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Publisher's Summary

This program is read by the author. 

Kristi Coulter inspired and incensed the Internet when she wrote about what happened when she stopped drinking. Nothing Good Can Come from This is her debut audiobook - a frank, funny, and feminist essay collection by a keen-eyed observer no longer numbed into complacency.

When Kristi stopped drinking, she started noticing things. Like when you give up a debilitating habit, it leaves a space, one that can’t easily be filled by mocktails or ice cream or sex or crafting. And when you cancel Rosé Season for yourself, you’re left with just summer, and that’s when you notice that the women around you are tanked - that alcohol is the oil in the motors that keeps them purring when they could be making other kinds of noise.

In her sharp, incisive debut essay collection, Coulter reveals a portrait of a life in transition. By turns hilarious and heartrending, Nothing Good Can Come from This introduces a fierce new voice to fans of Sloane Crosley, David Sedaris, and Cheryl Strayed - perfect for anyone who has ever stood in the middle of a so-called perfect life and looked for an escape hatch.

©2018 Kristi Coulter (P)2018 Macmillan Audio

Critic Reviews

"Kristi Coulter charts the raw, unvarnished, and quietly riveting terrain of new sobriety with wit and warmth. Nothing Good Can Come from This is a book about generative discomfort, surprising sources of beauty, and the odd, often hilarious, business of being human." (Leslie Jamison, author of The Empathy Exams and The Recovering)

"Brave, whip-smart, and laugh-out-loud funny.... Although this is framed as a book about drinking, it’s ultimately about so much more: the insidious reasons why so many of us might polish off an entire bottle of Chardonnay in the first place - and how we might better serve ourselves in the end. Coulter herself is addictive to read. She’s a fresh, uncensored voice, offering up more than a drop of insight and hope." (New York Times best-selling author Susan Jane Gilman)

"What’s the opposite of disappointment? Oh right, pure joy.That’s what I felt reading Nothing Good Can Come from This. I was dazzled by Kristi Coulter’s honesty, her humor, and above all her beautiful, perfectly tuned sentences. Rarely do formal invention and real emotion coexist so comfortably; in other words, both intelligence and heart are on full display here. It’s difficult to imagine a more, well, joyous reading experience." (Claire Dederer, author of Love and Trouble)

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  • sam
  • 28-02-2020

sort of ok

guys if you're newly sober this book isnt really about alcohol. it's a rambling biography, sometimes funny. often unnecessarily crude, as if it's trying to find new edgy territory. there is none.

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Odd

This book had some weird segways. And the author kept saying “you” when she was actually talking about herself. I found it weird The author said she was diagnosed as a genius. Maybe my intellect is just too low for this book. Either way I couldn’t finish it as it was just simply oddly written

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Spectacular

I just effing loved this. All the more special to hear it in Kristi’s voice.

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  • Alfredo Maranca
  • 01-10-2018

Light and fun as a sitcom and profound as an exist

By the title, this book may seem just another self-help book about alcohol addiction. It’s much more than this. Actually, it's about existentialism and the reasons one wants to escape the pain of being. Beautifully written, with an unvulgar sense of esthetics and high standards of a profound literature academics, it’s at the same time light, fun and compelling as a sitcom. Many people are afraid from being sober as it seems to adhere to a cliché, throwing off all the revolutionary dreams and sophisticated thoughts for a down to earth day-to-day and a median religiosity. As if this very human, courageous and real woman teaches us how to report our addictions, why one drinks, as a teenager and even more as a successful adult professional. She describes what is to live, love and suffer with the anesthetic aid of alcohol, which helps to choose unwisely and live superficially, and how deep and profound is to live a drama without it, in a beautiful description of an extra conjugal romance where nothing real happens and yet has all the emotional elements of a novella. John, her lovable husband is described with such love and seems to be so sweet and dedicated himself that we almost miss the couple as long as the book ends. We conclude that the decision not to drink is indeed an existential decision, a daily decision to live, fully and deeply, all emotions life puts in our plate.

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  • Olivia Carrow
  • 18-03-2019

another already wealthy woman gets sober

ok, so the "successful, beloved white woman getting sober" trope strikes again. im really happy when anyone gets sober and Kristi Coulter has some great analysis, as well as wonderful experience, strength and hope to share with the rest of us but...save it for AA sister. I cannot read or listen to any more books or articles about wealthy white women with supportive husbands, $2000 handbags, and great careers decide they've had enough of drinking. her drinking was serious; it was constant, and it made her sad. did she lose any teeth, or kids, or jobs, or houses, or friends over it? nope. she's a great example of "raising the bottom" of career drunkenness so that sobriety is more attainable for people who are grey area drinkers, who have lost absolutely nothing, and have enough privilege, money and education to insulate themselves from any consequences; wonderful. But by the end of the book i felt as though i'd been tricked into reading about how rich people live, and how young "bohemian" people who like punk music turn into hedonistic capitalist brats, how self-centeredness can persist through addiction and recovery with enough money. she probably mentioned how much money and luxury she enjoyed in every chapter. the bit at the end about the unfashionable WASPy fiction she enjoys tipped it over the edge; i signed off. the best part about this book is the gratitude I feel that I have never had to suffer the wealthy, and likely never will as a career social worker.

7 people found this helpful

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  • Lee Ward
  • 02-01-2019

cannot finish it!

After 4 chapters of whining about the booze culture, I skipped to chapter 9. More whining, or observing, unfinished projects in closet. yoga classes, diversions and distactions. Boring. Sorry. I was looking, I guess, for some laughter. I have my own closet of unfinished projects.

5 people found this helpful

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  • frankzero
  • 29-12-2018

Honest, relatable, funny

Kristi Coulter’s writing makes you feel like you are hanging out with an old college friend. It’s honest and downright frank at times, which was awesome. She talks about living sober, but also weaves that story line into all sorts of stories that give you a picture of a whole person, not just her one who has decided to stop drinking. I hope she continues to write in this essayist style. She’s got a knack.

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  • Megan C.
  • 25-10-2018

A Tale of Sobriety And Gender Politics

Enjoyed the introductory chapter, her honest reveal about how she felt in terms of her career and treatment. I was able to relate to many aspects in terms of relations and being a woman in corporate America (gender) politics. There were points though where I felt the book started to become scattered in terms of timeline/events and, at times, was hard to follow. But still worth the read. #sobriety #biography #womanhood #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

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  • Maribeth B.
  • 24-04-2019

pretty good read until her political rant..

guess she forgot about Hilary "standing by her man" and that whole Monica thing...but that was probably Monica's fault. i liked this book but didn't find the political crap relevant to the intended subject.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 10-08-2018

Okay in beginning

loved the beginning, but was confused about the last half of the book. it repeated a lot and wasn't really about drinking at all. more about her sex life and work. it just wasn't for me

4 people found this helpful

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  • Katherine Buck
  • 06-03-2020

Love this

I am so glad I read this book and would recommend especially for a women’s book club!

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  • Jay Sueno
  • 20-11-2019

A great friend of a book

I first read this book when I was sober curious. Now 45 days into sobriety I needed a friend to listen to and share a moment with. Kristi’s blunt humor and seattle sarcasm hit the spot. I feel like I can relate so much with her. I love this book and its essay format. You can randomly choose a chapter and just let the worry, anxiety, boredom, or excitement of sober life go and simply listen.

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  • Shrimp Ramen
  • 23-07-2019

1/3 or Less Focused on Drinking/Not Drinking

Essay memoirs are my fave and easiest way to devour an audiobook so this was happily consumed in a single day. If there was an overarching theme I think it would be that ordinary people encounter and overcome extraordinary circumstances all the time in their own timeframes and personalized ways. I don't think the other essays quite lived up to Enjoli fame, yet there well rounded content with above average quality. Coulter doesn't have a commanding voice nor much range; however, there's an inherent charm in hearing the author's authentic voice.

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  • Patrick McMahon
  • 08-05-2020

Outstanding

One of the best sober reads ever. Clever, witty, truthful and utterly devoid of self pity. Highly recommend

1 person found this helpful

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  • d
  • 31-08-2018

Absolutely fantastic

Brilliant, a book I’ll listen to again! The essay style is great because you get lots of little stories intertwined.

3 people found this helpful

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  • MVG
  • 23-09-2020

No structure

I bought this despite reviews saying it lacked structure and I have to agree. Felt like she kept circling around to the same things like the film Groundhog Day. Would have preferred chapters divided into themes like - Childhood in Florida; Working for Amazon; Running; Business trips abroad; Marriage.....

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  • Lesley J
  • 05-09-2020

A great listen!

Really enjoyed listening to this book. Wasn't sure about the accent at first but as it is authentic and the author's, I quickly got over that. Makes you feel privileged to have a peek inside someone else's struggle to become sober. Very real and very interesting.

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  • Darach
  • 25-04-2019

Depressed woman plays victim - Rank

This awful woman has a terrible extreme left wing ideology. She plays the victim. She is anti men. She wonders why she is depressed and drinks. I'm gutted I bought this book.

1 person found this helpful

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