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A Tale of Love and Darkness

By: Amos Oz
Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki
Length: 23 hrs and 52 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (7 ratings)
Non-member price: $46.09
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Publisher's Summary

Tragic, comic, and utterly honest, this extraordinary memoir is at once a great family saga and a magical self-portrait of a writer who witnessed the birth of a nation and lived through its turbulent history.

It is the story of a boy growing up in the war-torn Jerusalem of the 40s and 50s in a small apartment crowded with books in 12 languages and relatives speaking nearly as many. His mother and father, both wonderful people, were ill-suited to each other. When Oz was 12 and a half years old, his mother committed suicide - a tragedy that was to change his life. He leaves the constraints of the family and the community of dreamers, scholars, and failed businessmen to join a kibbutz, changes his name, marries, has children, and finally becomes a writer as well as an active participant in the political life of Israel. A story of clashing cultures and lives, of suffering and perseverance, of love and darkness.

©2016 Amos Oz (P)2016 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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  • cocopuff
  • 11-12-2016

Engrossing

I think this book could have done with a bit of editing (parts tend to drag), but overall it is an engrossing account of the author's childhood in Israel just before statehood to the early 60s, with references to his later adult life. The death of his mother during his early adolescence is central to the narrative both in form and meaning. I can't imagine a more sensitive narrator than Stefan Rudnicki.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • 匿名
  • 08-02-2018

Extraordinary descriptions of a family story.

Deeply moving insights into Jerusalem at a remarkable period of time in Israeli history intertwined with a tragic and uplifting saga of a family .

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • liketolisten
  • 13-02-2019

You definitely don't have to be Jewish

..to appreciate this masterpiece of a memoir. Oz paints a lyrical picture of his family members, their history, and his own upbringing with tremendous wit and compassion, and does not shy away from the most painful experiences. The pronunciation of a few Israel location names could have been corrected. I have no idea whether the Russian dialog was faithfully conveyed, but it sounded convincing. Overall, a wonderful reading of a masterful testament to Amoz Oz and his times.

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  • Devon
  • 27-01-2019

His life was interesting, but not his memoir

He seems for forget what he's already told you, For example I got maybe a 3rd of the way in and he'd described his father's rejection of spirituality about 10 times in almost the same words. There is a great interview with one of his aunts about life in Eastern Europe and I kept hoping for more like that, but gave up. He tells you that his father constantly makes bad jokes and then he feels the need to share them with you. There's too much detail! We don't need to know about every item on his grandfather's desk. Once he describes a very ordinary kid lying on the driveway woolgathering in a way every kid on earth has watching the sun set in his neighborhood. He ends up describing in painful detail the exact colors as they change in the sunset. It is absolutely the most tedious passage I've ever read. I heard an interview with Oz and had great hopes, but they were dashed.

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  • Jo Brown
  • 04-03-2017

Brilliant

Beautifully written and spoken. This book was pure quality . I was so sad when I finished it but will listen to it again.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Mr Daniel S Kelly
  • 04-01-2017

absorbing and memorable autobiography.

the details of prewar life in Poland,the personal account of the war of the Israeli War of Independence,the Sabbath walk across Jerusalem to Oz's uncle's house and so much more.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • MAGGS
  • 30-04-2018

A tale of Love and Darkness - Great storytelling

A tale of Love and Darkness - Great storytelling
The author Amos Oz told the story of his life brilliantly, leaving his darkest moment to the end.
Brilliant narration

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Dorota Kotowicz
  • 10-03-2018

Words fail to describe the beauty and power

of this book. They say that life is stranger than fiction and as Amos Oz shows us it can be even more beautiful and tragic. Extraordinary story....Amos Oz is a writer who can measure himself with the giants of the 19th century Russian litterature as far as the mastership, the power of observation and emotiobal awarness areconcerned.Plus a tremendous erudition and culture.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful