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Publisher's Summary

From intimate relationships to global politics, Sarah Schulman observes a continuum: that inflated accusations of harm are used to avoid accountability. Illuminating the difference between conflict and abuse, Schulman directly addresses our contemporary culture of scapegoating. This deep, brave, and bold work reveals how punishment replaces personal and collective self-criticism, and shows why difference is so often used to justify cruelty and shunning.

Rooting the problem of escalation in negative group relationships, Schulman illuminates the ways cliques, communities, families, and religious, racial, and national groups bond through the refusal to change their self-concept. She illustrates how supremacy behavior and traumatized behavior resemble each other, through a shared inability to tolerate difference.

This important and sure-to-be controversial book illuminates such contemporary and historical issues of personal, racial, and geo-political difference as tools of escalation towards injustice, exclusion, and punishment, whether the objects of dehumanization are other individuals in our families or communities, people with HIV, African Americans, or Palestinians.

©2016 Sarah Schulman (P)2018 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"A concluding call to address personal and social conflicts without state intervention via police and courts caps off a work that's likely to inspire much discussion." (Publishers Weekly, starred review)

What listeners say about Conflict Is Not Abuse

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Controversial examples don’t make sense

I only got half way through this. I found the examples very problematic in relation to power dynamics in workplaces and whether a supervisor or professor should have a relationship with a student. Not just this example though.
There was one Schulman gives of her own account of being attracted to a coworker during a work lunch or dinner and she starts objectifying her.

And there were other examples about consent that were questioning a woman’s believability in relation to sexual assault.

Of course, a minority of women make false claims, I don’t deny that. But as a recent ‘survivor’ of date rape, it is so important that women are believed. I never reported my experience and many of my friends have never reported theirs.

Now that we see all these cases of women, men and non binary people in the army not reporting out of fear for their lives, those few cases that weren’t true shouldn’t be given the attention they do, compared to the constant violence women and others face.

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  • L Win
  • 18-01-2019

Important Perspective

I really appreciate how Sarah explores the complicity of conflict in our time. She doesn't resort to simplifying and demonizing language to make a point (as we often see), and backs up her points with both research and relatable stories.

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  • Brooke MacBeth
  • 05-10-2020

Abuse and bullying survivors will benefit from listening to this!

A thoughtful, kind, ethical analysis of conflict and abuse. Very beneficial for those who wish to view the world with nuance and behave in a truly compassionate way.

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  • zuffer
  • 31-03-2021

humanity would benefit from this book

loved it and highly recommend it helped illuminate so much for me the world would benefit from this

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  • Anonymous User
  • 19-03-2021

What a fantastic, eye-opening book!

This book was recommended by YouTuber Natalie Wynn (Contrapoints) and this book is a much better, more concise, more cerebral, more compassionate, more empathetic, more historically relevant, and more progressive view of group shunning and supremacy mindset that takes place on the internet (I.e. cancelling) than any other piece of literature out now. I hope people really embrace its core message because it genuinely has the power to improve so many lives if folks with power and authority take its message to heart.

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  • Jase Edgewalker
  • 28-02-2021

Great insights with lots of dross

I strongly recommend this book overall. It introduces a valuable vocabulary and way of articulating that make conflict resolution seem tractable in a way I hadn't seen before. But it also mixes in a lot of sketchy leaps in conclusions and unnecessary (or deleterious) assumptions.

My concerns came early in the book, when Schulman explains that her book is immune to traditional judgements about right- or wrong-ness because she's a creative writer. Her book, she says, isn't academic and doesn't present traditional evidence, so it can't be considered a candidate for the kind of objections that you could fairly level at a book with, say, citations or research to back up its assertions. If Audre Lorde can write up a bunch of semi-true stuff and call it a "biomythography" to escape the worry of writing only what really happened to her, Schulman reasons, she should be able to similarly write a book that escapes traditional scrutiny.

This claim of immunity is such a naked attempt to hedge and avoid criticism that I felt empathy for the author. Clearly, this is a highly sensitive person who wrote because, at least in part, she sees a problem in the world she wants to fix. But she fears criticism based on the demand for evidence, which is a valid concerns as she rarely presents any.

If you write a book full of extraordinary claims, write about real-world events and make strong suggestions about policy and practice, you don't get a free pass. Even if your career has been in creative writing. Even if your insights are gleaned from ways of knowing other than science. You don't get to just lay out your truth and claim there is no tracery of analyzable facts that link them to reality that we could take issue with.

Despite all this, there are large sections of this book I would label "required reading" for anybody with compassion who wants to help resolve conflict within their own lives and in the world in general. I am not especially concerned about the times she wanders off into the weeds, because any careful reader will notice it and know not to be led too far. The valuable parts shine, so they are easy to see.

I didn't care for Schulman's reading. Hiring a professional reader isn't just about avoiding the occasional tripping over words that Schulman chose to leave in the book, it's about knowing how to read for an audience. While her raw style is kind of quaint, I prefer to *hear* a professional reader, just as I prefer to *read* her book rather than an amateur effort.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 27-02-2021

Completely enlightening

The outpouring of empathy from the words on the page is truly staggering.

Made me reconsider what it is to be progressive. And gave a profound sense of understanding to why people to bad things to others, and ways this can be stopped.

Will likely shape how I think about others and their experiences, maybe forever.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 22-02-2021

Most intelligent piece I have read this year

An eye opening intelligent book which sheds new light about the way we all use to view conflicts. The first few episodes' audio quality is a bit muffled, so a bit difficult to listen to in crowded streets, so I just tried to walk mainly on quiet streets because it was fascinating

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  • Anonymous User
  • 19-12-2020

This book changed my life

This book was so incredibly healing and transformative. I truly believe everyone should read it. Let your defensive mechanisms come and go as you read this book and allow yourself to sit in the discomfort. This is the only way to ensure we are not actively promoting the very systems we seek to dismantle on a larger scale within ourselves.

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  • Ashley
  • 28-01-2020

for anyone who interacts with other humans!

This author uses her decades long experience working with several types of groups and 1x1 communication - but all in serious or complex settings - to describe the levels of the cycles of projection, assumptions, trauma responses we all have. It's a learning tool for communication and conflict to see oneself through our interactions with others. For myself I used it as sort of an emotional and intellectual mirror, that I'm certain will take me calmly into work and life human interactions.

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  • Lora Dames
  • 15-01-2020

insightful listen

This had a lot of useful information about conflict resolution that I hope to incorporate into my own life going forward

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  • Anonymous User
  • 05-04-2021

Great Listen - We Absolutely Love To See It

Sarah Schulman is incredibly insightful.

The message central to her book is so poignant today and, could go a long way in solving almost all of the worlds' geopolitical, social and interpersonal issues. Reading this book (or rather listening) really allowed me to reflect on the many times I have felt victimized by people when little harm was actually meant and the harm was mostly imagined. As an anxious person, this book has really helped me come to grips with the fact that my emotional response is not always 100% accurate to the actualities of a situation.

Near the end of the book, Schulman goes on this tangent about the Israel/Palestine conflict that felt somewhat out of place. It lasts about 2 hours and is mainly comprised of Facebook threads and Twitter posts that I can only imagine are incredibly boring to read- but are alright when they are read to you. Overall, I can forgive this because Schulman's discussion of Israel is so interesting- even if it is oddly presented and somewhat out of place in the context of the rest of the book.

Overall, I really enjoyed this book and learnt a lot. This should be read in feminist classes and politics classes too. Better yet, we should teach this at school :)

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