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Publisher's Summary

"People of color have endured traumatic histories and almost daily assaults on our dignity. We have prayed about racism, been in denial, or acted out in anger, but we have not known how to individually or collectively pursue healing from the racial trauma." 

As a child, Sheila Wise Rowe was bused across town to a majority white school, and she experienced the racist lie that one group is superior to all others. We experience ongoing racial trauma as this lie is perpetuated by the action or inaction of the government, media, viral videos, churches, and within families of origin. In contrast, scripture declares that we are all fearfully and wonderfully made. 

Professional counselor Rowe exposes the symptoms of racial trauma to lead listeners to a place of freedom from the past and new life for the future. In each chapter, she includes an interview with a person of color to explore how we experience and resolve racial trauma. With Rowe as a reliable guide who has both been on the journey and shown others the way forward, you will find a safe pathway to resilience.

©2019 Sheila Wise Rowe (P)2020 eChristian

What listeners say about Healing Racial Trauma

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  • michael
  • 30-05-2020

Awfull!!!!

I am a counselor in social work, and as a social worker I work with people of color with current trauma based on historical trauma. What I got was maybe two chapters on trauma, and eight chapters on the Bible, chapter and verse. If I wanted a book on scripture, I would've bought one. I painfully finished the the book only because I paid for it. With all due respect I didn't buy the book to hear what Jesus said or what God said to Moses. Rather, I wanted to learn more about historical racial trauma and its effects on today's people of color. I found it an incredible waste of time.

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  • Takisha
  • 18-11-2020

A book that teaches, inspires, and indeed, heals

Sheila Wise Rowe has written a beautiful, insightful book that helps people of color identify racial trauma through true and relatable stories of others. It also provides opportunities for reflection and application all grounded in scripture. Well-worth the read.

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  • Deana Taylor
  • 12-10-2020

So Blessed By This!

I purchased the ebook several months ago but soon learned that my learning style and stamina have changed. I will be attending a workshop this evening which required that I complete the book prior to starting the class. I was concerned but thought, "Let me try the audio book." I am so thankful that I did! This is my first experience in audio books. I am glad that this was the book I chose and I am excited to continue to learn this way. The words are more powerful coming directly from the author and I was able to finish the book and highlight in my ebook as I went along. This was such a blessing and has opened up a new study skill for me. Thank you for such incredible content with such vulnerability and excellent parallels with the word.

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  • Shawnieka Pope
  • 18-08-2020

Inspirational and offers hope and healing

This book offered the beautiful marriage of spirituality, historical context and exploration of the possibility of healing! LOVE THIS!

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  • Adam Shields
  • 05-08-2020

Trauma is real

Summary: Trauma is real; some of that trauma is based on racism or white supremacy; the hard work of healing is essential, not just for individuals but also for communities and future generations. I have recently joined a Be The Bridge group. Part of the method of the group is to acknowledge history and lament that history. I was asked to do a short presentation on lament. Because I had meant to anyway, I started re-reading Soong-Chan Rah's Prophetic Lament. The opening of Prophetic Lament was helpful, but I was seeking out other resources and saw the chapter on Lament in Healing Racial Trauma. After I finished that chapter, a friend commented about how helpful she found the book as a whole and how she was leading a small group through the book. So I decided to move the book up on my list. Part of being slow to pick up Healing Racial Trauma is my identification of racial trauma primarily with racial minorities. Most of the examples of this book are of racial minorities, but that does not mean that this book is not for those with less melanin. The strong theme throughout the book is that healing is not only for yourself (although it is that as well) but also for your community and future generations. Breaking cycles is tremendously hard, but if we want healthy communities, churches, institutions, and families, we have to do the work of breaking cycles. That means that we have to do the hard work of internal healing, which is related to communal healing. The chapters are similar in approach, there are several stories which carry through each section, and the topic is illustrated through actual people. The chapters are Wounds, Fatigue, Silence, Rage, Fear, Lament, Shame, Addiction, Freedom, and Resilience. When my friend recommended the book, she said that she did not think that many White people understood that minority communities often have more pressures than what is perceived from outside. That is best illustrated by this paragraph from the book: "The research of Dr. Sherman James into health disparities among African Americans identified a coping mechanism used to combat ongoing psychosocial and environmental stress, stigma, and racism. Dr. James reported that when people are “‘really trying to make ends meet going up against very powerful forces of dislocation—their biological systems are going to pay a price,’ he said. ‘That’s the situation African Americans have been in since the beginning,’ he added. ‘Now we’re seeing other groups begin to be exposed to these same forces.’”10 Dr. James named the John Henryism Hypotheses after his patient John Henry Martin, who rose from being a sharecropper to become a wealthy farmer with seventy-five acres of land. Like the mythical John Henry of folklore who died of exhaustion after beating a mechanical steam drill, Dr. James’s patient also paid a hefty price for overworking. His patient was afflicted with hypertension, arthritis, and a severe peptic ulcer, and his physical health continued to decline. Dr. James developed the John Henry scale to identify those who have physically suffered as a result of their constant striving." Part of the importance of lament is rightly recognizing reality. If we do not acknowledge rightly, we cannot lament, and that lack of lament perpetuates the problems through our silence. As the book says, "Elie Wiesel says, “We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” The adage, 'hurt people, hurt people' is true. Children and youth that are exposed to violence or are direct victims of violence are more likely to have 'increased depression, substance abuse, risky sexual behavior, homelessness, and poor school performance." But estimates are that only 2-15% of any age receive victim assistance, and that percentage tends to be lower among Black victims. I don't want to talk too strongly about trauma only around violence, but that is an area where I think it is possible to see injury without as much controversy. Personally, the big takeaway for me is that lament and acknowledgment is not just important to recognize that problems or disparities exist, but that they are a step toward action and healing, or as Sheila Rowe says, "Activism is often a byproduct of lament."

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  • KMcB
  • 03-08-2020

Excellent

This book offered insight and paradigm about the psycho-spiritual effects of racism that I haven’t read anywhere else. Really helpful for practical ministry and caring for souls.

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  • K.B.S
  • 03-07-2020

Don't listen to the bad review.

That person must have missed the Christian Audio running along the side of the book cover. If you want a real, passionate, and insightful look at the trauma of racism, this is your book. If you don't want a christian perspective, pick another.

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