LISTENER

Eloise

  • 3
  • reviews
  • 21
  • helpful votes
  • 4
  • ratings

A must-read for parents

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-08-2019

Essential information for any parent - or any human! Practical strategies which can be applied immediately with astounding results. Helpful for adults trying to be better communicators, partners, and people, as well as parents striving to raise happy, healthy and secure kids. My only quibble is that the narration gets a bit stilted. It's narrated by the authors, who are brilliant researchers and therapists, but the delivery lacks a bit of oomph.

4 people found this helpful

First-rate story, third-rate narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-08-2019

I wanted to love this book. The story is timely and urgent, and ought to be on high school English curriculums and bestseller lists. Unfortunately, the audiobook narration was shared by several different people, who are mostly writers rather than gifted actors or narrators. It was difficult to fully immerse myself in the author's intimate story as every chapter was told by someone else, in wildly unpredictable styles that ranged from amused theatrics to monotone speedreading. This was frustrating, disappointing, and destroyed the story-telling magic for me. I wish the publisher would re-release this audiobook with only one narrator - preferably someone who makes a living from performing, rather than writing, words - so that this moving, unique and hopefully soon-to-be classic, memoir can have the treatment it deserves.

15 people found this helpful

Fascinating concept, distracting tone

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-06-2019

The subject of this book - a transgender woman who runs a trauma cleaning business - is fascinating, but I found the author's flowery tone and gushing praise of Sandra distracting at times. Sarah Krasnostein states the book is a "love letter to Sandra," and it often drowns in personal affection. The author's unrestrained use of figurative language isn't to my personal taste (multiple metaphors or similes in the same sentence had me rolling my eyes). The story would have had more impact on me if there had been less philosophising, fewer descriptions and less exuberant cheerleading for Sandra. These all interfered like white noise in a story that would have spoken - loudly - for itself. The narration was superb. The book is great, overall. I just wanted to cut out too many phrases, far too often, to give it a full five stars. The author also skirts around Sandra's darker qualities, brushing them under the carpet of childhood trauma rather than examining them with more depth and objectivity. That was disappointing.

2 people found this helpful