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  • Milkman

  • By: Anna Burns
  • Narrated by: Bríd Brennan
  • Length: 14 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 71

In this unnamed city, to be interesting is dangerous. Middle sister, our protagonist, is busy attempting to keep her mother from discovering her maybe-boyfriend and to keep everyone in the dark about her encounter with Milkman. But when first brother-in-law sniffs out her struggle, and rumours start to swell, middle sister becomes 'interesting'. The last thing she ever wanted to be. To be interesting is to be noticed and to be noticed is dangerous. Milkman is a tale of gossip and hearsay, silence and deliberate deafness. It is the story of inaction with enormous consequences.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • magic

  • By Anonymous User on 12-09-2018

A rollercoaster of delights!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-10-2018

This experience was a total delight from the opening phrases to the end. I was taken on an Irish history lesson through such powerful times. Times that being here in Australia I did not experience, only saw on TV news programmes, and in newspaper headlines. This audio book made me cry, laugh, stand open mouthed in absolute shock and horror, made me lie awake in frustrated angst at the fate of nearly girlfriend or middle sister as she was bullied, made an outcast, and stalked by characters that if the state troopers didn't get, or the renouncers bomb, I wanted to strangle myself. I found myself screaming silently to nearly girlfriend, no, no, no, don't do that, don't think that. Please sometimes nearly girlfriend please open your mouth and speak! The rollercoaster of emotions the listener/reader experiences is in stark contrast to the almost monotone, hilarious characters and frozen emotion of the heroine. I absolutely loved this book and will immediately start it again. Did this really happen? Were whole generations of Irish people taken through this time?