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  • Cheat

  • The Not-So-Subtle Art of Conning Your Way to Sporting Glory
  • By: Titus O'Reily
  • Narrated by: Titus O'Reily
  • Length: 9 hrs and 3 mins
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (11 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Where there's sport, there's cheating. No sport is immune: athletics, swimming, rugby, American football, cricket, baseball, badminton, motorsports, tennis and curling. Yes, even that sport on the ice with brooms.

Almost as soon as humans started playing sport competitively, they started to cheat. They cheated to win, for the fame, for the money and sometimes for reasons that are hard to understand.

From the fiendishly clever to the outright harebrained, the borderline to the blatant, Titus O'Reily takes us through the many and varied ways athletes and countries have tried to cheat over the years.

There's the winner of the New York marathon who was driven in a car part of the way, the male basketballer whose drug test revealed he was pregnant, the Tour de France where many of the riders took the train, the Spanish Paralympic basketball team who faked being intellectually disabled to win gold at the 2000 Paralympics.

As well as sharing an alarming amount of tales involving swapping bodily fluids, Titus takes you through doping, illegal equipment, bribes, playing dirty, faking injuries, wearing disguises, dodgy referees, ball tampering, eye gouging, itching powder, licking an opponent to distract them and sending a dwarf out to bat to shrink the strike zone.

Just as sport has become more sophisticated, so has cheating in sport, from state-backed doping programs to tiny motors in Tour de France bikes.  

What does this say about us, that we cheat with such regularity and creativity? Will technology help stop cheating, or will it only make it worse? 

Mastering the not-so-subtle art of cheating is a hilarious trip through the history of cheating in sport and a handy how-to-guide for the professional athlete in your family.

©2020 Titus O'Reily (P)2020 Penguin Random House Australia

What listeners say about Cheat

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Another winner

Another grey Titus O’Reily book. I love the mispronunciations on words. It gives the listener a sense of authenticity. That Titus is one of us! It seems as though he only scratched the surface though. Sport is so rife with fixes and cheats, that he could have several volumes and it would only just cover half of it. It’s great to know though that it’s not just Australians who cheat, but all nationalities. All you need is competition between two humans.

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So many bad pronunciations.

Good subject and interesting content, but I winced every time I heard the wrong pronunciation of names and towns i know well. It wouldn't have taken much research to correct.

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Enjoyed it...mostly

A great insight into a topic I knew very little about. However the narration is a bit below par and a lot of the pronunciation is off putting particularly of foreign names and places. The dry sarcasm was enjoyable except for the left wing political support.

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