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Publisher's Summary

How can 160,000 deaths in one day constitute a 'medium-sized operation'? Think beef is killing the world? What about asparagus farms? Or golf? Going vegan might be all the rage, but the fact is the world has an ever-growing, insatiable appetite for meat - especially cheap meat.

Former food critic and chef, now farmer and restaurateur Matthew Evans grapples with the thorny issues around the ways we produce and consume animals. From feedlots and abattoirs to organic farms and animal welfare agencies, he has an intimate, expert understanding of the farming practices that take place in our name. Evans calls for less radicalisation, for greater understanding, and for ethical omnivores to stand up for the welfare of animals and farmers alike. 

Sure to spark intense debate, On Eating Meat is an urgent listen for all vegans, vegetarians and carnivores.

©2019 Matthew Evans (P)2020 W. F. Howes Ltd

Critic Reviews

"Intellectually thrilling - a book that challenges both vegans and carnivores in the battle for a new ethics of eating. This book will leave you surprised, engrossed and sometimes shocked - whatever your food choices." (Richard Glover)

"Compelling, illuminating and often confronting...Matthew Evans brings his unflinching honesty - and a farmer's hands-on experience - to the question of how to be an ethical carnivore." (Hugh Mackay)

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conforting but informative

wasn't sure if this was a book for me,after 30 years of being a vegetarian. I was moved by many of the content and feel that I have gained a real insight into the ethical omnivore. I still don't want to eat meat but as I do eat eggs and dairy, I feel more empowered to make better more ethical choices in the future, for the benefit of the animals,farmers and processors involved.

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Loved it

Stark reminder of what we put on our plate everyday. I have read similar style books, easy to listen to. Good thought provoking topics

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Everyone should read this

Whether you eat meat, or you don’t, this is an important book. Well balanced and impartial

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  • Anonymous User
  • 29-06-2021

Whatbare is suffering? What is cruelty?

Problematic approach to the concepts of suffering and cruelty. In this work, suffering is framed around death, whereas I would argue that, particularly in the analysis of animal agriculture, suffering must be centred upon quality of life. Moreover, one must question whether animals other than humans are actually capable of cruelty if they act out their inherent and instinctual behaviours... Overall, this work largely reads as a personal defence of, and justification for, the author's own farming practices, which are indeed far more conscientious and compassionate than factory farming norms. However, ultimately, the overwhelming majority of meat consumed around the world comes from large-scale, commercial farms that view animals as commodities rather than sentient beings. Thus, the arguments put forward in favour of meat do are not relevant to today's world.

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