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Publisher's Summary

1977, Collingwood. Two young women are brutally murdered. The killer has never been found. What happened in the house on Easey Street?

On a warm night in January, Suzanne Armstrong and Susan Bartlett were savagely murdered in their house on Easey Street, Collingwood - stabbed multiple times while Suzanne’s 16-month-old baby slept in his cot. Although police established a list of more than 100 ‘persons of interest’, the case became one of the most infamous unsolved crimes in Melbourne.

Journalist Helen Thomas was a cub reporter at The Age when the murders were committed and saw how deeply they affected the city. Now, 42 years on, she has reexamined the cold case - chasing down new leads and talking to members of the Armstrong and Bartlett families, the women’s neighbours on Easey Street, detectives and journalists. What emerges is a portrait of a crime rife with ambiguities and contradictions, which took place at a fascinating time in the city’s history - when the countercultural bohemia of Helen Garner’s Monkey Grip brushed up against the grit of the underworld in one of Melbourne’s most notorious suburbs.

Why has the Easey Street murderer never been found, despite the million-dollar reward for information leading to an arrest? Did the women know their killer, or were their deaths due to a random, frenzied attack? Could the murderer have killed again? This gripping account addresses these questions and more as it sheds new light on one of Australia’s most disturbing and compelling criminal mysteries.

©2019 Helen Thomas (P)2019 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

What listeners say about Murder on Easey Street

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  • Overall
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Human and heartfelt

Suzanne and Susan were never forgotten. Collingwood and Melbourne will never be the same. Throughts with Greg and the families, teacher mates and neighbours. Especially dear Gladys.

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Great read!

This is a fascinatinating book, especially if you know Melbourne. I could not put it down.

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Top read /listen

I felt like I was a fly on the wall detective trying to solve this horrific case . A well written book .

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Ripper book!

loved that the author read the book. super interesting and informative. really made me feel so deeply for the two slain women & their families.

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Quite an incredible story with no end in sight

The historical aspects and facts surrounding this story are fascinating however one is frustrated throughout this book knowing that the details are largely speculative and outcomes virtually are non existent. Having said that, it is clear Helen researched as well as she could despite what appeared to be many roadblocks in her way. With the help of the Police on this book (which was largely not forthcoming), some of the gaps might have been filled or at least better understood.

In the spirit of reconciliation, Audible Australia acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples today.