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Won

  • 11
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  • 14
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  • 104
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Back to his best.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-12-2019

After not really enjoying the co-authored books Scarrow wrote that featured Cato and Macro, this book finds Mr Scarrow back to his best.

The Best Beatles Complete Anthology Available

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-08-2019

The most complete Beatles document you can get. it's a MUST HAVE for Beatles fans

read this book now

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-2019

brilliant from start to finish. I cannot fathom why I put off getting this book. a stunning landscape of characters and places.

Waiting for part 2 .....

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-01-2019

as an avid Beatles fan this book was a must. and while the narrators accents are a little off the mark, it doesn't detract from the book. The book is well researched and written and a must have for a Beatles, music, music production and George Martin fan.. Bring on the next volume ...

If you are expecting the usual quality...don’t bother

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-2019

One of the only books I have ever returned to audible The story is repetitive to the extreme (get in a jam...escape) over and over and over again where it got to the point that I no longer cared if the hero was killed off or not. The story itself rarely progressed to new heights.. The narrator chose (or was directed) to adopt a characterization between a bad Terry Thomas impersonation or Dick Dasterdly for the villain that was laughable and made the story more melodramatic than necessary. I gave 1 star only because zero stars is not an option. I love the usual Cato and Macro stories but this co written work is a major mistake.

Such a beautiful book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-09-2018

all of the old world charm that I remember from reading the book years ago

can't wait for the next installment

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-05-2018

well written and moves quickly through the time period. awesome narration that brings life to the characters.

Simply brilliant autobiography

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-2018

with Pete narrating his own story and the humour that comes through the narration this is simply put, the best book in my list. he is honest and open about the events in his life and gives detailed insights into the Who and other works that he has composed. this book is hard to put down. if you like autobiographies, if you like the Who (even if you have a passing interest in the band) I STRONGLY recommend this book to you.

I tried...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-04-2016

Is there anything you would change about this book?

While I enjoyed "The Valley of the Horses" and REALLY enjoyed the previously released, "The Clan of the Cave Bear", I find myself giving the story of "The Mammoth Hunters" 2 stars... just.The descriptions of the what we would now call archaeology, is obviously well researched, very well written and thoroughly enjoyable. But the story of Ayla and Jondelar just goes to hell. Add to this so much over descriptive sex liberally scattered in the book. I had no idea that sexual organs had so many similes’. It made me wonder if the book wasn’t written by a lovesick 17 yr. old.Which is also an appropriate description for the continual soap opera that plagues the two main characters. He wants her but he can’t talk to her because she walked past him talking to someone else which he thinks that she doesn’t want him so he doesn’t talk to her even more which makes her ignore him (unless she is spying on him or he is spying on her) when she won’t talk to him but she wants him so badly that it shows and he thinks that her wanting is her REALLY wanting not him but someone else so they don’t talk. But every single other person in the camp can see that they want each other but its not their business to tell them because someone 300 years ago didn’t mention it and now its custom in the camp yet they are eager to accept any other changes but this one (except for the dude who thinks she is a flathead and therefore has no feelings). If you remove all this emotional tripe, it’s a good book, but it really got to silly levels where I would just fast forward to the next discussion about how Ayla discovered (accidentally) how to pan for gold by washing her dishes in the shallow part of the river. The discovery of which made her jump back and accidentally bash a piece of pyrite to a bit of flint and discover fire that happened to burn the wood under the hollow rock that she used to store her meat and yams and discovered how to cook a roast…. the smell of which, enticed a sabre tooth tiger to her camp, which she of course trained and rode around the valley!

Has The Mammoth Hunters put you off other books in this genre?

no.. but it tried it's best

What about Rowena Cooper’s performance did you like?

Well read and characterised. If not for the reading, I probably would have abandoned the book.

If this book were a film would you go see it?

no

7 people found this helpful

Change of Narrator Mid Series Not a Good Idea...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-2015

Is there anything you would change about this book?

We as readers, understand there there are certain historical inaccuracies in the narrative (to add to the drama) so why would they bother to attempt to make the names historically accurate given a precedence established in two prior books in the series?

Why, given as this is now the third book in the series, did they bother to change the pronunciation of names, Sevillia to Serwilia or Octavian to Octahwian and the continual use of the soft C for Cicero as Kikero not the usual pronunciation of hard C sounding Sisero. Ariowistus??

Was this a narrator choice or a production choice to make a majority of the names sound like old vaudeville jokes. I can understand trying to give some validity to the ancient Latin pronunciation of the letter V but given that the names had already been established in the previous books and current pronunciation in the world in general is to use the V as we do now not as a W, it just proved to ruin the narration

If the producers of this reading wanted to use REAL Roman names they should have used Octavianus not Octavian. If they wanted to use the real Latin pronunciation of Julius, they should have made it sound as it was.. Iulius Kaisahr (YOO-lee-us Kye-sahr).

What didn’t you like about Paul Blake’s performance?

Given the previous brilliant readings Book 1 and Book 2, I am at a loss to understand why they changed narrators for Book 3, and in doing so, why the narrator of this book (possibly under producers direction) seemed to change the past intensity of the readings to be a breathless rushing through the book/narration

Any additional comments?

.

7 people found this helpful