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Publisher's Summary

A touch of computer keys, a blast of heat, and suddenly the Murry twins, Sandy and Dennys, are gasping in a shimmering desert land. If only the brothers had normal parents, not a scientist mother and a father who experiments with space and time travel. If only the Murry twins had noticed the note on the door of their mother's lab: Experiment in Progress. Please Keep Out

But it's too late for regrets. There's a strange - and very small - person approaching, with a miniature mammoth in tow....

At last it's Sandy and Dennys's turn for an adventure - an adventure that turns serious when they discover that many waters are coming to flood the desert. The twins must find a way back home soon, or they will drown. But how will they get back to their own time? Can they?

©2007 Madeleine L'Engle (P)2007 Listening Library

What listeners say about Many Waters

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  • Mhlia
  • 26-04-2012

Loved the book, not the narrator

I love this series from Madeleine L'Engle and I've read Many Waters a number of times. In listening to it, I found that it is a better book read than heard. I'm not sure if that came from the narration or if the book really was more simplistically written than Wrinkle In Time series featuring Meg and Charles Wallace.

I have listened to the other older books in this series and found them to be as good as I remember the written novels. The narrator was wonderful with different voices for different characters and really drawing me into the book. I found the narrator for this book to be very hard to listen to. Her words were overly enunciated to the point of being distracting and there was very little nuance in her voice or how she spoke the characters or situations. It was clear to me that she was "reading a book" rather than "telling a story" which tends (for me) to be the best part of the audio book. I would actually go out of my way not to listen to a book with this narrator.

That being said, I love this story and was overall disappointed in the performance.

16 people found this helpful

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  • tracie
  • 24-06-2013

Love! Mildly suggestive material.

I read this series, as a child, and this was my favorite book of the series.
It's so fascinating, to bring to life the story of Noah and the flood, and combine it with science fiction.
Having said that, I would like to warn parents about a couple of "iffy" parts, that were mildly uncomfortable or suggestive. First, it talks about the girls being topless, and having "small, rosy breasts, which she covered". My boys were a bit embarrassed. It was handled as tastefully as possible, but...
Next, there is some seduction, and also a part where it says that the main character "...knew what he wanted, what his body wanted, and that he was ready for it. But not with this girl....but with the other one..." This is while a girl is trying to seduce him.
I am really picky, with my kids, and these parts, I would have preferred weren't there...but they did pass so quickly, that I am not sure that my kids really noticed. (My oldest is 12 1/2.)
I just think it's fair to warn parents.

41 people found this helpful

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  • Ms.A
  • 26-02-2018

Should have been book #3 instead of book #4

Great book however completely different than the others. This book should have been book 3 instead of book 4 because the timing is a little out of sort. This book is before Meg goes to college and the 3rd is after college. So that's my only criticism here other than that the book was great, a different voice reading tho. It was nice to hear about the twins in this book but definitely a different twist then the others. Still a good read however doesn't keep you as interested as the other books do.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Alina Negomireanu
  • 04-02-2018

Crazy book

I don't like the narrator her voice is so weird , there's no difference in her voice but the book is good.

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  • HopSez
  • 20-06-2015

Love and Pain...and Delight

I thoroughly enjoy exploring possible scenarios for historical eras we know little about. Madeleine L'Engle adds her considerable creativity to the archaeological mix and a powerful story emerges. The power is in the heart-pain we suffer for people we love dearly but are seemingly unable to "save" from what ever catastrophic danger they are facing. The author delves into the strengths and weaknesses of the human heart, painting vivid portraits of the basic temptations we all encounter and following the characters' varied responses to the ultimate consequences, for better and for worse.

Plus, who doesn't love a story that includes unicorns, mammoths, and pelicans? The unicorns and pelicans are recurring theme's in L'Engle's work, but mammoths? You'll have to read the book to learn about those cute loveable furry creatures; yes, that's how the author draws them. Really. It's a delight to read



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  • MT
  • 22-08-2021

why continue listening to this series

the previous novel, "A Swiftly Tilting Planet", I found melodramatic and disjointed, and it contained a surprising amount of racism? (the 'noble savage' trope, creating an ~ideal beauty by writing a bunch of american indians with blue eyes, and polishing it off with some nice banal stereotypes about the irish--too questionable for my taste)

This novel works better as a story; the pacing is much improved, but even to someone who's studied the bible and is at least aware of the beliefs one must foster to support a literalist interpretation, some of the foundational ideas in this story are really wild. If the biblical patriarchs were said to live 700+ years, that doesn't make it a typical lifespan, nor does longevity necessarily imply protracted developmental stages (and if some lives were preternaturally long, well, early civilisations had a shortage of good leaders). Also, the 'ark' is not a boat, it's just a box -- it does not require any navigational ability since God saw to its safety and ordained its landing place. Another example, the 'ancestral language' is one thing, but to assume someone who has never spoken it can know it by instinct is to imply that language is inborn, and then forgotten, perhaps due to sin, and then overwritten by the languages of Babel --which in the story has the odd effect of sanctifying these so-called normal characters (who are a long time in recognising they've hopped the old tesseract into Genesis, into one of the most famous biblical stories). It's doubly-funny because L'Engle already developed the concept of kything which does not require language. How indulgent, to dwell on this blessed family that suffers only heroic and cosmic trials, but this book firmly implies that there's something in the Murray water and they really are better than the other sad mortals trudging about. What is Job's story, then?

One final complaint: she calls on an (arguably harmful) female trope to render a certain character and then calls her a sl**. I thought this book was intended for either children or young adults, but that's really shocking to hear full stop. I don't think I've ever read that word in any serious literature.

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  • Joshua Crain
  • 01-02-2021

Probably L'Engle's weakest in the Time series.

It was alright. but not very good. enjoyable, but I could have lived without it.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 23-11-2020

A Nice Surprise

I wasn't familiar with the store. I thoroughly enjoyed it. A good read, a comfort during these crazy times.

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  • mum4munchkins
  • 07-06-2020

Good writing never gets old

Excellent voicing. Poignant well thought visualizations of pre-Deluge Earth. Profound exploration of genuine love.

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  • Mama Gaia
  • 01-02-2020

interesting but not her best

I enjoyed it but I found it lacked the philosophical depth of the first two books in this series, which I absolutely loved. also a warning to parents: this book has a lot of sexual innuendo

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