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Philip

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OK but only for BitCoin nuts

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-2019

Not a great read. A lot of history but not anything anyone would care about unless you wondered what all the hype was. We still don't know the end of the story. An interesting concept but another IT system that is still being plundered by geeks - only on this occasion - you can't sue anyone if you lose your money. The only think about Billionaires is that by definition they were lucky, rather than clever. Had they lost everything no-one would have written the book. Whether there is more money to be made other than those involved early on will; be interesting to experience. I think more billionaires from BC are pretty unlikely.

Mmmmm....

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-2019

Perhaps a little disappointing for JJM. I have been charmed by her earlier books this was much more of a 'true romance' than a 'romantic comedy' one might normally expect. Some interesting twists, the usual overall aspects of loss, but it left me feeling it was rather formulaic. Not one of her best but not bad enough to avoid. A must for many of her true fans. Just didn't work quite so well for me. Can't win them all, can you?

Quirky and entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-2019

I rather liked this book, surprisingly free of charge, but definitely worth the effort. Dan O'Grady gave effective credibility to the characters particularly the central one - a scientist on the autistic spectrum - with a rather charming view of love and what are his and others emotions. Quite a short book with more than a hint of irony - both highly entertaining and likeable. I could look further to this author and narrator. Definitely worth the effort.

A worthwhile whodunnit story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-2019

So it's a typical Michael Robotham saga characterised by clues leading you off and on the beaten track ending up being the least likely person to have done it. However, the story is always worth sticking to You can't really stop listening and, somewhat surprisingly, I rather liked Jo Jameson's laconic narration which successfully negotiated many personas including the many female characters. In fact, I would say he significantly added to the books interest. Not a literary piece but a worthwhile read and I was most content to tune in almost anytime without losing track of where I was,

I could not access this book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-2019

After the Book Thief I was expecting a little more. I could never access Zusak’s characters and there were aspects of his writing which irked like his use of metaphor and simile. Garrulous hair, dogs so fat that they reassembled their diabetic owners. For me these were a bridge too far. I sensed in this book an attempt at being Tim Winton with his retrained and languid prose otherwise packed with meaning, understanding and reverence of country folk and their equal complexity. This all seemed a little contrived. Perhaps my biggest irritation was the authors voice itself. Narration is an art every bit as important as the writing and I fear this may have detracted from my enjoyment. It made the characters rather indistinguishable and rather dull and so much more could have been delivered by a reader with greater skill. I say this with little or no knowledge of Zusak’s life and experience in narration but in attempt to explain away by general inability to listen to this book at any point. I did finish it but it was quite a labour to do so. It is pity because he is up and coming, valued to date and I really wanted to like the book (which is being heavily advertised in book stores.) Oh well, not ever book is a delight. I will now and read the glowing reviews of BofC. I wanted to say my piece first.

Who I Am cover art

Essential for those baby boomer rock fans

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-10-2019

Read long ago and rated on another Audible regional Web site. A must read for who/Townsend fans.

A must for Collins fans

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-10-2019

An interesting story (almost) of rags to riches and with all the limitations that money can buy. There were times I found the author self-indulgent but this was perhaps balanced by the bravery of revealing his personal flaws. And Collins identifies many, particularly his conflict between need and loyalty. Perhaps his own poor parenting that gave him ambition outside family security. Somehow wealth can bail you out of most things but alcohol abuse. But in the end PC is a notable musician, a celebrity of the media (in the widest sense), and yet in one sense an ordinary guy with natural talent, a frequently likeable personality, a workaholic, with an inability to sustain anything but his music. A success? A failure? Well, of course, both in abundance. As one who is only 1 year older, and successful in many ways, I am pretty boring at the side of him. Then again, I am not badly off and I have a wife who I can stick with forever and every chance she will reciprocate. In addition, I can still listen to PC anytime and experience the heartbreak I have had as he has. I like knowing that his royalties make him even more affluent but, sadly a little near to death. May his wealth end up in the many places he has directed it to, including ‘Custa’s’ last stand. “Thank you for the music” as ABBA once sung. I might also have died for that. One of our treasures. May you live forever Phil! And perhaps you will.

Loved this book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-09-2019

Monty Python was an essential par of my University Education although I confess I was perhaps more amused by their anarchic humour than their creative genius. Now the latter is more obvious. I had underestimated the contribution of Eric Idle to their overall success and this book establishes how important EI was in their success. In addition, he describes his elitist life with enough humility for you to really like him. He still sees his failings and yet became a friend to many great celebrities some of us who have left us. I imagine he is much loved back. I was so pleased to know that they were also loveable people in private through his eyes. A man with significant wealth, privilege and high level contacts but I’d be happy to invite him found to dinner just because he still sees how funny we all are. To my surprise this turned out to be a nostalgic autobiography that anyone with a send of humour, love of 60-70’s popular music and the cult of personality will simply adore. please write more Eric!

Funny, serious and familiar

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-09-2019

One cannot avoid the conclusion that the characters Liane Moriarty writes about are indeed our friends and family. She writes with affection. irony and allows us to see the bigotry that is in all of us. In addition, she allows us to explore the dilemmas of the domestic middle class world we inhabit. Only the middle classes can profess such moral rectitude and at the same time recognise its own angst. I have read 2 other books from this author and this - for some reason - is definitely the best so far. A very talented storyteller. Not a Pulitzer price winner perhaps but definitely a must read.

A real life spy story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-2019

One cannot imagine how espionage really works until you realise much of the ‘fantasy’ one sees on books and films is mirrored in real life. This is about a man with unusual conscience who possibly lost everything for his actions. And remarkably he did it for the west and particularly for Britain. Any honour he got should perhaps be tripled. The betrayal was inevitable but sadly in the end by CIA defector colleague seeking cash.