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Fight Like a Girl

Narrated by: Clementine Ford
Length: 9 hrs and 30 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (679 ratings)

Non-member price: $29.95

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Publisher's Summary

This new edition includes an extra chapter on the #MeToo Movement and how women are standing up and speaking out and reclaiming control over the stories told about their lives.

'A friend recently told me that the things I write are powerful for her because they have the effect of making her feel angry instead of just empty. I want to do this for all women and young girls - to take the emptiness and numbness they feel about being a girl in this world and turn it into rage and power. I want to teach all of them how to Fight Like A Girl.' (Clementine Ford)

Online sensation, fearless feminist heroine and scourge of trolls and misogynists everywhere, Clementine Ford is a beacon of hope and inspiration to thousands of Australian women and girls. Her incendiary debut Fight Like A Girl is an essential manifesto for feminists new, old and soon-to-be, and exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women. Crucially, it is a call to arms for all women to rediscover the fury that has been suppressed by a society that still considers feminism a threat.

Fight Like A Girl will make you laugh, cry and scream. But above all it will make you demand and fight for a world in which women have real equality and not merely the illusion of it.

©2016 Clementine Ford (P)2016 Audible, Ltd

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Average Customer Ratings

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    5 out of 5 stars
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WOW YES YES YES

This book resonated very strongly with me. Thank you Clementine for being brave enough to write this. This in many many parts has been me. I have been suppressing anger all my life. I no longer feel alone. Thank you. I am sure it will resonate with many others who wonder why they don't fit and why why why the injustice. Everyone should read this book.

14 of 16 people found this review helpful

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Eye-opening

I thought I had a handle on equal rights and could even feel good about my perspective. "Fight Like A Girl" has shown me there is so much more to be done. Listen to this. Challenge yourself and listen to this.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Hard to see through the rhetoric

Dang... what to say about this book? From a male? I felt like I was hiding in costume at a secret meeting, where I became aware I am part of the 'they' that is constantly used to describe the antagonist. I can't remember any book making me think as this one has.

While I know I'm not the core demographic this book appeals to (to put it lightly), I think it's important to have a more balanced view of the world and be exposed to different ways of thinking. Additionally, anything that helps me unpack my place of privilege on the planet and how I can respond to that is always helpful - even if it doesn't seem so at first glance.

I listened to the audio edition of this, read by Ms Ford herself. Without reading it separately I can only hazard a guess, but the performance only added to the intensity of the words on the page; it definitely seemed that her reading was more animated than many other audiobook performances.

Let's start with the things that were positive:

I am completely for anything that encourages people to take more control of their circumstances. Throughout the book, Ford works relentlessly to shake her readers out of simply accepting the status quo and to object when they are offended against. The narrative that encourages the reader 'it's okay to be angry' initially missed the mark for me, but about 3/4 through it was as if a light went on in my head. I stopped viewing anger as misplaced passion or externalising internal problems and noted that it is important to inject energy when creating a swell. This anger can be helpful to bring readers together and lend them shared experiences through Ford's recounting of some of the abhorrent words, actions and people she has been exposed to.

When time is taken to frame an argument, Ford is very adept and persuasive. I appreciated when she used robust data and supporting evidence to bolster a point she was trying to make - one example being the disparity in response to the attacker and victim in the Stanford Rape case. This is one of the times where Ford's narrative was presented so clearly to me. In this instance it felt less about oppression and more about the assumption of society to the role of judge, jury and executioner on every case. It is backed up by local stories of the victims of sexual assault or worse by sports stars, and the rhetoric that the victim 'should have expected it' etc. This is where I feel most ashamed to be male. That men who commit these crimes can ever reason that their actions were valid never ceases to astound me.

Parts I was less enthused about?

It may be Ford's personal rhetoric/style, but her constant use of obscene language moved from jarring to undermining the message rapidly. I've not experienced any media with so much crude content in it before. While a significant amount of this is directly quoted, a lot of it is from the mind of the writer. I promise, none of it was offensive to me, but I would expect someone who works with words for a living to be able to get the message across in a decidedly more creative manner, and like others, my rating lost a star from it.

For this reason, I would go so far as to say that to a person who has yet matured and understands a bit about their world, this book is dangerous. Language knows no gender, and if the words you use undermine your message, those wrong words are what people will take away as the message itself fades into the background. I'm only saying this because I've seen reviews that say the reviewer has given copies to their daughters and friends' daughters - teenagers? Yeah, yeah... while similar insults are used in movies and can be found on YouTube easily, do we really want to tell people that the words you use don't matter? This was a crass book.

I would really have loved some more practical suggestions to both women and men in resolving these issues. Unless I missed some major points, most of the chapters finished with a more generic 'do what you want' or 'don't take that s**t from anyone' sign off. I understand that the book is more of a collation of the major points Ford has been talking about for years, but I could have reverse engineered some behaviour changes from suggestions to women if they weren't all mainly about telling men to 'f**k off'.

Without trying to confer to the overarching narrative of male society in the book, I just wish we could work more as a team. That 100% requires men to stand up and get to work changing mindsets, but I believe it can be done. I will continue to do my best to honour the women around me and work toward the just division of acknowledgement and remuneration for the ways in which they make our planet great. I prefer a more mature tone to my dialogue however, and I was sadly left wanting for more of that in this book. If Ford could work out a more productive vehicle to get the clicks, likes or shares she's going for, I believe her message could be heard and infiltrated by a much larger audience.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

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  • DD
  • 22-08-2018

Aggressive and felt like a constant rant

I was exited at the thought of my first feminist book.
What a disappointment. If the author has some valid points, great stories and examples, the aggressiveness of her opinions put me off.
Furthermore she makes assumptions that all females have experiences he same difficulties as hers, which discredited her in my view. I stopped reading it 75% into it, I just had enough of the rant after rant about people who abuse her on social media.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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Poor narration

The delivery was so poor it made it hard to care about the content (even as a female). It was plain and negative. I couldn't finish it after multiple attempts and in future will stick to reading Ford's works.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Michael Soo
  • KINGSWOOD, New South Wales Australia
  • 13-02-2017

Honest. look at the female experience..

Clem Ford narrates her own book. Passionate and bold. Feminism as it stands today.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Intro to Feminism meets a deadline

Good if you are after an introduction to feminism type book within an Australian and more broadly Western context. Book seems rushed in 2nd half with less structure and more repetition. Too many long sentences and underdeveloped ideas.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Not what I expected

Though unexpected I firmly believe every single person should read this book. it will make you cringe, you will feel uncomfortable, you will feel a twinge of guilt or 2, but you will leave with a clearer and expanded view of the world. 100% recommend this book to anyone brave enough to be self aware enough to take on board it's important messages.

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

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  • Josh
  • Rockhampton, Australia
  • 03-11-2016

Awesome, humbling book

Clementine lays bare her experience of the world as a woman and shares her views with unflinching honesty.
I found my own ideas of what it meant to be a male feminist challenged and that I need to listen more to those who actually know what it's like (women)

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

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Nothing but vitriol

Worst book I have read. Venting of an angry young woman, who saw nothing but hurdles and barriers, and no solutions.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Ashley
  • 23-10-2017

Great reader and view of life

I really enjoyed this book. I never thought of myself as a feminist and realized that my view was because I never really took the time to look up the term - feminism, noun: the advocacy of women's rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes. What woman doesn't want that? If you say 'me', it's because you probably are privileged or protected enough to have not been treated as less than equal. Please don't take that as an insult. I definitely do not intend it to be so. I grew up much like Clementine Ford, in a household which treated each individual with equal love.

The main feeling I had during this book was thankfulness. I am thankful that people like Clementine Ford have the strength and abilities to do the kind of social work needed to fight for the liberation and equality of all. I am also very thankful for the excellent childhood I had full of a family and friends network of people who appreciated me as a person and didn't treat me as less than equal.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Lisa
  • 23-06-2017

inoculation against the status quo

What made the experience of listening to Fight Like a Girl the most enjoyable?

Clementine's raw honesty, humour and determination to hold a space for all of us to get woke

What does Clementine Ford bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Always love narration by the author - then I know I'm getting the whole story

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Are you brave enough? If not, why not?

Where ever you are is ok, but for f***'s sake be thinking about it

Any additional comments?

Thank you and look forward to the next one x

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 24-05-2017

officially inspired!!

The story was very relatable as it went through the different stages of becoming a feminist. She also makes a lot of good points and this is definitely a book that ill recommend to friends!

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • tia
  • 09-10-2016

Phenomenally heartbreaking and rousing!

I recommend this book to all women. This eloquently written book has helped me to to find my voice, when for so long I lacked the ability to fully articulate what I felt and experienced in the world. Thank you for all the other Clementines fighting the endless battle for equality while dealing with the deranged spotlight cast on them for doing so.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 09-10-2018

Genuine, passionate and thought provoking

I won't lie, when this book was suggested to me by my wife I cringed a bit inside. 'I'll just get through it and then I can say I listened and go back to something good' I thought to myself. To say that I was surprised by the book is an understatement. Clementine has poured herself and her not misplaced anger into this book but still managed to keep it funny and not ranting. I'm pretty much in the sweet spot of the privileged white male and, as I suspect is true of many in my situation, I had never seriously thought about the equality of society and had certainly never looked at it through this lens. What was both remarkable and shocking to me was that I have started to see examples of many of the traits and behaviours talked about in this book in day to day life. It has really made me think and think hard about something I would previously have largely dismissed as it wasn't obviously present to me in my day to day life (although I was also wrong about that). Clementine's narration is excellent, passionate, irreverent, funny and not ranty. I am hugely pleased that I listened to this as it has made me really question what I had previously taken for granted. By the end of the book I found myself not, as I had assumed at the start, feeling a sense of relief and diving back into my normal material but rather looking for the audible version of her new book. This is a good book and I would strongly urge other men to listen to it.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Sarah
  • 10-01-2019

Superb!!

A great book giving words to frustrations that have been felt by me virtually my whole life, and I'm guessing by most other women too.