story alluded to the purpose of the simulation, and to how it works. Ultimately it was just another pointless lark using already defined events, lore and characters.

Its a shame the series has stagnated like this. A new wizard would have been nice. Even better would be access to another simulation, or solutions to the lead church paradox.

Meh.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Great addition to the series

Great book with good narration, it is a bit short though, can't wait for the next book

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Another great installment

Love the series, Scott Meyer delivers the goods again in the 5th book of the series.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Phillips my boy

enjoyed it, had the usual laughs and good progression of the story.

my only sticking point is how unfair everything is to Phillip! nuff said.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Lovely as always!

it's too short, that's my biggest problem! xD

But if you liked the previous books I'd say you're gonna like this one just as much! Though I do think the main plot was slightly better in the previous books I'm looking forward to the next one!

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • M. E. Halstead
  • 05-07-2018

The title is the story.

Kind of defeats the feminist bent of the overall series by writing a story where a woman is so ruled by emotion she almost glitches the universe into oblivion just because her boyfriend secretly talked to other women (I don't think that's a spoiler).

I don't know, I enjoy the series but I wish the author wouldn't write every single character as if they're complete morons.

30 of 31 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Joel
  • 01-07-2018

Scott, how do you think women are supposed to act?

Seriously, though. Gwen? She's angry until suddenly without context she's not and all Martin does is be honest and forthright with her. The Brits? They're normal until Philip tries his best to save them all and has to keep things from them/her. All be ever did was his very best to help and was forced to lie. The resolution is deeply unfair and unsatisfying on all sides and NOBODY else in the cast calls out Brit for being a bitch or being irrational. Honestly, this would have been a better resolution if Brit had died. The book is a slow, downhill slide into yet another unsatisfying resolution and a little lead in to another story where I'm sure it will be yet another downhill slide into mediocrity. Scott, please. You can do better than this. the first book proved that. your characters have gone from goofy and lovable to increasingly one dimensional and rigid.

58 of 61 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • harbinger
  • 11-07-2018

A Philip to Remember / A Britt To Forget

**MAJOR SPOILERS AHEAD!**

I adore the Magic 2.0 series - I fell in love with the world, the characters and their adventures through medieval England, Atlantis, and the rest. Luke Daniels is an absolute wizard in bringing these characters to life, and I applaud Scott Meyers for never resting on his laurels, and taking chances with books 3 (fun!), 4 (Honor fail) and 5.

With Out of Spite, Out of Mind, the Phillip//Britt pairing is the main event, representing fatalism vs. free will. And that's interesting! Where it quickly falls apart is 1) how condescending (at best) and spiteful (hence the title???) Britt becomes and 2) how idiotic she behaves. It's the second part that I take issue with Meyer, because Britt was a pretty awesome character until recently.

So, to recap: Britt is two people; younger Britt resents older Britt; elder Britt notices a glitch caused by the two co-existing; elder Britt enlists Phillip to help her solve the problem and keep it a secret from Phillip, lest they destroy everyone/everything; younger Britt finds out and accuses Phillip of cheating on him; not-so-young Britt "saves the day" by fixing elder Britt, but not before encoding fake memories of Phillip cheating on her, thereby preserving the time loop and fulfilling her (elder Britt's) destiny of not being with Phillip.

To my first point, the characters in the book show little to no sympathy toward Phillip, with the main character Martin being unhelpful at best. Britt absolutely brutalizes Phillip, accusing him of cheating (with herself???) and then implanting her future self with false memories to ensure this becomes elder Britt's reality. How horrific. How sadistic.

But the fact that Phillip is posterized by Britt is a quibble compared to point numero dos - Britt's logic is completely faulty. If she allows herself to love Phillip, believing in HIS idea that free will exists (that each person can make decisions independently), and that determinism is false, she completely screws the pooch by essentially acting toward self-sabotage and preserving the timeline (i.e., free will doesn't exist, so I'm just going to do what I was going to do anyway).

Do you see the problem there? The Brit I know is way, way smarter than that. She is essentially acting OUT OF CHARACTER to push this plot forward. Phillip is not collaborating with elder Brit to save elder Brit - he is, at the end of the day, trying desperately to save younger Brit. Younger Brit somehow interprets this to be tantamount to cheating, and then acts to ensure the miserable outcome that is this book, which doesn't really prove her point (that what will be will be) since she ultimately decided the resolution of elder Brit's fate. And decides to cover her tracks by erasing the truth and replacing it with a falsehood about Phillip's infidelity...uhhh, good job Brit!

I can see where this is all going, but it just pains me when characters act of our character in order for the plot to work in certain ways. Gwen is no charmer, either, and I'm puzzled at how little chemistry both couples have with one another. Mr. Meyer - most of us are ride-or-die fans, and we're too invested to give up on these characters. I'm certain that Phillip and to a lesser extent Martin will get their comeuppance (for essentially being good, normal guys), but the fact that I'm expecting this comeuppance against the loves of their lives is really weird, mean-spirited, bizarre, out of character, etc.

Thank you for taking some chances, and taking us to some unexplored territory, but please hide the puppet strings a bit better when having the characters do what they need to do in service of the entire story. Characters by their nature are in service to the story, but maybe the story should be in service to them, as well (ooh! story/determinism vs. character/free will!)

27 of 28 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • ♡Louise♡
  • 21-06-2018

Not what I was hoping for.

Excellent narration by Luke Daniels as always.

This book in the series was not as light hearted and fun as the previous books.

Seeing the cover (honestly, I didn’t even read the synopsis before buying it - Magic 2.0 books are an auto buy for me) - I was expecting some fun interactions with many multiple versions of Brit.
Yes, there were multiple versions of Brit interacting together, but it wasn’t fun. Snooty, bitchy, grumpy... but not fun.

We know from previous books that future Brit and and future Philip are not a couple, but this is the book we find out why...... and well, Brit is a spiteful bitch.

Sounds like the next book should be interesting from the way this one ended. I just hope Mr. Meyer’s gives Philip a better happier storyline than what it looks like the future holds for him.

Looking forward to book 6 !

54 of 57 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 26-06-2018

Dont Bother

Small spoilers ahead:
Rather than listen to this, just read the last chapter and move on. It's literally the only thing that adds to the plot. Everything else in the story adds nothing and destroys any depth that anyone but Philip had. Outside of a few funny side-stories, the main story is literally just Brit ruining Philip's life because a future version of her did it to her; so, she has to do it because.... idk... no free will? That's it. That's her only reasoning, and everyone aside from Philip seems to accept this as a valid argument. Don't waste your money. Absolutely no development or growth here.

Props to the narrator, though. 10/10

Huge Spoilers after:

Philip listens to Old Brit when she tells him not to tell young Brit about what was going in with Old Brit FOR HER OWN SAFETY. Young Brit (despite believing she will one day be old Brit) decides that it's all Philip's fault for listening to old Brit and he should have ignored Old Brit's warning and told her. She breaks up with him, and to top it off she changes her own memories of the events to believe that Philip cheated on her; so, that way she'll never forgive him.... for trying to protect her(?). That's it. that's the entire plot, and EVERYONE sides with Brit. No one even questions it. Like... come on. What an awful story. How could anyone honestly believe she's in the right. What a completely garbage human being.
Complete letdown. Was really hoping the cliffhanger from Book 4 actually meant something, butttt.... NOPE

36 of 38 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Chris Hauber
  • 07-07-2018

Don't read this one.

The title of this book describes Brits motivation and mental status perfectly. Seriously, if you have any love for these characters then do not listen to this book at all. Just pretend there was no foreshadowing problem at the end of the last book, and that all of the characters continue to live their lives the in their goofy but charming way. You'll be much happier.

20 of 21 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Blake Jones
  • 02-07-2018

Brit is a sedistic monster.

The amount of damage she inflicts on others and the univers is amazing. She's good enough to be a Lovecraft monster. Yet she gets away with it all.

19 of 20 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 08-07-2018

Disappointing

This book was like a dog turd on a golf course. I feel like the author was going for a Empire Strikes Back feel and ended up with an unhappy ending and a big screw you to a couple main characters, turning one into a putz and the other into a villian.

28 of 30 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Doug
  • 09-07-2018

Least Favorite of the series so far

I guess maybe this book was written to set up future plots, but it really didn't seem to have much of a point. it didn't seem to me to flow very well or hold my interest nearly as much as the first four books of the series.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Taylor
  • 06-07-2018

A Book Series Oddly Sexist Against Men

I can't help but notice that the women in these books are smart and confident and always know better than the men while the men are bumbling pools that trip every chance they get. the women almost never make a mistake get punished or lose face. of course this is related you can hardly be punished if you never make a mistake but what about this book where the entire plot it's the fault of one of the women?

spoilers ahead. I don't mean to concentrate entirely on sexism but in this day and age where feminists get all the attention I feel I need to.

so a man makes a mistake. he lies to his girlfriend to help her greatest enemy in a life-threatening situation. he does everything he can to help her and in the end through that woman's own action something terrible happens. keep in mind all this man has done is try to help someone in need and lie to his girlfriend three or four times, something that he is incredibly guilty about. his girlfriend's next logical action is the break up with him and rewrite her own memories and this other woman's memories so that they all believe that he was cheating on them, even after seeing the sorry state that he becomes in 2 months. this man is punished for the rest of his eternal life by his ex girlfriend who he still loves believing that he cheated on her and every time he denies it, that he is still lying to her.

this is terribly tragic and honestly it's a great plot device but the thing I can't stand is that every other character stands by her on this decision without hesitation. nobody calls her out on this reprehensible Behavior. she just psychologically destroys a man and completely gets away with it with the only punishment being undoing her own mistake.

I really do love how this book is written but I'm so tired of men always being the punching bag and also be expected to just take the punches. I'm so tired of men always being the idiots and women always being the ones who know better as if they never make mistakes too. for God's sake everyone in this book is an adult yet this man is punished for the most juvenile of offenses with the harshest sentence

if this character returns in the future and I'm expected to think of her as anything less than a woman who has made a reprehensibly amoral decision then this book really is sexist. right now I feel like the book only has sexist undertones that aren't really purposeful, and is blindly following the dumb guy trope set forth by The Simpsons.

apologies for any grammatical errors this entire review was written through text to speech

edit: so I have a few more things to say.

my main point is if the gender roles were reversed and it was a girlfriend lying to a boyfriend for his own good and trying to save someone who is in a life-threatening situation and he accuses her of cheating and rewrite his own memory so he blames her for cheating constantly accusing her of that crime it would be terrible but if it's a woman doing it to a man it's not a big deal.

I'm well aware that men and women are not the same. men and women should be treated equally especially in the eyes of the law but we are still not the same. the problem comes from the book treating women like they're always so much better than men. there is literally a line in the book that insinuates that men mindlessly fight where is women always need a reason, which is only so true as they typically end up manufacturing that reason for themselves just like men do. there are many instances of lines like these in these books.

I do love these books still this kind of thing just gets on my nerves. the second book literally had powerful women being served by Buff Burley attractive men and if the roles were reversed and it was men who are being served by incredibly large chested and attractive women it would be totally inappropriate which was part of why the second book was so funny and so good because with the roles reversed women are just as likely to fall in the same pit traps as men are. it's still the same brain just swimming in a slightly different chemical cocktail.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • J Breckenridge
  • 21-06-2018

Better than 4 not as good as 1,2 or 3.

SoI love these books - just going to say that first. They are all great in there own ways.

For me books 1 and 2 were really well done and book 3 was a smart way to incorporate new/old people in to the mix, book 4 was the odd one out but book 5 does tie in to it.

The entire book just felt very angry and shouty, they are all friends but just constantly shout at each other like they hate each other. Im starting to get sick of gwen and her constantly beating martin up (so to speak), i dont really get what he sees in her!

The Brits stuff got even more silly and complicated and found myself thinking when is this going to end. Some parts of the stroy just felt they were there for the sake of being there and did feel like they dragged on.

Having said all that, the last 5/6 chapters were funny and a bit more mystic as per the first books and i really enjoyed that, i am excited for the next set of books based on the end, but i did see the plot twist coming. (still a good twist)

There are some really laugh out loud parts of the story and some really silly parts that make it a magic 2.0 book. I think the references to more modern day stuff got a little out of in some places but thats no biggie! As per usual Luke does a fantastic job with the story telling and plays the parts very well, he is 50% of the reasons for coming back.

Scott did a great job on make another fun adventure to the series and i am still very much a fan and eager to listen to the next one.

For me this was very much make or break based on the last book, and currently i feel like its a make.. but just.

My advice is, if you have a credit and you like the series it wont feel like a waste of a credit. its still fun and part of the series, its anther silly adventure that gets out of hand and thats great. Like what i said about the last book, not sure i would pay full price to listen to this.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Kyle Griffiths
  • 11-07-2018

The End of a Great Series

This might be a little spoiler-y, I'll try to minimise it as much as possible.

Not as weak story-wise as the 4th, but the worst novel of the bunch. Why?

A genuinely interesting logic hole was created at the end of the 4th, allowing for some truly interesting character developing and perhaps a chance to learn more about the mysterious program. No. Slammed shut with a really uninspired "you can't change what's going to happen!" approach. Which is fair enough, but out of the many, many times that showed up in the book, only one of those had a reasoning other than "it happened in the future, so we have to!" which is quite honestly the weakest way that the author could have done it.

You're telling me that nobody even considered not doing it, even when Philip, as established in previous books, would've insisted they didn't and would've told them to "SHUT UP" if they mentioned it?

The Brit sequence was massively overdone, way too complicated and full of the same ridiculousness as previously mentioned. I was hoping for it to end about halfway through. The author has managed to take one of the most interesting characters, completely dilute what made them interesting through repetition to the point where it's honestly just tedious and annoying, and then give a daft justification for a super-cruel act which just results in the reader REALLY disliking that character.

The point of this book seems just to make you dislike certain characters in order to drive drama that suddenly appeared out of nowhere. The previous 4 books established that the characters were smart (in their own way) and makes you able to expect what they'd say. This one throws that all out of the window with the "you can't change it!" and forces everyone to make really stupid decisions. Again, without justification.

There are some good laughs in here, like all the books, but they're so overshadowed by, just, well, the actual story itself.

The narrator, Luke Daniels, did a fantastic performance as always. Consistent (mostly) over five audiobooks, great voices and a lot of character. Great job.

Unsatisfying. (The ending is practically a Deus Ex Machina for crying out loud.) Unfun. There were so many options open to this series for more fun romps like 1-3, (4 was a bit dumb, quite filler-y, but it at least fit the core idea) but instead the author is more interested in writing a not-even-geeky-anymore reality show focused on the hollow corpses of the characters we've grown to love. I very much doubt that Meyer will be able to fix the damage done to this series with the next book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Gary
  • 07-07-2018

I had high hopes

I really liked the first three books in this series, I laughed, I thought and I enjoyed. But this one...

I think Scott Meyers is running out of ideas, like Daniels was brilliant as always and the quality of the sound is audible’s high standard but the plot...without giving anything away, could have been a lot more, it was pointless. Unfortunately this is not dissimilar to book 4 on level of “where is the story?”.

Seriously, if you liked books 1,2,3. Stop there.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Slane
  • 27-06-2018

Why?

I loved the previous books but this one for me missed to mark. I'm sure the writer believed he was being clever with the story line but it drones on with no real substantial point, so much so that I'm left feeling cheated. One of the best characters was treated with utter contempt as to just alianate the audiance. As for the 'plot twist' if you didn't have to guess at who the two assistants were defore the end of the book even told you. As for being friends with Martin's and Quen's enemy at the time of their wedding I'd be pleasantly surprised if it didn't turn out to be Phillip.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Richard
  • 25-06-2018

I loved 1,2 and 3 and kind of enjoyed 4.But...

... this was by far the weakest so far.

The idea of getting to know more about the world really had me interested. But by the second half I had given up any hope and realised that this was nothing more than a weak, character destroying, overly exaggerated and at sometimes quite sexist story.

The performance however, as always, was amazing.

9 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 27-06-2018

And the ending to the last one seemed so promising

There are various tropes in books after years of reading Fantasy that I have honestly begun to annoy me when they come up but the two I generally dislike the most are

You Can't Fight Fate and Idiot Ball (This series is awash with other tropes but these two I feel I have to mention)

You can't fight fate is kind self-explanatory. The character is either given a vague, cryptic or even direct message of the future and despite what the characters do, it happens. Now I knew from the earlier books this was a major theme in the story. But the funny characters and scenarios were good enough to override that... but the ending to the last story gave me hope. It suggested that actually.... there was a difference. There was some small anomaly that could finally become, after a full book covering the plot, lead to there being free will... but no. The entire book is formed on the entire idea that there is no free will. That in one scenario the characters will in fact go to great lengths, spend days upon days of practise and effort to re-enact a fight scene they saw their future selves do, for no actual reason then because they believe they have to do it. They put physical effort into making sure fate is right even when they actively don't want it to happen.

Idiot Ball is when smart characters do and say seemingly stupid things. This is so common in this book it is painful. Every attempt to by one character to describe something to another character seems just painfully worded enough to lead to some incident, either for humour or for plot. Every time the characters say "I'm going to change the past or future" and sit back screaming internally at the pages going "WHY?! YOU KNOW THAT WON'T WORK!!"

This book is stuffed to bits with these tropes, over and over.... and finally... the last big event with Brit and Phillip is downright horrible.

I don't know why Scott Meyer decided to right this scenario out, but... well.

To summarise, Philip at the start of the book is asked by Brit the Elder to help her cure a glitch she has. She threatens Philip with "If you tell my younger self, the universe will implode". He believes her but makes it clear over and over that he hates hiding things from younger Brit but in secret, goes to the future to help figure out what is causing the glitch.

That is what Philip did.... I won't even bother explaining all the arguments and speeches after Brit the younger finds out the truth, but in the end... she refuses to let Philip apologies and re-writes her's and every other version of herselves own memories so they all believe Philip did in fact cheat on her... and they even say, after the mind wipe, that they have forgiven him but not really, even in the long distant future.

I won't go into how immoral and cruel that is, to take a single, very debatable mistake and explode it into a literal "I hate you and I will make up an even worse scenario in my head to hate you for all time"...

.... but on the good side, I get the title now... very clever.

... I think I'm done with this series.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Chris parry
  • 22-06-2018

Absolutely rubbish!

Don’t be fooled by the positive reviews like I was. This series should have finished after the 3rd book. This story makes you hate all the characters buy the end of the book except Philip and Miller... that’s not a spoiler don’t worry. Narrator was great as usual but story was irritatingly stupid. If you thought the dragons were bad this is worse!

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Steve
  • 29-08-2018

very, very boring.

very boring. not very funny. slow and pondering.

very little to recommend it.

shame. I really liked the other books in the series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Kindle Customer
  • 29-07-2018

Mostly good but infuriating at points

I liked the set-up and mystery in this and enjoyed most of the book, even having sympathy at one point for Brit the elder when she expresses distaste at the way she deels she has to act (up until then she always seemed to me unlikeable and unpleasant).

Then the end came.

Firstly it felt like a dissapointing cop-out and so much less interesting than it could have been and it undermined everything leading up to it.

Secondly (and for me the worst thing in the book), Brit makes a truly horrible and manipulative decision/action which almost all the other characters accept without pointing out how wrong it is, or calling her to account. It makes zero sense to me and I find the whole thing so infuriating, not only because it is terribly unjust to a good person, but because it makes me think less of almost all the other characters.

I found Brit (the elder) hard to take in book 2, and felt then it was weird that other characters were not judging her appalling behaviour but this book manages to take it up a notch. To be honest I have never understood how Brit the younger (who mostly seemed fine) could suddenly become someone who is so horrible, nor why anyone likes her when she does.

Despite enjoying most of the book I'm not sure if I can listen to any future magic 2.0 books as the end of this one made me so infuriated. In a way I wish I hadn't listened to this one, though mostly I just wish it had a different ending.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • B.Nesbit
  • 23-07-2018

Good.. But

Enjoyed it but not as much as the earlier one.
Still fun though but 😁

1 of 1 people found this review helpful