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Publisher's Summary

New York Times best seller • ECPA best seller • "When it comes to the intersection of race, privilege, justice, and the church, Tasha is without question my best teacher. Be the Bridge is THE tool I wish to put in every set of hands." (Jen Hatmaker)

Winner of the Christianity Today Book Award • A leading advocate for racial reconciliation calls Christians to move toward deeper understanding in the midst of a divisive culture.

In an era where we seem to be increasingly divided along racial lines, many are hesitant to step into the gap, fearful of saying or doing the wrong thing. At times the silence, particularly within the church, seems deafening.

But change begins with an honest conversation among a group of Christians willing to give a voice to unspoken hurts, hidden fears, and mounting tensions. These ongoing dialogues have formed the foundation of a global movement called Be the Bridge - a nonprofit organization whose goal is to equip the church to have a distinctive and transformative response to racism and racial division.

In this perspective-shifting book, founder Latasha Morrison shows how you can participate in this incredible work and replicate it in your own community. With conviction and grace, she examines the historical complexities of racism. She expertly applies biblical principles, such as lamentation, confession, and forgiveness, to lay the framework for restoration.

Along with prayers, discussion questions, and other resources to enhance group engagement, Be the Bridge presents a compelling vision of what it means for every follower of Jesus to become a bridge builder - committed to pursuing justice and racial unity in light of the gospel.

©2019 Latasha Morrison, Daniel Hill, and Jennie Allen (P)2019 Random House Audio

Critic Reviews

“There’s much talk about reconciliation - both in our larger culture and in the Church. This is good but if we’re not careful, we’ll end up with much more talking, analyzing, and self-righteous finger-pointing. Certainly, words matter but they seem empty without a deep commitment and embodiment. This is why I’m grateful for Latasha Morrison’s book, Be the Bridge. Morrison has written an incredibly timely and necessary book that's pastoral, prophetic, and practical. But most of all, it’s very personal. In other words, Morrison embodies what she preaches as a genuine bridgebuilder.” (Rev. Eugene Cho, founder of One Day’s Wages and author of Overrated)

“When it comes to the intersection of race, privilege, justice, and the church, Tasha is without question my best teacher. Be the Bridge is the tool I wish to put in every set of hands. Put frankly, if we followed the path she writes about, the path of humility and repentance, courage and action, we would see the end of racism. It really is that simple. Tasha is one of the most important leaders in my generation.” (Jen Hatmaker, New York Times best-selling author of For the Love and Of Mess and Moxie)

“This book is a must-read primer for anyone seeking to be a peacemaker rather than just a peacekeeper. Latasha Morrison equips and encourages us to do the difficult but necessary work of dismantling the walls of systemic racism, confronting implicit racial bias while establishing an anti-racist purpose. For those wanting to understand and embody the deeply woven fabric of racial reconciliation and anti-racism work, this book will expose, educate, elucidate, and ultimately make you an intentionally conscientious neighbor.” (Pastor Darryl Ford, Ikon Community Church)

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  • Adam Shields
  • 18-10-2019

Introduction to Be the Bridge and issues of race

Summary: A mix of Latasha Morrison’s personal story as well as the story of Be the Bridge.

I have never met Latasha Morrison, but several people I know have. I have never been a part of a Be the Bridge group, but again, many people that I know have, and speak very highly of the groups.

Be The Bridge is Latasha Morrison’s first book, and like many practitioners, the book is as much about her work and organization as anything else. This is not a negative; her passion for bridge-building between racial divisions within the Christians church is evident and essential work. Be The Bridge has a model of racial reconciliation, and while it is a useful model, it is not the only model.

There is no ‘perfect book’ for everyone when considering race issues in the US or in the church. However, Be the Bridge will probably be high on my list of books to recommend. I have spent much of the past five years or so reading widely on race. At this point, I have a couple of biases. First, while I do not exclusively read books on race by minority, especially Black authors, I do think I should read books primarily by minority, especially Black authors. Kyle Howard has a short thread on twitter about the problems of White people defining racism. Part of it was: "When the dominate culture claims sole ability to define what is racist, you will often find that they are never defined as being such..."

The second bias around books on race is that we have to admit that people are in different places. Some are new to the discussion and do not have adequate historical or sociological context. Some have a lot of history, but not much sociology or political background. Some people will only look through a biblical lens, and history or sociology will be detrimental in helping them to understand the realities of racism within the church. No book will be right for everyone.

Third, almost all books try to do a bit too much, because the authors, when writing about race, are trying to change hearts and minds, and often racial issues are their real passion. Fourth, non-Christian books are almost always further along in understanding racism than Christian books are.

With all of those biases, I do think Be the Bridge is probably going to be one of my top recommendations for books for Christians about race. Latasha Morrison has a clear orientation; racism needs to be addressed within community. There has to be truth telling and reconciliation. She understands racism as a structural and systemic problem, but one that has to be changed systemically by first changing the hearts of people to create a groundswell of people that can work together to create systemic change.

I have not participated in a Be the Bridge group, but I did participate in a short term group that was somewhat similar in orientation. And while my group was too short, the approach I think was surprisingly helpful (and Be the Bridge groups are much longer). Be the Bridge is not a Kumbaya approach. Their Whiteness 101 and Whiteness Intensive groups have been formational for several people that I know that have been through them. In many ways, it is not possible to separate the organization Be the Bridge, Latasha Morrison (the person), and the Be the Bridge book. Or at least in my mind, I am having a problem doing it, as you can probably tell from this post.

Be the Bridge is a helpful introduction to racial issues in the church. It probably tries to do a bit too much, and it a bit too oriented to the Be the Bridge organizational approach, but it also clearly communicates the issues around race in the church, is a warm and readable book and is approachable for people that are new to matters of race.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 03-07-2020

One sided view

The thing that this book does not address is that racism and racial discrimination are not just from the white population but all populations towards one another. Yes, there should be bridges built between each community each race each color each person, but it is not just the person with white skins fault. Every single person in each community needs to be able to see across the line to reach out and to be willing to see the other person as a human, not just for their color or lack of specific coloring.

6 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 21-05-2020

Best Book on Racial Reconciliation and History

This book is moving, inspiring and informative. I learned a lot about African American history and it gave me a next step solution. The weaving of Bible truth was very important for me. The personal stories helped me to believe and understand parts of history I never knew. I hope to become a bridge builder and continue to become more Christlike in the process. Thank you Latasha!

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  • Jason
  • 10-07-2020

Proceed with Caution

wonderfully narrated, great historical accounts, and great personal accounts from the author, but struggles from a theological standpoint. Many scriptures from personal accounts in the Bible applied to present day groups, some Scriptures specific to God's chosen people of Israel applied to present day groups, other Scriptures twisted to fit a narrative or just misapplied altogether. I was hoping for more objective use of Scripture. The idea of meeting in small groups is wonderful and should happen, but much of the premise here is based in Critical Race Theory (add to that the online Facebook groups and extra classes you can take) which I cannot support as a Bible-believing Christian. I will still use some of this book as a tool for listening and encouraging group sessions, but I think this book misses the mark as a whole and does not address deep issues. I will read more books looking for a better answer that is better supported by Scripture.

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  • K C
  • 15-06-2020

Only tears apologies and reparations will help.

Agonizing to listen to the authors illogical conclusions based on emotions and one sided facts.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 08-08-2020

I wanted to like it...

I have never listened to a more prejudiced and hostile book in my life. Among many other things, because of MY skin color, the author says I should "bow down" in humility. ...The reason? Supposedly, I treat HER a certain way .... because of the color of her skin... Does the author not hear what she is saying????

What I believe is the author's intent of helping to heal race relations and bring people together is NOT achieved in the tone of this book. I cannot assume the societal guilt for things other people did....I just cant. I am responsible for my actions and for speaking out when I see injustices in the world around me. I am not going to absorb the guilt for what other people do. I may feel sadness or anger at another's actions and words (please read The Sunflower), but I can't take on someone else's sins..

Fighting prejudice with a book that is laced with blatant racial prejudice (like this one) is not the answer. The author should be setting the example for what she is asking the reader to do.

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  • David
  • 04-06-2020

A Must-Read!

This book is one of the best books ever written. It is practical, eye-opening, and motivating for all races, especially white people who are looking to enrich their perspective, especially now in 2020.

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  • Craig Holmes
  • 08-07-2020

One sided

Racial reconciliation is one of the critical issues of our time, so I wish the writer great success. Latasha only discusses one form of entitlement , race. The truth is there are many many types of entitlement. Growing up in a two parent home, having parents who are connected politically. On and on the list could go. Many in the African American community have entitlements as well as whites. In addition it is not just the sin of white supremacy that we need to lament. We also as a country need to lament lawlessness and absent fathers that so damages our country. The book comes across one sided. I do join with the author in hopes and prayers for healing of our nation

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  • Carin D.
  • 04-02-2020

A prophetic voice for our time

Tasha’s voice is so needed right now...strong and courageous, full of love and grace. She’s not afraid to say the hard things, truthful things, uncomfortable things but with words of hope and freedom. Thank you Tasha, for your bravery and lived commitment to the work God is calling all of us to do. If you are a member of majority culture who wants to know how to be part of the work of racial reconciliation you will be encouraged and get answers here.

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  • eagle098
  • 23-08-2020

Bad for the Church in America

Latasha Morrison has a great heart, but is leading many astray. This book is the Christian version of “White Fragility”. The author has 1 foot in a biblical worldview and another foot in a worldly worldview known as critical race theory. Critical race theory has roots in Marxism, and clashes with biblical Christianity. Latasha Morrison has gotten caught up in viewing her identity from a worldly perspective rather than a biblical perspective. Rather than praising God for his grace, and his work in her life as a believer who is “in Christ”, preaching the gospel to herself as a sinner who is saved by grace alone through faith alone in Christ, instead her focus is on her ethnicity and on the injustices of the past. This perspective is poison. The movement “Be the Bridge” is an attempt to slap a Band-Aid on a worldly problem but does not get to the heart of the issue, which is sin in the human heart that condemns someone to hell. Social justice should not be placed on a pedestal or even side-by-side next to the gospel of Jesus Christ, the gospel is the most important issue and this book sidesteps the gospel. Church beware!

1 person found this helpful

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