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Girls on the Edge

Four Factors Driving the New Crisis for Girls
Narrated by: Pam Ward
Length: 8 hrs and 26 mins
4 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Psychologist and physician Leonard Sax’s work with young people reveals that girls today have an incredibly brittle sense of self. Though they may look confident on the outside, teens and tweens are fragile inside, obsessed with grades, sports, networking sites, and appearances. They are confused about their sexual identity, as environmental toxins are accelerating physical maturity faster than their emotional maturity.

Now, Sax gives us the tools we need to help girls become independent and confident women. He provides parents with practical tips on everything from helping their daughters to make decisions to nurturing their spirits through female-centered activities to getting them involved in communities of female role models - which give young women pride and allow them to grow in a safe environment that nurtures curiosity and confidence.

©2010 Leonard Sax (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Critic Reviews

“A MUST read.” (Margaret M. Ferrara, Ph.D., associate professor, University of Nevada, Reno)

What members say

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Dan
  • Dan
  • 26-03-2011

Great Book - Needs A Better Narrator

Well written, just like Why Gender Matters and Boys Adrift. Highly recommended reading for anyone with a daughter. However, the narrator was painful to listen to. I felt as if I was being lectured by school principal at times. Several times I actually had to turn this audio book off as her voice was like nails on a chalk board.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • Jo Farabee
  • 16-06-2015

Fantastic information !

Having five children two of which are girls a 16-year-old and 11-year-old this book was spot on.it gave me information to look at Innoway I had never thought too… Which sometimes seems like how could I have not?I feel that should be required reading for any parent who has a girl when she turns seven!!!sometimes the chapters were so intense you had to take a break for a day just to think it all through.I thoroughly enjoyed boys adrift written by the same author and I would add this in that same category five star

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • yu shao
  • 05-06-2015

a disappointment

What disappointed you about Girls on the Edge?

It is not nearly as good as the book: boys on the edge. This book has little scientific research data for backup. too many subjective theories. not very convincing.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Roy
  • 01-12-2010

For Parents and Policy Makers

Leonard Sax's "Girls on the Edge" is a follow-up to his book "Boys Adrift." Both are informative and address troubling factors influencing our youth. Essentially, Sax suggests that young women are being adversely affected by issues of sexual identity, the cyberbubble, obsessions, and environmental toxins. For me the chapter on the cyberbubble was the weakest and the section on environmental toxins the most informative. His discussion of puberty and age along with eating disorders were very enlightening. Positively, Sax reports the research and literature in a straightforward manner. Negatively, he makes no real suggestions concerning how parents can remedy the circumstances revealed. Otherwise, the writing is very good, the information is very approachable, and the narration of Pam Ward excellent.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Dawn Slaybaugh
  • 10-02-2017

Good subject matter but takes awhile to get use to the reader

Overall, I enjoyed the book. After having listened to his other title on parenting, I wanted to explore his body of work. Although the last 3/4 of the book starts to drag, the last chapter brought my interest level back and the book ended well. I am going to listen to Boys Adrift next. I highly recommend this book to all parents and teachers, and anyone else that works with children, especially girls.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • GBBMOA
  • 30-11-2014

Now I get it.

What’s an idea from the book that you will remember?

Women are now told we can do it all, and encouraged to do so.....but doing it all is not easy, and often causes a great deal of overwhelming anxiety. Doing it all, when you're a woman, also can include being the mother you always wanted to be, in addition to being the best at your chosen (choices unlimited) profession. This is not necessarily attainable...

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Chad
  • 23-07-2019

Mixed feelings

Girls on the edge? On the ege of what, exactly?

Four factors driving the new crisis for girls - what new crisis? What are the four factors? I really was unclear until just now as I'm looking at the cover image for the book. Certainly there are a variety of topics in the book, but there's no clear organization defining what the factors are, or how they tie together.

And why would a male author have a female narrator describing what he does and says in the first person? That seemed like an odd take.

This is intended for parents of girls ages 0-18. It sounds like the author took a handful of common lessons he likes to tell parents in his practice, and decided to mash them all together in a book. A sort of parenting checklist, if you will.

It was painful to listen to at first. The author sounds like he is maintaining that these days, girls wear too little clothing, spend too much time online, gossip too much, and so on. He comes close to, but doesn't quite say, "back in my day" or "get off my lawn!"

As the book goes on, some parts get a bit less judgy and cringey, and he brings up some useful information. Somewhat useful. He has a tendency to point out problems, without any clear action steps for the parents or girls involved, except with a had-wavey "she needs to learn who she is". Some of the problems or potential solutions he brings up are backed by at least mentioning scientific studies. Some come out of his own opinion. I'd advise taking what he says with a grain of salt and doing your own research to back it up.

If his information is correct, he does make a number of valid points. You should consider which school sports are more or less likely to result in lifelong injury to your child. Perhaps boys and girls do need to warm up with different exercises, or should have different types of sports, simply because their bodies are structured differently, with different strengths or weaknesses. Teens do need to get to bed on time and get plenty of sleep. I don't know that I'd favor keeping a teen's computer in a public room and installing strict monitoring software on every device they have, or sending girls to only girls-only schools and colleges or so on.

I think this book is worth a lesson for parents of girls, but don't follow it blindly. Use it to introduce new ideas and thoughts, and do your own research and come to your own conclusions on how to handle those parenting challenges.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Olga
  • 23-04-2018

The facts which are good to know

What made the experience of listening to Girls on the Edge the most enjoyable?

The books tells about issues and provide good examples.

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

The books tells about issues and not about solutions which I as a MOTHER OF 2 GIRLS would like to know.

What does Pam Ward bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

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Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

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Any additional comments?

For me it was : Grass is green and sky is blue... I could not find actual problem-solving cases and what to do except just to talk to the doc, which is also hard to find.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • John
  • 03-08-2017

Simple. Dads need to read this!

My daughters are young, 3 and 6. This book equipped me with the tools to successfully navigate the hard teenage years. But the real gold nugget here was that I have to start now!!!!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Amy Starkey
  • 05-05-2016

This should be required reading for parents

I was fascinated by this book. I know it won't magically make the the best parent ever but I also know it'll help give me some tools to communicate and understand my daughters and their needs.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful