Get Your Free Audiobook

Non-member price: $5.73

After 30 days, Audible is $16.45/mo. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

Art has been used as a means of communication, self-expression, group interaction, diagnosis, and conflict resolution throughout history. For thousands of years, cultures and religions around the world have incorporated the use of carved idols and charms, as well as sacred paintings and symbols, in the healing process. The establishment of art therapy as a unique and publicly accepted therapeutic approach only took place recently, in the mid-20th century. The emergence of art therapy as a profession arose independently and simultaneously in the United States and Europe. The term "art therapy" was coined in 1942 by British artist Adrian Hill, who discovered the healthful benefits of painting and drawing while recovering from tuberculosis. In the 1940, several writers in the mental health field began to describe their work with people in treatment as "art therapy". As there were no formal art therapy courses or training programs available at that time. These care providers were often educated in other disciplines and supervised by psychiatrists, psychologists, or other mental health care professionals. Art therapy came into existence in the middle of the 20th century. It is based on the concept of visual representations, in order to express one's feelings. Paints, chalks, and clay are the essential tools of art therapy. The therapy actually aims to relax an exerted brain and psychology, in order to refresh it, stabilize it, and make it more receptive. Art therapy is therefore especially useful for the people who stress a lot at the work place, and for those who have mental tensions. In addition, the therapy also helps people who are slow learners or are mentally ill. Art therapy is beneficial to sustain mental health and emotional well-being. The treatment involves drawing, sculpture, photography, and visual art as a vent to expressions.

©2017 Patricia A Carlisle (P)2017 Patricia A Carlisle

What listeners say about Art Therapy

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 2.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 2.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Explains Art Therapy

This book delivers what it promises although the contents is short it's succinct. Thank you for the book. The narrator is speaking English as his 2nd or 6th language and if you focus on the content that's not a problem especially if you're into multi culturism. I slowed the sound by 2 points which helped.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for mya
  • mya
  • 03-01-2021

great basic info

I enjoyed the basic information in this book. It is not super detailed but gives information someone could then study more.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for eaglecliff
  • eaglecliff
  • 18-10-2018

Dreadful narration - gross!

May be unable to listen to I doubt that I will be able to hear the entire book because machine-like voicing and mispronunciations sound half-literate; I wish the author had done her own narration.

To even imagine that she paid for narration like this makes my wallet gasp!

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Rebecca Hunt
  • Rebecca Hunt
  • 01-01-2018

Read by a computer

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

If it had been read by an actual human being and possible to listen to for more than a few seconds.

Would you ever listen to anything by Patricia A Carlisle again?

If it was read by a person, maybe. It's hard to say since I couldn't get through a single chapter.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

It was terrible and every sentence had the exact same inflection and tone.

Any additional comments?

Don't buy this.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Lucas Kelly
  • Lucas Kelly
  • 28-12-2017

Very basic info and terrible narration

No in depth information. Very basic and obvious information. Narration sounded like GPS.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for roberta
  • roberta
  • 17-01-2020

Art therapy

The book give you a big picture on the subject.
I enjoy the listening. I liked it

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Amazon Customer
  • Amazon Customer
  • 23-11-2017

Very strange

The content seemed repetitive, and padded out. Most off putting was the commentator, he has a fast-then-slow style. A chore to listen to the end - only my interest in the topic kept me engaged.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for bunny_girl
  • bunny_girl
  • 04-10-2017

Good introduction

The narrators voice irritated me at first but towards the end I found it strangely endearing.

It's a good, short introduction to art therapy. However, it would have been better if it were more in-depth.

In the spirit of reconciliation, Audible Australia acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples today.