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Publisher's Summary

This is one of the most accessible of Nietzsche's works. It was published in 1887, a year after Beyond Good and Evil, and he intended it to be a continuation of the investigation into the theme of morality. In the first work, Nietzsche attacked the notion of morality as nothing more than institutionalized weakness, and he criticized past philosophers for their unquestioning acceptance of moral precepts. In On the Genealogy of Morals, subtitled "A Polemic", Nietzsche furthers his pursuit of a clarity that is less tainted by imposed prejudices. He looks at the way attitudes towards 'morality' evolved and the way congenital ideas of morality were heavily colored by the Judaic and Christian traditions.

Public Domain (P)2013 Naxos AudioBooks

What listeners say about On the Genealogy of Morals

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  • James
  • 08-02-2017

An Essential Precursor to Evolutionary Psychology

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend this work to my more free-thinking friends and to those who want to challenge themselves intellectually. Nietzsche's words are bolts of lightning which wake us from our sleep.

Who was your favorite character and why?

My favorite character was "the ascetic man" because I had never seen through his disguise so clearly until I listened to this work. I also realized how much I have been seduced by his perspective throughout my life.

Which scene was your favorite?

Since this was a non-fiction work, I will put forth my favorite section rather than scene...I was most interested in the section on the nature of punishment. This section demonstrated how punishment originally arose as a way for the powerful to demonstrate this power.It also deals with the transformation of this phenomenon after the "slave revolt in morals." The "sick" man becomes "master" of himself and punishes himself by submitting to religion and filtering both his resentments and hopes through this narcotic denial of life.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Nietzsche provides much food for thought, but I was very much moved by his description of master/slave moralities and the creditor/debtor carryover into morality. Though I would tweak his critiques based on modern evolutionary psychology, he provides much provocative insight and gets behind the scenes of our moral realities.

Any additional comments?

Not for the faint-of-heart or easily offended...

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  • D Willis
  • 05-12-2017

Just right at 1.5x

Interesting perspectives. Nietzsche was quite the master of rhetoric. This is a collection of 3 essays, the second in a trilogy.

He commences with an essay contrasting 'good' and 'evil' relative to 'good'. In the second, his focus is on how The concept of 'guilt' weaseled its way into usage by way of herd morality through the conduit of religion. Finally, he differentiates 'ascetic' across three actors.

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  • Julius
  • 19-02-2017

Great book, well read

It's a great book and the reader makes it easy to follow, emphasising appropriate words and phrases.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 21-01-2016

Good narration.

There are many narrations of Nietzsche, some of which are terrible. This guy definitely is much, much better.

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  • Wayne
  • 24-06-2013

Be strong, not weak.

On as many levels as possible, this towering philosopher for the ages, tormented soul and liberated intellectual, has set the bar bar for courage and value, leaving most United States Marines in the dust.

He established the spiritual, intellectual and physical norm for "weakness leaving the body."

If you look at his intensity as a war for the individual against false authority (master) and against false submissiveness (slave) you can then understand how his battle is to establish true value in life, as opposed to false submissiveness or brute authoritarianism. Enjoy.

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  • S. Lee
  • 08-01-2019

narrator sounds histrionic at first, but

I have purchased a number of Nietzsche's texts, including this one, all of which sounded extremely histrionic in the beginning. I kept wondering, why is this necessary? What in Nietzsche calls for this? Why not calm and calmly considered tone? I cant't bear this. ENOUGH! ENOUGH!

But then they started to grow on me and now I'm enjoying listening to them. This title, I listened to while reading Walter Kaufmann's translation. There are many places where translation in this audio version adds to Kafumann's in terms of clarity and subtlety. This alone was quite rewarding. There are a few places where the narrator obviously makes mistakes, like when Nietzsche contrasts physiologist with psychologist but the narrator reads both as physiologist. Or when, he pronounces the German name "Eugen" (in Eugen Dühring) as "Eugene" (as in Eugene O'Neill). I giggled a little here. Eugene as a name sounds so sincere and eager while Eugen sounds dull and square.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 05-06-2018

A window into the past

Event though Nietzche offers a look into a more controversial thinking, his thoughts are antiquated and his argument often onesided.

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  • Brett Tyler
  • 03-02-2017

A bit dense for listening

While the ideas presented are profound and interesting, Nietzsche as a listen is difficult to understand. This work to better suited as a read where it can be studied to glean the deeper message being delivered. That all said, the narration was superb and this served as a good gateway into Nietzsche's philosophy in a more accessible form.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 20-01-2021

Outstanding

An outstanding classic, well worth spending the time on it. One of Nietzsche best.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 26-11-2020

be ready to have your morality torn apart , GREAT

its a great book not for everyone though, you may feel your very character destroyed

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  • Nze kkuc akabusi
  • 20-04-2019

Should be required reading for maturing adults

Not for the feint hearted but this philosopher smashes into the fundamental origins of our sacred truths and morals with the same hammer wielded in Twilight of the idols. He does not want agreement or appeasements but thinking beings who take responsibility for what they are and who they can become unshackled from 2 millennia of slave mentality! Enjoy 😊

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  • Rory McKinley
  • 03-05-2020

Should be required reading in all schools

This is without a doubt one of Nietzsche's best works. Nowhere else has one of the most fundamental aspects of human experience, morality, been questioned so thoroughly - and as always Nietzsche writes in an impassioned, bold and highly readable style.

Unfortunately, I find Duncan Steen's voice rather bland, and that it often fails to get across the high emotion of Nietzsche's writing. This reading is much better than his reading of The Birth of Tragedy, which was almost unlistenable, but the mind still tends to wander. Additionally, he's not very good at distinguishing the passages in parentheses from the main text, which can leave a listener very confused: I kept having to refer to a physical copy of the text to understand what was being said.

Overall though, definitely worth listening to, as Steen isn't terrible and the text is superb.

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