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I Hear the Sirens in the Street

Detective Sean Duffy, Book 2
Narrated by: Gerard Doyle
Series: Detective Sean Duffy Series, Book 2
Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (40 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

A torso in a suitcase looks like an impossible case, but Sean Duffy isn’t easily deterred, especially when his floundering love life leaves him in need of a distraction. So with detective constables McCrabban and McBride, he goes to work identifying the victim.

The torso turns out to be all that’s left of an American tourist who once served in the U.S. military. What was he doing in Northern Ireland in the midst of the 1982 Troubles? The trail leads to the doorstep of a beautiful, flame-haired, twentysomething widow, whose husband died at the hands of an IRA assassination team just a few months before. Suddenly Duffy is caught between his romantic instincts, gross professional misconduct, and powerful men he should know better than to mess with. These include British intelligence, the FBI, and local paramilitary death squads - enough to keep even the savviest detective busy. Duffy’s growing senseof self-doubt isn’t helping. But as a legendarily stubborn man, he doesn’t let that stop him from pursuing the case to its explosive conclusion.

©2013 Adrian McKinty (P)2013 Blackstone Audio

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    4 out of 5 stars
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this is an excellent audio book and a great yarn

The whole story is brilliantly set against the back drop of the Northern Island Troubles, there are large helpings of Irish humour and a great collection of understated determined characters to help bring the story to life, hats off to the author and hats of to the narrator

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Ted
  • 31-08-2013

Hear "Cold Ground" First, Then Audlble This!

Sean Duffy’s back in both the 80s and in Belfast… A double dosing of intriguing melancholia. Please…. Please…. Please listen first to “The Cold Cold Ground”, Adrian McKinty’s introduction to Sean Duffy’s police work in the heart of the Irish “Troubles”. It’s important to avoid spoilers for that introductory book you’ll surely want to visit after you’ve finished this one.

But more importantly, Sean Duffy is bending in the fury of the cultural maelstrom raging about him. And the way the nature of all of this is shaping his development is deeply moving. Duffy of “Sirens in the Streets” is not the young man who we first met in “Cold Cold Ground”. This isn’t as much a series as it is an epic psychological evolution cut into sort of stand-alone hunks with “I Hear Sirens” as the second.

The sense of place in time hot-welds you inside of Ulster and its non-normal normalcy. Apparently McKinty means to write a trilogy but the detective puzzle this time is powerfully different from the fist and the ensemble cast adds and loses characters with the frequency of Ireland’s emigration rates.

Gerard Doyle’s mouth is filled with Irish and he speaks the story through a lilt that’s got to make this a finer experience than you’d hope for from the printed page. I’ll be among the first to buy the next installment in this Sean Duffy series.

36 of 39 people found this review helpful

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  • L. O. Pardue
  • 27-08-2014

Pitch Perfect Voice and Words

The narrator's voice with a beautiful Irish lilt is perfectly matched to the words that are so well-written by McKinty. I want to compare the writing to soaring poetry, but I lack the skills to define how much this story -- this series -- moves me to listen so intently. I actually listened to some chapters a second time, not because I didn't understand, but because I wanted to hear it again. I am already looking forward to the day that I can re-listen to this series.

Don't even think of starting this book unless you have heard the first in the series "A Cold, Cold Ground". The background and place (1980's in Northern Ireland) have taught me a great deal about the "Troubles" near Ulster. It is fortunate that the first book is just as excellent as the second.

Sean Duffy is my hero. No need to explain, it will be readily apparent as you read this story, even though no one would claim Duffy is perfect. I can't wait to read the next book in the series. I hope Adrian McKinty will not plan to take a break from writing now that he has completed this trilogy. I would read anything he puts out in the future.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

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  • Dave
  • 03-02-2014

Utterly brilliant

I love Adrian's Sean Duffy. What a story about the Troubles of Northern Ireland and specifically the fascinating tale of John DeLorean's car manufacturing plant just outside of Belfast. Although the story takes place during the dark days of Northern Ireland,it abounds with tales of love and heartbreak as well as a good dose of Irish humor..
The book starts with a torso in a suitcase and from there it takes Duffy and his police mates McCrabbon (Crabby) and McBride on a hunt that leads them to an end no one, including the reader, expects.
I can't wait for Book3. This is McKinty at his best.

13 of 15 people found this review helpful

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  • Marc
  • 16-05-2013

It doesn't get much better than this

Would you consider the audio edition of I Hear the Sirens in the Street to be better than the print version?

There's no doubt.

Gerard Doyle's reading takes you straight into Ireland, engulfs you and doesn't let go. McKinty seriously knows how to paint an environment even with the sparse language he uses but Doyle interprets his writing in a way that elevates it well beyond the words.

If there's a better writer/reader combination on Audible I have yet to find it.

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

On the edge. That is a such dumb question.

This is not one of those Shots fired, dumb joke, flat remark, shots fired type of books. There is an interesting main plot, yes, but many others things are happening and if you weren't present during the "troubles" in Northern Ireland during that time (I certainly wasn't) this is your chance of getting a hint of what it could have felt like.

Which character – as performed by Gerard Doyle – was your favorite?

Someone desperately needs to edit these questions.

I liked the milk man a lot.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, but I mainly listen during commuting and so my daily listening time is limited. That's why I augmented by reading the print (ebook) version.

Any additional comments?

I you haven't come across Adrian McKinty before and can deal with tough violence go and read the Michael Forsythe trilogy (starts with "Dead I Well May Be"). Gerard Doyle reads these as well. It's unfortunate that McKinty is struggling to sell his books but this may relate to the fact that he doesn't follow the shoot-smug remark-shoot formula.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

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  • Chip Atkinson
  • 25-03-2014

Great mystery, Great Trilogy

This is a gritty series about a time when there was no good side of things. I love the fact that the hero, Sean Duffy, is Catholic working for the police. The conflicts this creates are as complicated and volatile as Belfast was in the troubles.

It's great police work mired in political intrigue. John DeLorian plays a central role in this one. I actually met him in 1984 or 5 after his fall. He was a broken man, but a good man.

The story flows and is fast moving. I'll never miss a McKinty novel and neither should you!

12 of 16 people found this review helpful

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  • J. Green
  • 20-06-2013

So entertaining

Adrian McKinty is one terrific writer. He.creates memorable characters, interesting mysteries and witty dialogue. I really love this series since I knew nothing about the Troubles prior to reading The Cold Cold Ground. It is bit of a history lesson wrapped up in a great story.

9 of 12 people found this review helpful

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  • BoolySpark
  • 29-05-2018

Mckinty wanders about!

Too long, too much of Belfast unrest, unlikely scenarios. not his best efforts. Depressing story that need not be.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Barbara
  • 05-05-2017

Could do without so many f bombs

Great historical detective novel. Had some the American culture references wrong, but easy to understand considering the author perhaps didn't have a American editor.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • David
  • 13-01-2017

More Totally 80s! Ireland

The second book in “The Troubles” series. one of the wave of “Belfast Noir” series I became interested in after reading Stuart Neville.

While Neville’s stories are set in modern Ireland, Adrian McKinty is writing about Northern Ireland in the 80s, at the height of sectarian violence. In this second book about Detective-Inspector Sean Duffy, an Irish-Catholic who’s joined the police (and thus become an enemy of pretty much everyone), McKinty inserts a murder mystery into as many 80s pop culture references as he can shove into a book about Northern Ireland. Duffy is a music and movie aficionado so we can be frequently reminded of what bands were “cool” in the 80s, but the big time capsule here is Back to the Future (the movie is actually name-checked in the book) and the Delorean Motor Company.

Delorean really did set up a manufacturing facility for its cars in Northern Ireland in the 80s. It was meant to provide jobs and economic stability to the region, giving the British government hope for a means of quelling the violence. Unfortunately, it all fell apart a few years later, with John Delorean charged with conspiracy to traffic drugs.

In I Hear The Sirens in the Street, DI Duffy is thrust right into this historical plot, when the chopped-up body of a retired American tourist is found and somehow becomes connected to the Delorean facility. This gives Duffy an excuse to meet John Delorean himself and become peripherally involved in the FBI’s sting operation. Of course in this fictional version of events, everyone on both the American and the British side is corrupt and in cahoots, Duffy gets caught in the middle trying to actually solve a crime, and he ends the book being thoroughly screwed over, as honest men always are in books like this.

In the background of all this are also references to the Falklands War, which was also an event at the time but even more unrelated to a police inspector in Northern Ireland.

I like McKinty’s writing well enough, but rather than developing his characters (in this book, Duffy flirts with/screws several women, and there’s no hint of the bisexuality that randomly popped up in the first book, and otherwise just bangs his head against walls and muses about music and poetry like in the last book), he mostly seems to like writing books about Totally 80s! Ireland.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Traci
  • 12-10-2016

Love/Hate

Would you listen to I Hear the Sirens in the Street again? Why?

Yes. I liked it.

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

No. I guessed who did it pretty early on but I was invested in the journey.

What about Gerard Doyle’s performance did you like?

His performance was so good..... I am not sure if the book is actually is on par with the narration. No matter the case, he made the story better.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No.

Any additional comments?

Loved the book hated the ending. Too manipulative.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • John
  • 27-04-2014

Another great yarn

These are a series of stories set during the troubles but not about them - thank God! The narrator has a very dodgy "Nornirish" accent - more Dublin than Belfast (perhaps Jimmy Nesbitt for the next series?) but despite that, this is a great story which evokes memories of Belfast and especially Carrickfergus 30 odd years ago. The author has researched the book well and many of the characters remind me of some "peelers" of the time. I thoroughly enjoyed the first and look forward to listening to the rest of the series.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • MISS E J BIRD
  • 19-05-2019

Just brilliant again!

Beautifully describes the northern Ireland of my childhood - bleak but with great humour. Great writing, fantastic narration.

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  • princess85
  • 08-03-2019

Another good Duffy mystery

these are compelling and complex ctime stotirs with an equally complex backdrop. I have learnt a lot about the Irish troubles from them

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  • Malks
  • 25-12-2018

suberb

a top class book and equally good narration. onto the next one of the series

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  • Paul D
  • 13-11-2018

Yup, enjoyed this one

I enjoy UK regional crime dramas but this is my first visit to Ireland, it will not be my last. I have already begun looking for more offerings from Mr McKinty who has several books in this series. I hope the standard is maintained.
Interesting well draw characters involved in a realistic storyline. Add a touch of irish humour and an interesting music connection to a great narration and you have a very good listen.